AT&T to roll out high-speed HSPA 7.2 in six U.S. cities this year

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
AT&T plans to offer faster wireless data connections on its 3G network to customers, including iPhone users, when it enables High Speed Packet Access 7.2 technology in a half-dozen cities by the end of 2009.



The upgrade delivers theoretical peak speeds twice that of the carrier's existing 3G network. Deployment will begin in Charlotte, N.C.; Chicago, Ill.; Dallas, Tex.; Houston, Tex.; Los Angeles, Calif.; and Miami, Fla. By the end of 2010, AT&T intends to have HSPA 7.2 available in 25 of the nation's 30 largest markets. And by the end of 2011, the nation's second-largest wireless carrier hopes to have the higher speed data available for 90 percent of its existing 3G coverage areas.



"Our deployment of HSPA 7.2 and supporting backhaul connectivity will enable our customers to continue to ride the leading edge of emerging devices and thousands of mobile applications," said John Stankey, president and CEO, AT&T Operations. "Our network is based on the predominant technology platform used by operators worldwide and has been tested by today's most popular devices. That experience gives us an important advantage in developing and deploying new technologies to meet customers' future needs."



The new network speeds will allow iPhone 3GS users to take full advantage of their device, allowing theoretical download speeds of up to 7.2Mbps. In all, AT&T plans to have six HSPA 7.2-compatible phones available for customers on its network by the end of the year, as well as two LaptopConnect cards.



AT&T said that it will also be performing significant upgrades to its "wireless backhaul" in the process, allowing the network to support HSPA 7.2 and 4G LTE -- the next generation of wireless broadband, expected to begin its roll out in 2011.



"With HSPA 7.2, we're making the nation's fastest 3G network even faster, and we'll be able to deploy this technology before LTE networks, devices and equipment grow to scale," Stankey said. "Even as we look forward to LTE, we know that 3G will be the predominant mobile broadband network technology worldwide for smartphones for the next few years. AT&T's strategy will deliver faster 3G speeds, while also allowing us to build the foundation for the 4G future."



In recent weeks, AT&T has announced its intentions to spend more than $17 billion on improving its network this year alone. The carrier recently strengthened its 3G signal in the New York-New Jersey Tri-State Region, and plans nearly 1,900 new cell towers to be built across the country this year.



In the face of network troubles partially caused by the bandwidth-guzzling iPhone -- dubbed the "Hummer of cellphones" in a New York Times article -- AT&T has fought back in an attempt to improve its image as customers online voice complaints.



The exclusive carrier of the iPhone in the U.S. announced last week that multimedia messaging capabilities would be enabled for the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS on Sept. 25. The company has not announced when it will make tethering the iPhone data connection with other devices available.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 36
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,915member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    AT&T plans to offer faster wireless data connections on its 3G network to customers, including iPhone users, when it enables High Speed Packet Access 7.2 technology in a half-dozen cities by the end of 2009.



    The upgrade delivers theoretical peak speeds twice that of the carrier's existing 3G network. Deployment will begin in Charlotte, N.C.; Chicago, Ill.; Dallas, Tex.; Houston, Tex.; Los Angeles, Calif.; and Miami, Fla. By the end of 2010, AT&T intends to have HSPA 7.2 available in 25 of the nation's 30 largest markets. And by the end of 2011, the nation's second-largest wireless carrier hopes to have the higher speed data available for 90 percent of its existing 3G coverage areas.



    "Our deployment of HSPA 7.2 and supporting backhaul connectivity will enable our customers to continue to ride the leading edge of emerging devices and thousands of mobile applications," said John Stankey, president and CEO, AT&T Operations. "Our network is based on the predominant technology platform used by operators worldwide and has been tested by today's most popular devices. That experience gives us an important advantage in developing and deploying new technologies to meet customers' future needs."



    The new network speeds will allow iPhone 3GS users to take full advantage of their device, allowing theoretical download speeds of up to 7.2Mbps. In all, AT&T plans to have six HSPA 7.2-compatible phones available for customers on its network by the end of the year, as well as two LaptopConnect cards.



    AT&T said that it will also be performing significant upgrades to its "wireless backhaul" in the process, allowing the network to support HSPA 7.2 and 4G LTE -- the next generation of wireless broadband, expected to begin its roll out in 2011.



    "With HSPA 7.2, we're making the nation's fastest 3G network even faster, and we'll be able to deploy this technology before LTE networks, devices and equipment grow to scale," Stankey said. "Even as we look forward to LTE, we know that 3G will be the predominant mobile broadband network technology worldwide for smartphones for the next few years. AT&T's strategy will deliver faster 3G speeds, while also allowing us to build the foundation for the 4G future."



    In recent weeks, AT&T has announced its intentions to spend more than $17 billion on improving its network this year alone. The carrier recently strengthened its 3G signal in the New York-New Jersey Tri-State Region, and plans nearly 1,900 new cell towers to be built across the country this year.



    In the face of network troubles partially caused by the bandwidth-guzzling iPhone -- dubbed the "Hummer of cellphones" in a New York Times article -- AT&T has fought back in an attempt to improve its image as customers online voice complaints.



    The exclusive carrier of the iPhone in the U.S. announced last week that multimedia messaging capabilities would be enabled for the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS on Sept. 25. The company has not announced when it will make tethering the iPhone data connection with other devices available.



    Color me shocked: No NY or Philly. The Eastern corridor is invisible to AT&T, apparently.
  • Reply 2 of 36
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.
  • Reply 3 of 36
    Now that should make things Snappy.
  • Reply 4 of 36
    Oh well... \
  • Reply 5 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    AT&T plans to offer faster wireless data connections on its 3G network to customers, including iPhone users, when it enables High Speed Packet Access 7.2 technology in a half-dozen cities by the end of 2009.



    The upgrade delivers theoretical peak speeds twice that of the carrier's existing 3G network. Deployment will begin in Charlotte, N.C.; Chicago, Ill.; Dallas, Tex.; Houston, Tex.; Los Angeles, Calif.; and Miami, Fla. By the end of 2010, AT&T intends to have HSPA 7.2 available in 25 of the nation's 30 largest markets. And by the end of 2011, the nation's second-largest wireless carrier hopes to have the higher speed data available for 90 percent of its existing 3G coverage areas.



    "Our deployment of HSPA 7.2 and supporting backhaul connectivity will enable our customers to continue to ride the leading edge of emerging devices and thousands of mobile applications," said John Stankey, president and CEO, AT&T Operations. "Our network is based on the predominant technology platform used by operators worldwide and has been tested by today's most popular devices. That experience gives us an important advantage in developing and deploying new technologies to meet customers' future needs."



    The new network speeds will allow iPhone 3GS users to take full advantage of their device, allowing theoretical download speeds of up to 7.2Mbps. In all, AT&T plans to have six HSPA 7.2-compatible phones available for customers on its network by the end of the year, as well as two LaptopConnect cards.



    AT&T said that it will also be performing significant upgrades to its "wireless backhaul" in the process, allowing the network to support HSPA 7.2 and 4G LTE -- the next generation of wireless broadband, expected to begin its roll out in 2011.



    "With HSPA 7.2, we're making the nation's fastest 3G network even faster, and we'll be able to deploy this technology before LTE networks, devices and equipment grow to scale," Stankey said. "Even as we look forward to LTE, we know that 3G will be the predominant mobile broadband network technology worldwide for smartphones for the next few years. AT&T's strategy will deliver faster 3G speeds, while also allowing us to build the foundation for the 4G future."



    In recent weeks, AT&T has announced its intentions to spend more than $17 billion on improving its network this year alone. The carrier recently strengthened its 3G signal in the New York-New Jersey Tri-State Region, and plans nearly 1,900 new cell towers to be built across the country this year.



    In the face of network troubles partially caused by the bandwidth-guzzling iPhone -- dubbed the "Hummer of cellphones" in a New York Times article -- AT&T has fought back in an attempt to improve its image as customers online voice complaints.



    The exclusive carrier of the iPhone in the U.S. announced last week that multimedia messaging capabilities would be enabled for the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS on Sept. 25. The company has not announced when it will make tethering the iPhone data connection with other devices available.



    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Until tethering comes to AT&T what's the point? We all have email (MMS is not really needed) and many use cloud based photo sharing sites (as to not bog down everybody with the same pic in the same email).



    Agree with the above user as well... no northeast?



    AT&T better hope Apple signs that extension as whoever also gets it, you will be considered a 'new sub' on that carrier (new sub price) and I am sure ebay'ing your AT&T 3GS will cover AT&T's prorated ETF.



    IMHO = Still no legit tether on AT&T = Fail



    Cheers

    -wsn
  • Reply 6 of 36
    thrangthrang Posts: 751member
    I'm sick and tired of AT&T's recent PR push to tout their "investments" in providing quality services. I live in northern NJ and have been in contact with a senior AT&T systems engineer for more than a year, and the areas that were crappy last year are still crappy today. Whatever they're doing isn't resulting in improved end-to-end performance.
  • Reply 7 of 36
    Call me crazy, but I read that list as AT&T consolidating in the markets where they have a decent lead. Essentially capitulating in those markets where their network is a distant also-ran to their competitor. I get the feeling the next 19 markets will follow that trend.
  • Reply 8 of 36
    Houston!! Woo hoo! We actually get the hook up....craziness.
  • Reply 9 of 36
    I live in Charlotte. My downtown gym can receive a 3G signal with full bars inside - but usually I get no bars or Edge. Which means in this case it's not about how well 3G penetrates buildings, it's simple capacity. There are two AT&T buildings in the immediate vicinity(one next door, one within two blocks), at least one with many antennas on the roof.



    I live within a mile of downtown. My signal comes and goes like the wind.



    6 miles outside the city, within a mile of the area's biggest shopping mall, there are large regions of complete dead space though the coverage maps say otherwise.



    Charlotte needs tons of attention from AT&T. It's kind of sad that I'm excited that the carrier I pay for service might actually deliver that service.
  • Reply 10 of 36
    Charlotte, but not Atlanta? Are you kidding me?
  • Reply 11 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by moo-shu cereal View Post


    Houston!! Woo hoo! We actually get the hook up....craziness.



    +1. We get the 850 Mhz spectrum before most places and now we get 7.2 setup as well. Awesome.
  • Reply 12 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.



    Yeah, but who came up with the simple, one size fits all, unlimited data plan for web and e-mail?



    Sounds like an Apple thing to do. If AT&T is solely in control, they could easily price tier the data plans in an effort to curb demand on it's network. If AT&T did try this, how fast would Steve Jobs want the CEO of AT&T in Steve's office in Cupertino???



    I bet there are more limitations on the iPhone then we know of, other than AT&T's inability to meet the data demand on it's network that ruins the iPhone experience.
  • Reply 13 of 36
    Woohoo!

    Although I live in Palm Beach, this will give me more reason to visit my g/f in Miami!



    I think I should get a iPhone 3G or 3GS first... :-/
  • Reply 14 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by donlphi View Post


    Oh well... \



    It seems you guys are left out..
  • Reply 15 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.



    ...were Apple's sales forecasts and estimated bandwidth usage per iPhone accurate....and how long did Apple give AT&T to upgrade the network? How could they be accurate when the APP Store wasn't even discussed during the contract negotiations? It takes years to upgrade networks.



    By the way, it was Apple who demanded an unlimited data plan for iPhone users. This is one of the root causes of all our problems.
  • Reply 16 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    I wish you would stop repeating that quote of "the Hummer". That NY Times article was not well written and totally biased against iPhone users. How AT&T could not have anticipated this surge for over 2 years is mind baffling. They , and only they, should be held accountable, not the user nor the device.



    Right. AT&T should have had perfect foresight.



    It's interesting that the iPhone fanboys never blame Apple for choosing to enter into an exclusive contract. Why didn't Apple make their device accessible to multiple carriers?



    Further, how is the NYT article biased? Based on all reports, iPhone users place considerable higher demands on the network than do any other smartphone user.



    What more do you want AT&T to do? They've spent tens of millions of dollars upgrading their network, they've installed over a thousand new towers, and they give smartphone users free use of their hotspots. Despite all of that, there will always be dead zones, or ares of oversaturation. You can't get something for nothing, and you certainly can't get it overnight.



    Grow up, and stop whining like an obnoxious teenager.
  • Reply 17 of 36
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post


    What more do you want AT&T to do? They've spent tens of millions of dollars upgrading their network, they've installed over a thousand new towers, and they give smartphone users free use of their hotspots. Despite all of that, there will always be dead zones, or ares of oversaturation. You can't get something for nothing, and you certainly can't get it overnight.



    Grow up, and stop whining like an obnoxious teenager.



    I'm not the one you're calling names, but I'll answer your first question nevertheless. Me, I want AT&T to stop selling phones in markets where its service is already strained to the point of basically not working during peak hours.



    As an existing AT&T customer, I'm angry that my service continues to get worse and worse (I went three days this weekend literally unable to make a single call from home, due to a large festival nearby). New customers have to be at least that angry, finding that their new phone really only works during off-peak hours, and drops plenty of calls even then.



    The responsible thing for AT&T to do would be to say "cripes, we way underestimated demand, we're working as fast as we can to improve our network, and in the meantime we'll limit sales in the most affected markets so it at least doesn't get worse for everyone."



    I think it's reasonable to blame AT&T for past failures, though it does little constructive good. I think it's very, very reasonable to blame them for continuing to make the problem worse with every phone they sell into some markets. It's insane that they're so focused on short term revenue that they'll destroy their reputation and drive long-term customers away to get it. That's' terrible business.
  • Reply 18 of 36
    ortort Posts: 39member
    AT&Ts 3G speeds in St. Louis are absolutely PATHETIC.



    I typically get 100k down and up. We are supposedly paying for 3,000 down on the so called "fastest" 3G network around.



    If $30 a month is supposed to cover 3000 down, I think I might start sending them $1 a month for my 100 down.



    I'll pay for what they give me and we'll see how they like it.
  • Reply 19 of 36
    I recommend _reducing_ download speeds in NYC.
  • Reply 20 of 36
    mactelmactel Posts: 1,275member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by donlphi View Post


    Oh well... \



    Let them work-out the network problems in those other cities. I'd rather not be the beta with dropped calls and service issues. Let some other city cut their teeth with the new bandwidth tech.
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