Exclusive: Pink Danger leaks from Microsoft's Windows Phone

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  • Reply 101 of 133
    justflybobjustflybob Posts: 1,337member
    Microsoft on the wane?



    Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of guys and gals (snicker, snicker).
  • Reply 102 of 133
    justflybobjustflybob Posts: 1,337member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


    Do you have anything to contribute other than quasi-racist negative remarks?



    Yes. He failed to mention she was fat and ugly!



    (Just kidding.)



    Now, off with their racist heads!
  • Reply 103 of 133
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by newbee View Post


    I'm probably way off in my thinking here but I can see a future scenario where "cloud computing " has a much more dominate position in any desktop OS necessity ( all computers could "borrow" OS and necessary apps from the cloud and not "carry them" on their computer.) If that was, in fact, to happen, I think M$ market share wouldn't be worth very much whereas Apple's hardware sales would hold it in a strong position. Thoughts?



    Cloud computing is acceptable for many apps.



    Some Power apps, e.g. A/V compositing, rotoscoping, interactive painting/drawing, etc. probably will require (for the foreseeable future) that the data as well as the app reside on the local computer/network, rather than on the cloud.



    Then there are the mobile OSes...



    I see the mobile OS being the fastest growing segment. As mobile hardware becomes more capable, many applications and their data will no longer need to be tethered to the desktop.



    To a large extent mobiles will take advantage of repositories of Cloud Computing for apps and data. As mobile bandwidth increases this becomes even more practical.





    There is at least one more relationship between OSes. Think of a mobile Tablet with a MultiTouch OS. This could be a refinement of the iPhone/iPod Touch hardware, and the iPhone OS (we'll call it Tablet OS).



    Now, add to the Tablet OS the ability to recognize a nearby computer (Bonjour) and subordinate itself and the Tablet hardware as a peripheral to the other computer-- so, [almost] without doing anything, the computer has a MultiTouch display as an I/O device (additional display, stylus and finger tablet input, virtual keyboards, etc).



    For example, you sit down at your computer, and your mobile automatically becomes a graphic tablet peripheral where you can precision draw to your hearts content.



    At the same time, the nearby computer's OS (or an app) could subordinate itself and its hardware to act as a peripheral to the Tablet (display, keyboard, printers, scanners, midi, camera, videoCam, etc).



    For example, you sit down at your computer and its large display automatically becomes a light table peripheral to your mobile where you can manipulate photos to your hearts content.



    It's a synergy!



    *
  • Reply 104 of 133
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by justflybob View Post


    Yes. He failed to mention she was fat and ugly!



    (Just kidding.)



    Now, off with their racist heads!



    I don't get the point of stuff like this. I sometimes post negative things when I'm mad or the person I'm replying to is being an idiot or aggressive themselves, but everyone does that. That's human nature and part of the reality of debates.



    But what makes a person like yourself (and the first poster if actually a different person), bother to come to a forum, log-in, and compose such off-topic hateful drivel? I mean you have to go to a reasonable amount of trouble, but your purpose is seemingly just to make a crappy remark at someone else's expense??? Someone you don't even know.



    On the basis of her name, or how she looks?



    I don't get it. Even if I live another hundred years I don't think I will ever understand that kind of mind-set.
  • Reply 105 of 133
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,845member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post


    Actually he did not get recognize for it since the government in its infinite wisdom did not want anyone to know they had the technology to crack the Enigma code, this was kept top secret for 50 years. ALong with him there was another guy can not remember his name but he was a magician who developed camouflage technology during WWII that was so successful that it was still be used into recent times and is still classified and he was never allow to talk about it or get recognized for what he did. Most people who develop these military technologies can never talk about it and usually cause the life long grief.



    The Brits are funny about their official secrets. It was revealed a few years back that RSA type encryption was invented by British government cryptographers but kept it secret..



    "...it was revealed in December 1997 in a talk given by Clifford Cocks that he, along with James Ellis, and Malcolm Williamson, all employees of the British GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATIONS HEADQUARTERS (GCHQ) had, as the result of classified research, discovered all the fundamental techniques of public key cryptography by 1975, some three years before the Diffe-Hellerman key exchange or RSA technique were developed. Because of who they were and where they worked it took another 25 years before they put their hands up."



    source: www.cypher.com.au/crypto_history.htm.
  • Reply 106 of 133
    justflybobjustflybob Posts: 1,337member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


    I don't get the point of stuff like this. I sometimes post negative things when I'm mad or the person I'm replying to is being an idiot or aggressive themselves, but everyone does that. That's human nature and part of the reality of debates.



    But what makes a person like yourself (and the first poster if actually a different person), bother to come to a forum, log-in, and compose such off-topic hateful drivel? I mean you have to go to a reasonable amount of trouble, but your purpose is seemingly just to make a crappy remark at someone else's expense??? Someone you don't even know.



    On the basis of her name, or how she looks?



    I don't get it. Even if I live another hundred years I don't think I will ever understand that kind of mind-set.



    There was and is no mind-set. And I don't know anyone here any more than you do.



    My only point was to lighten the mood a little. Yes, the fact that their name is Ho should have no bearing on the discussion. Just as whether they are attractive or not, slim or fat, etc. etc.



    But I've seen far worse posted here and elsewhere without anyone posting anything to counter it.



    This is an Apple rumors forum. It is not a course in civilized discourse.



    If I offended you? Meh. Put me on your "ignore" list and move on.



    Life is way too short to spend this much time on one post.
  • Reply 107 of 133
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,845member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


    I really like this assessment of Steve Balmer. I think it's spot on.

    The fact that he's "a salesman at heart" (as he himself admits), is well known, but the idea that he is a sort of bamboozler who has succeeded mainly due to the ignorance of the simple country folk he sells his "tonic" to is priceless.



    It is the height of self-delusion when a salesman who is selling a monopolized product takes credit for the success of his company.



    This is the Microsoft self-delusion that everybody seems to see except the suits in Redmond. Even though every product that they've made that is not a monopoly has been dismal failures. That includes Xbox (until it earns back the billions of dollars wasted on it and makes a few more billions on top of those).
  • Reply 108 of 133
    justflybobjustflybob Posts: 1,337member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


    This is actually the exact way you are supposed to use quotes.

    I guess you failed Grade 8 English class eh?



    And how, exactly, does this further the supposed discussion of Microsoft's Windows Phone?
  • Reply 109 of 133
    500 people worked for a year and a half and spent hundreds of millions of dollars and the whole thing fails? Brilliant. MS has a massive R&D budget and yet year after year fails to deliver any real breakthrough technology.
  • Reply 110 of 133
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


    I believe that when the historians look back on this early computer period they will see Microsoft, and specifically Balmer as exactly that. Business focussed "hucksters" that actually held back the development of the computer rather than contributed to it, and who were only successful due to some real old fashioned arm-twisting, and the general ignorance of the times.



    I highly disagree. Microsoft's problem is not the pursuit of profit. The desire to sell products is the reason why companies exist in the first place. Ballmer's problem isn't that he's a salesman. Steve Jobs is a salesman. All executives are salesmen, whether they want to be or not. That's the nature of their job. They're all trying to sell you something. There is nothing wrong with that.



    Ballmer's problem isn't that he's trying to sell you something, it's that he's terrible at it. Steve Jobs is an excellent salesman: products are designed with a clear purpose and presented as solutions to problems. When Steve Jobs gets on a stage, he talks about perceived problems, why they're problems, and the thought process behind Apple's attempt to fix it, then he shows you the product. Steve Ballmer gets on a stage and talks about branding, tie-in, "developers developers developers," and other focus-grouped marketing language that has nothing to do with the nature of the product being put on store shelves.



    I think it's fair to say that Microsoft is holding computing progress back, but that has less to do with the desire to turn a profit--you think Steve Jobs doesn't want to make money?--and more with Ballmer's failure to orient the company towards producing great products. Steve Ballmer's Microsoft is focused on trying to protect the market share it gained in the 1990s, not about improving that market share. That's the real problem.



    Ultimately, I think the top three layers of management at Microsoft all need to be fired. Well, maybe they can keep Steven Sinofsky, since he got Office back on track and seems to have given Windows some much-needed direction as well. But Microsoft's internal fiefdoms and the people who maintain them need to go.
  • Reply 111 of 133
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,845member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by desides View Post


    Ultimately, I think the top three layers of management at Microsoft all need to be fired. . . But Microsoft's internal fiefdoms and the people who maintain them need to go.



    Ross Perot tried to get the same thing done at GM when he joined its board back in the 80's. Of course the suits at GM didn't want their perks, pleasures, and powers curtailed so they eventually kicked him off the board. That was the last serious attempt to fix GM. And we all know what happened after that.



    This is Microsoft's trajectory. They need to find their Ross Perot but unlike GM they have to listen to him. But you and I know this will never happen. They're too arrogant and too busy slapping each other on the back, congratulating themselves for the great salesmanship they displayed in selling monopolized products.



    The only thing we need to complete the picture is a Michael Moore documentary entitled "Ballmer & Me".
  • Reply 112 of 133
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post


    This is Microsoft's trajectory. They need to find their Ross Perot but unlike GM they have to listen to him. But you and I know this will never happen. They're too arrogant and too busy slapping each other on the back, congratulating themselves for the great salesmanship they displayed in selling monopolized products.



    There's always hop that Microsoft's board will wake up. Maybe.



    And GM's problem was never really its (mis)management. They could overcome that. Their problem was and is the nature of the union contracts they signed in the 1950s. But that's another thread.



    Quote:

    The only thing we need to complete the picture is a Michael Moore documentary entitled "Ballmer & Me".



    Moore doesn't make documentaries. But that's also another thread.
  • Reply 113 of 133
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by justflybob View Post


    Yes. He failed to mention she was fat and ugly!



    (Just kidding.)



    Now, off with their racist heads!



    That's really very funny.
  • Reply 114 of 133
    Really interesting timing on this article. Microsoft has lost all SideKick customer data this weekend and further stated there's no hope of recovering it. Looks like this will be the single biggest cloud computing failure in the history of the Internet.
  • Reply 115 of 133
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,334member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I would argue that Vista SP1 is Vista done right, though Win7 has a new look and streamlined features that are Mac-like which is why I prefer it.



    I don't think it should be free because how could MS charge for OEM copies then and if it was priced the same as SL then they would have to less than thagvfor OEM copies. The vendors could then just buy the retail version an push OS support to MS. If the market supports $300 for a retail version of Windows then so be it. I would pay that, but I support their right to do so.



    I can't agree with Ireland's stance that SL is not worth the cost. I've been using it as my primary OS since about March. I'm impressed at how much they have redone and how well they hve set themselves up for the future.



    It's difficult to hold up your argument when the head of the company disagrees, and says the product isn't much of an upgrade.



    Ballmer knows that Vista had a lot of problems, even with the fixes, there were fundamental problems.



    So all that 7 is doing it rectifying the errors of Vista. So, sure, you like it more, so will most Vista users.



    But that's not the point, is it?



    But inside, the OS is the same. All that's been done is to rectify the GUI and cut down on the massive frustration with the secutiry shell.



    The "new" OS was supposed to be Longhorn. but that project failed, so thats why both Vista and 7 are just a subset of Server 2003. no innovation at all.



    With this, MS harkened back, not forwards. No restructuring, no major new API's of note. Nothing.



    They took two years to fix the mistakes made with Vista.



    This is nothing to built upon for the future.



    We're already hearing rumors of 8, and even 9.
  • Reply 116 of 133
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,334member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    Is it really that difficult?



    Is it something that could be improved by writing some kind of migration assistant?



    Is there some virtualization app on Windows 7, analogous to Parallels, where you could run XP and Win 7 to ease the migration?



    If none of this is practical, wouldn't it be preferable to by a Mac and VM app of choice and run them both along with OS X?



    Or, do you see people just migrating XP to OS X rather than to Win 7?



    *



    There is a company, I don't remember the name right now, that does off a program that will take care of this for people.



    But it costs $50. So that's another $50 on top of the upgrade price.



    I think MS should just buy them, and include it, but it's not likely.



    Look what has to be done.



    You have to back up your files, which MS can help with.



    You then have to wipe your disk.



    Then install the upgrade.



    Then restore your files.



    Then install your programs from their original install disks, or other original downloads.



    Then put in any serial numbers and passwords. Last, hopefully, you need to update any programs that need it, and set your prefs back.



    Easy, right?



    Its tough to predict what people will do. but so many PC people wait to upgrade the OS by getting new machines when they need them, that I don't know the percentage.



    but if there is a lot of pent up frustration over Vista, by those still running XP because of it, then they may just not want to bother with 7.



    If I were Apple, I would have some new Ads showing how much work it is upgrading from XP.



    On the other hand, It's easier moving from XP to OS X. Apple helps with that more than MS helps.
  • Reply 117 of 133
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,334member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    Cloud computing is acceptable for many apps.



    Some Power apps, e.g. A/V compositing, rotoscoping, interactive painting/drawing, etc. probably will require (for the foreseeable future) that the data as well as the app reside on the local computer/network, rather than on the cloud.



    Then there are the mobile OSes...



    I see the mobile OS being the fastest growing segment. As mobile hardware becomes more capable, many applications and their data will no longer need to be tethered to the desktop.



    To a large extent mobiles will take advantage of repositories of Cloud Computing for apps and data. As mobile bandwidth increases this becomes even more practical.





    There is at least one more relationship between OSes. Think of a mobile Tablet with a MultiTouch OS. This could be a refinement of the iPhone/iPod Touch hardware, and the iPhone OS (we'll call it Tablet OS).



    Now, add to the Tablet OS the ability to recognize a nearby computer (Bonjour) and subordinate itself and the Tablet hardware as a peripheral to the other computer-- so, [almost] without doing anything, the computer has a MultiTouch display as an I/O device (additional display, stylus and finger tablet input, virtual keyboards, etc).



    For example, you sit down at your computer, and your mobile automatically becomes a graphic tablet peripheral where you can precision draw to your hearts content.



    At the same time, the nearby computer's OS (or an app) could subordinate itself and its hardware to act as a peripheral to the Tablet (display, keyboard, printers, scanners, midi, camera, videoCam, etc).



    For example, you sit down at your computer and its large display automatically becomes a light table peripheral to your mobile where you can manipulate photos to your hearts content.



    It's a synergy!



    *



    I have nothing against the concept of cloud computing, but it still has a ways to go.



    I don't think I'll get used to the idea of my personal files being backed up on other people's servers. I know my own network here at home is pretty secure, but whose would I trust?



    With several instances of companies backing up people's data having major security breakdowns, and others losing data, it doesn't seem like such a good idea. Maybe sometime in the future, but when?



    With storage dropping in price and increasing is size at the rate it is, it's better storing locally for most people. If it is really important, a drive could be stored somewhere else, or backed up to DVD's or Blu-Ray.



    Also, only certain kinds of programs will work at sufficient speed over the net. Others still need to reside locally.



    If your net connection drops, as happens, they you are screwed until it comes back. So that needs to be improved.



    Also, if companies are going to be allowed to throttle bandwidth, which still might be happening, then what does that do to game players and others who need bandwidth?



    I believe that much has to be worked before this becomes a reality for many people. There is very little of it going on now, so the repercussions have not really begun.
  • Reply 118 of 133
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,334member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lopsided View Post


    500 people worked for a year and a half and spent hundreds of millions of dollars and the whole thing fails? Brilliant. MS has a massive R&D budget and yet year after year fails to deliver any real breakthrough technology.



    This has actually been a major criticism of MS.



    This year, MS's R&D budget is $9.5 billion. That's right $9.5 billion. Not a typo.



    That's the largest R&D budget in the world.



    But what do they have to show for it? Very little.



    They say that they will hold the budget for next year to that number.



    I can't imagine where it goes. It's true that they work on more fundamental research than Apple does, but still.
  • Reply 119 of 133
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,334member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by desides View Post


    And GM's problem was never really its (mis)management. They could overcome that. Their problem was and is the nature of the union contracts they signed in the 1950s. But that's another thread.



    That's only partly true.



    I'm old enough to remember the first Japanese cars coming into this country.



    People laughed at them. They were small, ugly, had little in the way of American conveniences, etc.



    but some people bought them, because they were cheap, and used little gas.



    In the latter '70's when gas prices rose a good amount, people bought more of them.



    The American makers said that this would pass, but it didn't.



    Over the years, while there were enough people buying big, expensive fuel guzzlers to keep the big three happy, their marketshare was eroding. In the '80's, they made so much money, they thought everything was fine.



    But their cars still had many more defects than the Japanese autos.



    They've now had almost 40 years to bring their cars above in quality, but they've failed to do so. They're pretty close these days, but they don't beat many foreign cars.



    This is a failure in management.



    EVERY problem a company has, is a failure in management. That also includes negotiating with their workers.



    If the car companies were still selling the percentages they were, then union contracts would be unimportant to a great extent.



    Don't forget that GM had a 43% marketshare. Now, it's down to what?



    Another problem is one many industries in the US have. It's that US consumers have no national loyalty to their home made products.



    In many countries such as Japan, S. Korea, and many European countries, and the Chinese, people will be willing to pay more for home made products, even if they are inferior quality, something that they don't even have the opportunity to find out.



    The governments in those countries have made it difficult for foreign companies to get a foothold, and do much more than just "encourage" people to buy local.



    We don't do that here.
  • Reply 120 of 133
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,334member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SinisterJoe View Post


    Really interesting timing on this article. Microsoft has lost all SideKick customer data this weekend and further stated there's no hope of recovering it. Looks like this will be the single biggest cloud computing failure in the history of the Internet.



    That's why I don't trust it yet.
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