General diagnostics help - things are crashing!

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
I just got Logic Studio and it's big program with lots of parts to it and before I install it I wanted to make sure things are cool with my iMac. It's been crashing a fair amount recently. I called Apple and the girl (really nice) in the general section said it's probably good to take the imac to an apple store or apple authorized tecnhnician (and she gave me several in the area) and have them give it a once over. Then I spoke with a guy in the pro apps department (nasty and bored) who said the thing to do is:



1) Try running disk utility from a system bootup disk (Leopard, wchih I have around here somewhere)

2) Do an Archive and Install from the Leopard Disk (and then get all the updates etc). which will just replace the system, not anything else.

3) Do an erase and install from the Leopard disk, which will mean having to reinstall any third party apps.



Whadaya think?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    Can you please post some more info about how your imac is crashing.



    If it crashes with certain apps or system related crashes.



    This will help give a better answer to what could be the cause of the crashes you see.
  • Reply 2 of 18
    It crashes with a variety of programs. Garageband, iTunes (the programs I tend to use the most). Sometimes just the program itself crashes and quits, sometimes the whole system freezes up and I have to reboot.



    who
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rob_06 View Post


    Can you please post some more info about how your imac is crashing.



    If it crashes with certain apps or system related crashes.



    This will help give a better answer to what could be the cause of the crashes you see.



  • Reply 3 of 18
    Before you do anything else... first make a backup!



    Next: that tech guy seems about right. But you won't neccessarily have to do all three. They are strategies in order of severity. Start with no.1 and then see how your Mac behaves (after restarting of course). If that doesn't change anything you may have to go to step 2. Etc.



    See if you can run a hardware test from a bootable external disk or DVD.



    BTW, have you repaired your permissions?
  • Reply 4 of 18
    I have repaired permissions a few times over the last few months as these problems have persisted.increased. I just did it again last night, and will see how it behaves over the next couple days. Or I might go right to trying to repair disk permissions from a bootup system disk first..., then move on to arhive and replace if things don't improve...



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokcet Scientist View Post


    Before you do anything else... first make a backup!



    Next: that tech guy seems about right. But you won't neccessarily have to do all three. They are strategies in order of severity. Start with no.1 and then see how your Mac behaves (after restarting of course). If that doesn't change anything you may have to go to step 2. Etc.



    See if you can run a hardware test from a bootable external disk or DVD.



    BTW, have you repaired your permissions?



  • Reply 5 of 18
    My system currently is Leopard, 10.5.8. Can I do these processes with a Snow Leopard disk? Or should it be the same system I currently have?
  • Reply 6 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Soundhound View Post


    My system currently is Leopard, 10.5.8. Can I do these processes with a Snow Leopard disk? Or should it be the same system I currently have?



    You could try a Snow Leopard upgrade, but if it were me, I'd try the Archive and Install with Leopard first. You might find that some of your applications (Logic Studio?) don't work, if they relied on installing kernel extensions. But if that's the case and the Mac otherwise runs properly afterwards, then you'll know something.
  • Reply 7 of 18
    What if I only have a Snow Leopard Disk, and no Leopard disk? Do it anyway? Or see it I can borrow a Leopard Disk from someone?





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    You could try a Snow Leopard upgrade, but if it were me, I'd try the Archive and Install with Leopard first. You might find that some of your applications (Logic Studio?) don't work, if they relied on installing kernel extensions. But if that's the case and the Mac otherwise runs properly afterwards, then you'll know something.



  • Reply 8 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Soundhound View Post


    What if I only have a Snow Leopard Disk, and no Leopard disk? Do it anyway? Or see it I can borrow a Leopard Disk from someone?



    I did assume you had a Leopard install disc since you are running Leopard. Personally I don't see a big downside to doing a Snow Leopard install. The Archive and Install option is no longer available as of Snow Leopard, so you have to go with the standard method -- which is supposed to segregate incompatible software when you install it. I'd also check to find out if the version of Logic Studio you have installed is Snow Leopard compatible.
  • Reply 9 of 18
    I haven;t installed Logic yet and just purchased it, so I'm guessing it works with Snow Leopard, but I will check, thanks! What has replaced Archive and Install in Snow Leopard? That was the step I was hoping I wouldn;t have to go past: First try running disk utility from a system bootup disk, then try archive and install...





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    I did assume you had a Leopard install disc since you are running Leopard. Personally I don't see a big downside to doing a Snow Leopard install. The Archive and Install option is no longer available as of Snow Leopard, so you have to go with the standard method -- which is supposed to segregate incompatible software when you install it. I'd also check to find out if the version of Logic Studio you have installed is Snow Leopard compatible.



  • Reply 10 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Soundhound View Post


    I haven;t installed Logic yet and just purchased it, so I'm guessing it works with Snow Leopard, but I will check, thanks! What has replaced Archive and Install in Snow Leopard? That was the step I was hoping I wouldn;t have to go past: First try running disk utility from a system bootup disk, then try archive and install...



    The standard upgrade. Supposedly, this does much of what the Archive and Install option used to do. Of course you can also have the Erase and Install (nuke and pave) option, but I rarely suggest this unless we're sure nothing else works.
  • Reply 11 of 18
    The only install disks I can find are 10.4.7, and I'm running 10.5.8. Can I do it with those? Or do I need to find Leopard install disks?
  • Reply 12 of 18
    Found the leopard disk , never mind



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Soundhound View Post


    The only install disks I can find are 10.4.7, and I'm running 10.5.8. Can I do it with those? Or do I need to find Leopard install disks?



  • Reply 13 of 18
    Now I'm trying to run Disk Utility from the Leopard install disk, but the only thing I can seem to do with it is Archive and Install, or Erase and Install, which is installing the system. Do you know how to just boot up from the install disk and use that system? thanks!





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Soundhound View Post


    Found the leopard disk , never mind



  • Reply 14 of 18
    Figured it out. I think. There is a Disk Utility on the install disk, and I'm using that now.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Soundhound View Post


    Now I'm trying to run Disk Utility from the Leopard install disk, but the only thing I can seem to do with it is Archive and Install, or Erase and Install, which is installing the system. Do you know how to just boot up from the install disk and use that system? thanks!



  • Reply 15 of 18
    I have a basic Disk Utility question. When I do verify disk permissions, and then repair disk permissions, how do I know if everything's okay? there's generally a long list of files in the scrollable window, some of which say, xxxxx file has been modified and will not be repaired... as well as others. But once I run Repair Disk Permissions, it ends up saying 'Repair Disk Permissions Complete.' Does this mean everything's ok, or does it suggest things are not well, and I should do an Archive and Install?



    thanks!
  • Reply 16 of 18
    That means your drive is okay, no problems were found with the media or disk directory.
  • Reply 17 of 18
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    So do you know what a kernel panic looks like? You say you get system freezes and you have to reboot, does it involve a dialogue box telling you to do that?



    What machine are you on? With what peripherals connected? How much memory, have you ever upgraded the memory, and how much free HD space?



    Frequent kernel panics can be a hardware problem, something simple as poorly seated ram chips. It can happen when your disc gets close to being full. It can happen with a flakey USB hub. If you have a hardware diagnostics disc, run that.



    You might also try creating a new user account and running under that for a while, to see if you still have the same problems. If not, you know you have a particular software configuration problem, possibly a corrupted pref file.
  • Reply 18 of 18
    Take it to the Apple Store.
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