Apple iPhone eats up 50% share of all mobile data traffic globally

13»

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 54
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    I did not read it that way at all. They're focusing on the biggest changes, which are a 44% drop for RIM, and dramatic gains for Android (and within that, a lot of traction for Droid, apparently). Apple's going from 43% to 50% is viewed as less spectacular.



    But your observation says, "let's wait and see how objective they are," and I agree with that.



    That's true of one metric (over the last six months), but by another (month to month) the only big mover is Apple, increasing 6.9% and 5.5% respectively, while everyone else was largely flat or in decline.
  • Reply 42 of 54
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    If you go over then how are you charged? That sounds reasonable though.



    Frankly, I never bothered to inquire. Even with heavy usage I barely break the 400mb mark. But for those times I hit Fallsview in Niagara Falls for an extended stay and need to do work online without paying the hotel for access (meaning 3G tethering using my iPhone and MBP), I'm comforted by the fact that I can pretty much go nuts and never even appraoch my monthly limit.



    But I DO know how much it costs to cancel your 6gb data plan if you ever decide you don't want it: around $300 CDN. I assume such a charge is standard in the industry, at least in Canada, or so I'm told by a friend of mine who is a middle-manager (GTA marketing) with Rogers wireless.
  • Reply 43 of 54
    Come on, "Prince" I think you are missing the point that this indicates that iPhone users are using them as true mobile computers and web devices and Apple's attention to usability has played a big part in this. Considering AT&Ts substandard network, the amount of people using their iPhones this way is even more impressive. Thank goodness I live in a country that is allowing more providers to offer the iPhone.



    I do, however, have to compliment you on not baffling people with your usual "incomprehensgraphs" and presenting us with a clear break down of the data.
  • Reply 44 of 54
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    Nice, it is really amazing how steve was right when he said iphone was at least 5 years ahead of the competition. It is and no one can even come close. Though I think Google will be up that in a year or so.
  • Reply 45 of 54
    kenckenc Posts: 195member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    Which means they are counting wi-fi, which doesn't really count as mobile data



    They count the touch unless the chart specifically states "Smartphone". For example, go to either Page 7 or 8 of their October report. There on the left, they detail ad requests by mfr and device, clearly including the touch; HOWEVER, just to the right, where the show a pie chart, for Smartphone traffic, they EXCLUDE the touch. Very confusing and not at all clear.



    What's interesting in the Smartphone pie chart is that they indicate ad requests by non-Smartphones is about 56%, while ad requests by Smartphones is only 44%. They then take the iPhone ad request percentage of 22.4%, and divide that into the Smartphone share of 44% and get roughly 50% of all Smartphone ad requests are due to the iPhone. That does NOT include any ad requests by the touch.
  • Reply 46 of 54
    kenckenc Posts: 195member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    So according to AdMod, they











    So they are only tracking ads in a small subset of webpages, and some applications, so not really a true representation of "mobile data". And their applications are only iPhone and Android, again, not a true representation of mobile application use. And then they say they don't count the iPod Touch, but they include it in their reports, which one is it?



    Maybe you could form some trend from it, but I'm not sure how useful that trend actually is



    So, just to be clear, the 50% you refer to DOES NOT include touch data, as they break out the subset of Smartphone requests as only 44% of global ad requests.
  • Reply 47 of 54
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    I wonder if using their main web page and first three pages of their PDF report to go into granular detail on the fortunes of Android and RIM, complete with nice big pie charts and some narrative cheerleading, while relegating Apple to an unremarked and much reduced status on subsequent PDF pages (this despite the fact that one would think that a 50% global traffic share might inspire a passing mention by a mobile ad tracking company) counts as "bending over backward."



    Read the article again.



    "Focus on fractionalization



    To keep things interesting, AdMob virtually ignored the iPhone in its October report to examine the model distribution within the BlackBerry and Android platforms."



    The success of the iPhone is a foregone conclusion, so they go on to "zoom in" in the fractionalization and the model distribution which is indeed interesting.
  • Reply 48 of 54
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post


    Read the article again.



    "Focus on fractionalization



    To keep things interesting, AdMob virtually ignored the iPhone in its October report to examine the model distribution within the BlackBerry and Android platforms."



    The success of the iPhone is a foregone conclusion, so they go on to "zoom in" in the fractionalization and the model distribution which is indeed interesting.



    What I found perplexing while perusing through previous Admob's Metrics Reports, is why they didn't continuecompare the growth rate of the Android vs iPhone as they had done and rationalized in the March 2009 summary of the report.*



    Of particular interest was the reference to netbooks. Raising the question, do they or where they expected to influence the report?



    Quote:

    March 2009 Metrics Report

    The much faster iPhone growth is not surprising given the far larger installed base of iPhones and the huge marketing push from Apple. In March 2009, we received 8 times more traffic from iPhones in the US today than Android. When you layer in the worldwide footprint, and the fact that the iPod touch is also there, you can see how huge of a headstart the iPhone platform has.



    However when you consider that there are 1-2 million of the G1 sold in the US compared to the approximately 15 million of the iPhone sold in the US today, the ratio makes sense. As more Android phones launch around the world and the Android OS moves to other devices such as netbooks and Mobile Internet Devices, this gap is likely to close.



    More interesting, and maybe it is just too early in the morning to understand the connection, but the report starts off with a link that doesn't seem to make sense, i.e., "At our iPhone meetup earlier this month…." Well worth the read



    Not that I am a complaining with what appears to be a mislink and out of context to this subject directly. In fact, it seems to put in perspective what many of us developers feel about developing iPhone apps. Note however, it may have already been discussed and if so, I apologize for this intrusion.



    * http://metrics.admob.com/2009/04/mar...etrics-report/
  • Reply 49 of 54
    Oh ho ho!

    You're not so good at math!



    Symbian: 20,722,052 / 41,444,103 ~= 50%

    RIM: 10,361,026 / 41,444,103 ~= 25%

    Apple: 4,558,851 / 41,444,103 ~= 11%

    WM: 2,901,087 / 41,444,103 ~= 7%

    Android:1,243,323 / 41,444,103 ~= 3%

    Other: 1,657,764 / 41,444,103 ~= 4%
  • Reply 50 of 54
    Did you really have a look on the image posted in the article?



    You'd have seen that these numbers look quite tricky and obviously wrong.



    Look the Units sales Q3 2009 as reported in the graphics:



    if Symbian sales were 20 722 052, it should be 50% since 20 722 052 * 2 = 41 444 104

    if RIM sales were really 10 361 026, it should then be 25% since 10 361 026 * 4 = 41 444 104



    All percentages are wrong! Maybe the numbers are also? It looks weird they are just doubles. I don't know if AdMob is really reliable, but we surely should be suspicious about this article
  • Reply 51 of 54
    pxtpxt Posts: 683member
    If iPhones use 50% of mobile data traffic, imagine the impact if they implemented Flash.
  • Reply 52 of 54
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,464member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ensign Pulver View Post


    And these numbers don't even include iPod Touch users.



    Actually they do.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Magic_Al View Post


    Wi-fi doesn't count in this measurement I guess.



    Actually it does.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post


    Would we be looking for another source had Apple purchased AdMob or would you feel equally skeptical using AdMob as a means of measuring global mobile data traffic?



    AdMob doesn't measure global mobile data traffic.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    Did either you or Daniel actually read the report, they actually split the iPod touch out in their figures, so this data must include wi-fi access



    Exactly.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post


    That can't be right-- 24% of all Android traffic or 24% of all smart phone traffic? Either way, it is pretty impressive, but I can't imagine Verizon wouldn't be having problems if their total data usage went up 30%.



    24% of all Android traffic which was 20% total. This means that Droid has 5% of all ad requests from AdMob in only a couple weeks. Those are some big numbers. That is 10% of iPhone in less than a month.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post


    It's not "mobile data traffic", it's "mobile AD traffic" and it's skewed toward iPhone an Android because those are the two platforms where in app ads exists.



    Exactly. People don't realize that when you have Pandora open and it is asking you if you want to buy this brand of car or consider this brand of soap in that little banner right above the controls, that is ad-mob. It is also going to skew towards any platform that has more apps as well.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    Which means they are counting wi-fi, which doesn't really count as mobile data



    It counts as mobile data as in mobile computing platforms and cell phones. What it does not count for (as myself and others have noted for months) is any metric of cellular data use.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KenC View Post


    They count the touch unless the chart specifically states "Smartphone". For example, go to either Page 7 or 8 of their October report. There on the left, they detail ad requests by mfr and device, clearly including the touch; HOWEVER, just to the right, where the show a pie chart, for Smartphone traffic, they EXCLUDE the touch. Very confusing and not at all clear.



    What's interesting in the Smartphone pie chart is that they indicate ad requests by non-Smartphones is about 56%, while ad requests by Smartphones is only 44%. They then take the iPhone ad request percentage of 22.4%, and divide that into the Smartphone share of 44% and get roughly 50% of all Smartphone ad requests are due to the iPhone. That does NOT include any ad requests by the touch.



    It would be interesting to see that clarified. They do present data from the iPod touch but also cite statistics from the iPhone OS which includes the Touch.
  • Reply 53 of 54
    1st1st Posts: 443member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post


    That can't be right-- 24% of all Android traffic or 24% of all smart phone traffic? Either way, it is pretty impressive, but I can't imagine Verizon wouldn't be having problems if their total data usage went up 30%.



    compression problem? why so large? by the way,



    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?p...d=aGpF1jDNbhEE
  • Reply 54 of 54
    Whether or not there are issues with AddMob's assumptions on the numbers, and given their questionable math, there is one underlying statement that these numbers do make.



    If you provide a user with a viable and well deigned interface, that makes it easy to go online, people will, and in droves. I use to have own a Motorola Razor, it supposedly went on line, but if any of you have had the pleasure of trying that on said phone, it was everything but pleasurable.



    Now I have an iPhone 3GS, and I am online more than I want to admit, why; because its easy, not hard not painful easy.



    Mobile carriers be warned, this is just the beginning, as more companies will realize that a good web browsing experience is key, in any phone, if you want to make money. With this, comes customers who will devour bandwidth, so they had better get a move on and make capacity as fast as they can.
Sign In or Register to comment.