New year brings faster approvals for Apple's App Store developers

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Various developers have said Apple's turnaround time in approving applications for its iPhone and iPod touch App Store has significantly improved since the start of 2010.



Developer Jared Judd, creator of the application "Cootie Lert," told AppleInsider that his software was approved by Apple in just 48 hours -- and it was submitted over the weekend.



"Submitted it on Saturday January 9th, and it got approved Monday January 11th," he wrote in an e-mail. "So one of the 2 days was a Sunday."



From Dec. 23 through Dec. 28, Apple disabled iTunes Connect, but since its return, developers have said Apple's performance has improved significantly.



"They have somehow gotten it down to a very very quick turnaround," Judd wrote. "I've heard a number of people say that it's been within 48 hours for them as well."



A similar story was relayed to TUAW, which quoted one developer who saw their application approved in less than three days. Previously, Atomic Cactus experienced wait times of two to three weeks.



It's quite a change from last summer, when stories of long delays and a lack of communication on Apple's part inspired Apple executive Phil Schiller to personally respond to some pundits and developers. The public moves were uncharacteristic of Apple, which is notorious for being a quiet, secretive company. But as bad publicity continued to grow, Schiller felt compelled to personally intervene.



Schiller revealed that the App Store has about 10,000 applications submitted every week, and said he feels the approval process guarantees a certain level of quality on the platform. He estimated that 10 percent of rejections are due to inappropriate content, while the other 90 percent represent "technical fixes" for bugs and similar issues.



In addition to placing effort into the public relations battle, Apple also attempted to make things easier for its development community. In September, the company introduced the App Store Resource Center, a private page for developers that shows how to prepare software for submission and details Apple's approval process. Months later, the company began allowing developers to view the approval status of submitted applications, and also partially automated the approval process.



Additionally, in December, one developer noted that Apple was taking a more lenient approach with software that technically violated the company's terms.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    I can confirm this first hand. I submitted 1 update and 1 new application on Dec. 30. One of the apps went into review within minutes.

    The update was approved on Jan. 2 and the new app - on Jan. 4. I thought this was due to the small number of submissions after Christmas but was surprised that the apps got approved during the holidays.
  • Reply 2 of 20
    It seems that the needs of developers and consumers are completely different.



    Developers, if they can, want an App Store approval process of 0 seconds. That means quicker access to the Brinks truck full of money.



    Consumers, on the other hand, want a process that protects them from rogue applications that jeopardize the privacy and integrity of their phone.
  • Reply 3 of 20
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member
    48 hours is an incredible turn-around considering the number of submissions and the complexity of the approval process.
  • Reply 4 of 20
    boogabooga Posts: 1,076member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post


    Consumers, on the other hand, want a process that protects them from rogue applications that jeopardize the privacy and integrity of their phone.



    It goes both ways. Consumers also want to receive updates that fix serious bugs in a reasonable timeframe, and those were getting delayed or even rejected over things that had been approved in the original release.
  • Reply 5 of 20
    The initial speed of the new approval process caught me off guard after over a year of multi-week approval times. The new speed is definitely a very good thing.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    Does this indicate that Apple merely has automated the process to such a degree that intervention is less necessary?
  • Reply 7 of 20
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Does this indicate that Apple merely has automated the process to such a degree that intervention is less necessary?



    That, or they've hired a bunch more evaluators.



    Of course, we know that this won't change the "Apple's draconian, locked down App Store/iron fisted control over what you get to run on your phone" meme, which will continue to appear in each and every discussion of the relative merits of the iPhone. It was never more than a canard, but once the "Apple sucks" crew get their teeth into something, there's really no letting go.
  • Reply 8 of 20
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Does this indicate that Apple merely has automated the process to such a degree that intervention is less necessary?





    Yes certainly software has a part in it, also the credibility of the developer I may assume.





    Still, zillions of apps and little are useful with no way to find the new jewels in the haystack.



    Like I really care since none work on my MacBook Pro.





    OS X UI as we know it, is doomed.





    All hail the closed UI iSlate OS and restriction of the App Store...



    yes, it's the new world coming and the fanboys will fight to defend Apple regardless.
  • Reply 9 of 20
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    Yes certainly software has a part in it, also the credibility of the developer I may assume.





    Still, zillions of apps and little are useful with no way to find the new jewels in the haystack.



    Like I really care since none work on my MacBook Pro.





    OS X UI as we know it, is doomed.





    All hail the closed UI iSlate OS and restriction of the App Store...



    yes, it's the new world coming and the fanboys will fight to defend Apple regardless.



    Just out of curiosity, how do you go about finding good software for your MacBook Pro?
  • Reply 10 of 20
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    Yes certainly software has a part in it, also the credibility of the developer I may assume.





    Still, zillions of apps and little are useful with no way to find the new jewels in the haystack.



    Like I really care since none work on my MacBook Pro.





    OS X UI as we know it, is doomed.





    All hail the closed UI iSlate OS and restriction of the App Store...



    yes, it's the new world coming and the fanboys will fight to defend Apple regardless.



    I imagine the cream eventually rises, but the rise up may be a bit slower.
  • Reply 11 of 20
    Does Apple allow you to submit an app for approval, get it approved and then you can choose exactly when to make it public?



    This would be part of a presentation or advertisement...
  • Reply 12 of 20
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,741member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    Y



    Still, zillions of apps and little are useful with no way to find the new jewels in the haystack.



    Like I really care since none work on my MacBook Pro.





    OS X UI as we know it, is doomed.





    All hail the closed UI iSlate OS and restriction of the App Store...



    yes, it's the new world coming and the fanboys will fight to defend Apple regardless.





    Tough to find good apps? Look at the categories. Look at the Top Apps. highest rated, for each cagegory. Yes, there are categories that have "Top Paid" and "Top Free" filters. Pay attention to the ratings of the first 10-20 that pop up. That's kinda your first clue that they might be good. If interested, click on the app, read the description and then read some reviews.







    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post




    Like I really care since none work on my MacBook Pro.



    Is it a problem that iPhone apps don't work on your Macbook Pro?
  • Reply 13 of 20
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post


    Developers, if they can, want an App Store approval process of 0 seconds. That means quicker access to the Brinks truck full of money.



    As an independent developer, I'm still waiting for Brinks to show up.



    While there are stories of App Store millionaires, you have to be exceptionally good to earn ANY sales, much less get rich and famous at it.



    Anyway, as for the approval process I can also vouch that it is dramatically faster. What took weeks last summer/fall now takes days. Definitely a Good Thing.
  • Reply 14 of 20
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Is it a problem that iPhone apps don't work on your Macbook Pro?



    for the terminally obtuse, yes.



    I find it amazing that people read his comments, let alone reply to him. I really wish people would't quote the entire post of obvious trolls - it's very annoying.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,198member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EUiPhoneUser View Post


    I can confirm this first hand. I submitted 1 update and 1 new application on Dec. 30. One of the apps went into review within minutes.

    The update was approved on Jan. 2 and the new app - on Jan. 4. I thought this was due to the small number of submissions after Christmas but was surprised that the apps got approved during the holidays.







    probably a combo of



    1. few apps submitted

    2. better testing tools to verify the apps won't crash

    3. more folks hired to review apps (perhaps due to an expected increase in approvals in the near future?)
  • Reply 16 of 20
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    for the terminally obtuse, yes.



    I find it amazing that people read his comments, let alone reply to him. I really wish people would't quote the entire post of obvious trolls - it's very annoying.



    My apologizes. I have stopped replying to MacTripper, ifail, jfanning and Brainless.
  • Reply 17 of 20
    icyfogicyfog Posts: 338member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    for the terminally obtuse, yes.



    I find it amazing that people read his comments, let alone reply to him. I really wish people would't quote the entire post of obvious trolls - it's very annoying.



    Agreed.
  • Reply 18 of 20
    ivan.rnn01ivan.rnn01 Posts: 1,822member
    Video capturing applications and updates for 3G seem being approved rocket fast now.
  • Reply 19 of 20
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,270member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    My apologizes. I have stopped replying to MacTripper, ifail, jfanning and Brainless.



    I don't care if people reply - it's just annoying with people (not you) quote their entire post. It's annoying general, but doubly so for the obvious trolls



    Anyway, I wonder if this will stop or tone down some of the whining about the approval process. I doubt it, but we'll see...
  • Reply 20 of 20
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    I don't care if people reply - it's just annoying with people (not you) quote their entire post. It's annoying general, but doubly so for the obvious trolls



    I do, which is why I usually say screw it after a few days and start replying to them if I am going to see their jibber jabber in other people’s replies.



    They were on, then I took them off (been replying to Jfanning and MacTripper tonight) and now they are all back on. It’s just so tedious and detracts from learning new things and having any real conversations.
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