One in five physicians likely to purchase Apple iPad - study

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  • Reply 21 of 184
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Huge. And it's not even on sale yet.
  • Reply 22 of 184
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by paxman View Post


    So to all the nay sayers I gotta give it to you - this thing is not for power users, not for professionals, not for business. Its a toy, nothing but an enlarged iPod Touch. A silly device for technically challenged incompetents. Yup, you're right. This thing will tank.



    Go back and play with your Windows 7 Netbook.



    Enlarged iPod Touch. Where have I read that before? Oh yeah, the 6,432 articles that have mentioned the same thing!



    You seem a bit challenged yourself buddy.
  • Reply 23 of 184
    isaidsoisaidso Posts: 750member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sojourner View Post


    I'd be interested in it too....I use Epocrates every day at work....but wish it could be more responsive (sometimes when the iPhone is busying doing other things - ie retrieving mail etc., it the other apps slow down). I'm sure new medical apps will follow.



    I am a little concerned that this expensive device will get damaged with so much daily use around the hospital/clinics etc...much easier to slip the iphone in my pocket when I'm walking out of the room, than forgetting it in the room (and risk it getting stolen).



    I wouldn't be. I'm sure there will be something like six-thousand-eight-hundred-and-thirty-nine different kinds of protective cases for the thing.

    This is going to be used in the field by the military, construction; you name it.
  • Reply 24 of 184
    isaidsoisaidso Posts: 750member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aep528 View Post


    Really? Here's the title of the article:

    "One in five physicians likely to purchase Apple iPad - study"



    And here is the first sentence:

    "More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one."



    And here is another statement later in the article:

    "Epocrates said that its medical program is currently in use by more than one in five physicians."



    Seems to me the article is pretty clear that it is talking about doctors.



    Is your problem with AI's wording in it's article, or with the study itself?
  • Reply 25 of 184
    But isn't the significance of this report about first year sales potential, rather than the college degree of the purchaser?
  • Reply 26 of 184
    walshbjwalshbj Posts: 864member
    So, doctors will be telling us we're going to die using a device configured by................iTunes.
  • Reply 27 of 184
    I'm not a doctor but I play one on TV. And when I need to look busy I use the iPad...
  • Reply 28 of 184
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,594member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by msantti View Post


    Go back and play with your Windows 7 Netbook.



    Enlarged iPod Touch. Where have I read that before? Oh yeah, the 6,432 articles that have mentioned the same thing!



    You seem a bit challenged yourself buddy.



    Oops. Forgot to add my sarky flag Thought it was kinda obvious
  • Reply 29 of 184
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by msantti View Post


    $150.00/year is some pretty serious change for a doctor. Hell, its the entire cost a single patient visit!



    Where did you find a doctor that only charges $150 per visit?
  • Reply 30 of 184
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,572member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by joseph1 View Post


    But isn't the significance of this report about first year sales potential, rather than the college degree of the purchaser?



    Yup. Lots of people immediately see how they can use the device to either replace/supplement something else they have, or to do things they can't do today.



    All because it is a "super-sized iPod Touch." ...that they understand how they will interact with before the device is even available.



    While a number of these applications never come to fruition based on past experience (still surprised more people don't use Apple TV's for digital signage), the iPad is largely a known-beast. I've heard some pretty cool ideas for applications that don't really work on the smaller screen.



    The one thing I haven't seen yet is protective cases that will make it suitable for some of the harsher environments.
  • Reply 31 of 184
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post


    ...



    There are maybe 800,000 doctors in the US. And you want me to believe a study that sampled 350 of them? And it's not even the SLIGHTEST bit random either. There's probably a strong bias to contact people who already OWN an iPhone and USE epocrates. And the only worthwhile version of Epocrates costs $150/year to use!



    I think you can easily see the confounding variables here. I have no doubt that doctors are certainly excited to see what the iPad could do for medicine (I'm a medical student, so I'd know), but to put out such silly numbers mocks the intelligence of anyone who can read.



    To put this into perspective, the #1 use of tablet PCs is for medical use (signatures and such). But to even make the claim that 20% of US doctors want an iPad makes me want to barf.



    of the three 'docs' I asked, all of them plan to buy one; including myself, 4 of 4. I'm hard pressed to believe that this won't be the fastest apple product to reach the five million mark. If you're a med student, then you've probably tried lifting radiology or pathology texts, any of which weighs 5 to 10 pounds; that alone will make this a killer device



    Off to the vomitorium, Roscoe
  • Reply 32 of 184
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    skipit
  • Reply 33 of 184
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one.



    This week, Epocrates Inc., the developer of mobile applications used by more than 900,000 healthcare professionals worldwide, revealed a new study of more than 350 clinicians conducted in the wake of Apple's iPad announcement. Among those surveyed, 9 percent said they plan to buy an iPad when it is immediately available, and another 13 percent intend to purchase one in the first year.



    In addition, another 38 percent of respondents said they are interested in the iPad, but would like to obtain more information about the product before they decide whether or not they will purchase.



    With a belief the iPad will gain traction in the health care community, Epocrates also announced this week that it intends to customize its clinical reference application, which is already available for the iPhone and iPod touch, for the iPad.



    "By optimizing our software for the iPad, we are capitalizing on the larger screen real estate and interactivity provided by this sophisticated device," said Rose Crane, chief executive officer of Epocrates. "We are committed to providing the most productive experience at the point of care, keeping physicians informed and focused on the patient rather than searching for answers."



    'We are continuing to explore the advanced capabilities of the iPad and ways it can help Epocrates address the evolving healthcare technology needs."



    Epocrates said that its medical program is currently in use by more than one in five physicians. The software has more than 275,000 physician subscribers using its software, available for iPhone, BlackBerry and Palm. More than 900,000 clinicians worldwide use Epocrates.



    The company's software was featured by Apple at its iPhone Software Roadmap event in 2008. The Epocrates medical reference application was the first available on the App Store.







    The study follows news earlier this week that some hospitals are looking at potential applications for the iPad. One San Francisco program, dubbed "Destination Bedside," aims to use tablets to provide X-rays, charts, prescriptions and notes to hospital workers at the touch of a finger.



    The success of Apple's iPad in the medical field will likely depend on the creation of third-party applications for the device like Epocrates. In addition to a number of bundled applications, the iPad will have access to Apple's App Store, which now offers more than 140,000 different options.



    The iPad has a starting price of $499 and is scheduled to ship by the end of March. The 3G-enabled version, which carries a $130 premium, should arrive a month later.



    As a physician, I will not be able to use the IPad to access my EMR because the IPad doesn't support Windows.
  • Reply 34 of 184
    Hardly surprising - doctors in Australia were one of the last professions to computers (instead of patient cards.)
  • Reply 35 of 184
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jsmjds View Post


    As a physician, I will not be able to use the IPad to access my EMR because the IPad doesn't support Windows.



    1) Welcome to the forum. Note that you don't have to quote the entire article.



    2) There are EMR apps for the iPhone.



    3) What do you mean it doesn't support Windows? There is evidence to suggest mounting it as a disk.
  • Reply 36 of 184
    This thing would be a dream to view medical data and images on! *__*



  • Reply 37 of 184
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post


    ...



    There are maybe 800,000 doctors in the US. And you want me to believe a study that sampled 350 of them? And it's not even the SLIGHTEST bit random either. There's probably a strong bias to contact people who already OWN an iPhone and USE epocrates. And the only worthwhile version of Epocrates costs $150/year to use!



    I think you can easily see the confounding variables here. I have no doubt that doctors are certainly excited to see what the iPad could do for medicine (I'm a medical student, so I'd know), but to put out such silly numbers mocks the intelligence of anyone who can read.



    To put this into perspective, the #1 use of tablet PCs is for medical use (signatures and such). But to even make the claim that 20% of US doctors want an iPad makes me want to barf.



    There are currently already nearly 3 Million Nurses.



    There are probably ten times that in support personnel.



    They all use Laptops in each room they are monitoring a patient. Each room has a portable station with XP updating records constantly.



    Instead of each room having a laptop the Nurse will run around and push changes to the Relational Database System hospital wide thus covering their dozens of patients with reduced costs to the Hospitals.
  • Reply 38 of 184
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,989member
    I thought Windows had WiFi support?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jsmjds View Post


    As a physician, I will not be able to use the IPad to access my EMR because the IPad doesn't support Windows.



  • Reply 39 of 184
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    More than 60 percent of physicians who participated in a new survey have shown interest in Apple's recently announced iPad, and one in five already intend to purchase one.



    The other four chew trident.
  • Reply 40 of 184
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jlanganki View Post


    Where did you find a doctor that only charges $150 per visit?



    In Sweden, it costs $30 per visit and all schools are free, thanks to the slightly higher tax.



    Anyhow, of 900.000 users, 350 were selected - and of them less than 50% are interested in an iPad.



    They should do a new research.
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