Apple rejected iPad app for using pinch to expand gesture

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  • Reply 21 of 214
    zoolookzoolook Posts: 657member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Apple rejected iPad app for using pinch to expand gesture



    So?



    Perhaps the developer should have read the SDK.



    Perhaps you should read the article.



    Seriously, they didn't use closed APIs, they coded the gesture recognition themselves.



    I think it's a harsh decision and also agree with a previous poster that Apple should be encouraging consistent gestures in software.



    In some ways though this doesn't make sense, because several games use multi-touch. I think it may have more to do with Picassa being a google gateway, and the ongoing lawsuits around multi-touch. That may complicate things.
  • Reply 22 of 214
    spotonspoton Posts: 645member
    Quote:

    Apple rejected iPad app for using pinch to expand gesture





    Apple likely is trying to patent the idea or it's already patented and they are licensing it for use only with their products and software, not third party.
  • Reply 23 of 214
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    Gestures for apple apps only? WTF apple, your whole platform is famous for the ability to use intuitive gestures. It's not like these developers are making their own OS. They helping you and your ecosystem to be more consistent and easy to use, or to put it more boldly, they are allowing you to move more hardware. Cracking down on developers for making apps better is not the right idea.
  • Reply 24 of 214
    iBooks may not be using hidden Apis for brightness control since kindle app for the ipad also has it I beleive.
  • Reply 25 of 214
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post


    yeah, what's shocking is that the developer was "shocked" by the rejection.



    The SDK terms of use do not have anything in there about "pinch to zoom" being only for Apple applications.



    Likely Apple rejected it under the 7th prong, which basically states "We can reject your application for any reason we see fit". The other 6 prongs do not apply here, as the developer didn't do anything like use an undocumented API.



    This is just another example of Apple being Apple?approving applications at whim, based on arbitrary rules.
  • Reply 26 of 214
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Josh.B. View Post


    The point is that the rules are changed mid-game in ways that are both arbitrary and unpredictable. This causes developers to waste huge amounts of time/money developing apps that fit the rules, but are nevertheless rejected.



    Apple has lost several notable developer partners doing just that. It is not a simple "my way or the highway" situation. It is "my future way, which you cannot know" or the highway.



    I am interested by this comment - which notable developer partners do you speak of ?
  • Reply 27 of 214
    You guys really need to calm down. Developers aren't allowed to use the private APIs because they aren't READY yet. Watch this 60 second video on Bertrand Serlet on using Apple's private API's: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jd97us27eSg



    He explains everything.
  • Reply 28 of 214
    ltmpltmp Posts: 204member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post


    Apple likely is trying to patent the idea or it's already patented and they are licensing it for use only with their products and software, not third party.



    I was just about to say the same thing. If Apple is paying a license fee for the use of a gesture, that license might not extend to third party apps.
  • Reply 29 of 214
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stedwick View Post


    You guys really need to calm down. Developers aren't allowed to use the private APIs because they aren't READY yet. Watch this 60 second video on Bertrand Serlet on using Apple's private API's: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jd97us27eSg



    He explains everything.



    Whilst I agree re the access to the brightness controls surely this does not apply to the case where they coded their own routine to mimic a user interface look & feel ?
  • Reply 30 of 214
    smiles77smiles77 Posts: 668member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post


    Apple likely is trying to patent the idea or it's already patented and they are licensing it for use only with their products and software, not third party.



    This is the reason for rejection, I believe. I don't think it has to do with APIs, I think it has to do with Apple's multitouch patents.
  • Reply 31 of 214
    moosomooso Posts: 25member
    If the developers had to write code to recreate the ability to do something (because they weren't allowed access to existing code), then shouldn't they have had a clue that it might be a problem.



    I mean whether not allowing them to use the gesture is right or wrong on Apple's part, they still must have realized Apple didn't want them duplicating the function - otherwise Apple would have given developers access to it.
  • Reply 32 of 214
    19841984 Posts: 955member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mooso View Post


    If the developers had to write code to recreate the ability to do something (because they weren't allowed access to existing code), then shouldn't they have had a clue that it might be a problem.



    I mean whether not allowing them to use the gesture is right or wrong on Apple's part, they still must have realized Apple didn't want them duplicating the function - otherwise Apple would have given developers access to it.



    Finally the voice of reason!
  • Reply 33 of 214
    damn_its_hotdamn_its_hot Posts: 1,207member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sheff View Post


    ...WTF apple, your whole platform is famous for the ability to use intuitive gestures. It's not like these developers are making their own...





    It is no different than me deciding that I want to use cmd-Z for quit (instead of undo) or cmd-X to quit (instead of cut). The idea is to use a standard set of gestures for the same thing allowing a consistent user interface. If users are expected to use multi-touch successfully then there has to be a standard foundation not an ever changing foundation.



    Consistency is why they had to detect and handle the gesture on their own - it is not meant to be overridden.



    Take a look a Apple's HI Guidelines if you don't believe me. This is a big part of what made Apple's OS so successful on the Lisa, Mac, iPhone, Newton (oops, well no one is perfect). It is what they refer to as look and feel. This is why Windows apps (especially in the past) did not work - its like being in a pawn shop or flea market EVERYTHING is different just for the sake of being different.
  • Reply 34 of 214
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post


    This is a rare case where I actually side with the developer. Apple should *encourage* the use of consistent gestures to perform similar tasks throughout all apps running on the iDevices.



    Look at it from the other side. those special gestures are what give Apple apps a potential edge. So of course they aren't going to let them go out.



    Also, the API rule is known to all so why anyone would even try it is beyond me.



    and frankly I don't see that this Picasa program is really inferior because you can only tap. It's a common and comfortable gesture for many
  • Reply 35 of 214
    josh.b.josh.b. Posts: 353member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by markm49uk View Post


    I am interested by this comment - which notable developer partners do you speak of ?



    I had in mind the fiasco which was precipitated by the rejection of Google Voice apps. My recollection is that several prominent developers jumped ship. I'll take a quick look and see what I come up with for background info...here's a couple:



    "Rogue Amoeba no longer has any plans for additional iPhone applications, and updates to our existing iPhone applications will likely be rare," said Kafasis. "The iPhone platform had great promise, but that promise is not enough,"



    http://www.pcworld.com/article/16922..._look_bad.html



    ?"My decision to stop iPhone development has had everything to do with Apple?s policies.? ? Joe Hewitt"



    http://techcrunch.com/2009/11/11/joe...s-the-project/
  • Reply 36 of 214
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmotl View Post


    Is this only the case for iPad apps? The Facebook iPhone app uses pinch to zoom for photos.



    they aren't talking about zooming a single item but the zoom flick gesture that has been highlighted on the ipad for opening and spreading out photos in an album
  • Reply 37 of 214
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post


    Perhaps you should read the article.



    Seriously, they didn't use closed APIs, they coded the gesture recognition themselves.



    I think it's a harsh decision and also agree with a previous poster that Apple should be encouraging consistent gestures in software.



    In some ways though this doesn't make sense, because several games use multi-touch. I think it may have more to do with Picassa being a google gateway, and the ongoing lawsuits around multi-touch. That may complicate things.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by skittlebrau79 View Post


    The SDK terms of use do not have anything in there about "pinch to zoom" being only for Apple applications.



    Likely Apple rejected it under the 7th prong, which basically states "We can reject your application for any reason we see fit". The other 6 prongs do not apply here, as the developer didn't do anything like use an undocumented API.



    This is just another example of Apple being Apple?approving applications at whim, based on arbitrary rules.



    There is no mystery here. iPhone/iPad apps are not bring your own. You either develop with the built in APIs, or you don't develop. Given that the gesture was not part of the gesture library, it goes without saying that developing your own gesture is not an option. It also does not coincide with the Apple mandates that all apps conform to iPad standards, and not create their own types of gestures and interactions. Including the mimicing of built in features that are not part of the SDK.



    Reading the SDK would prevent 99% of App Store rejections.
  • Reply 38 of 214
    minderbinderminderbinder Posts: 1,703member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Perhaps the developer should have read the SDK.



    Does the SDK actually say that doing what they did is forbidden?
  • Reply 39 of 214
    damn_its_hotdamn_its_hot Posts: 1,207member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post


    Apple likely is trying to patent the idea or it's already patented and they are licensing it for use only with their products and software, not third party.



    Apple purchased the entire multi-touch thing (Fingerworks), IP, patents and all and the fellow that did the original work is now an employee (last I heard).



    They have some work to do with Elan Microelectronics but Apple's legal guys think it is theirs.
  • Reply 40 of 214
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,757member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mooso View Post


    If the developers had to write code to recreate the ability to do something (because they weren't allowed access to existing code), then shouldn't they have had a clue that it might be a problem.



    I mean whether not allowing them to use the gesture is right or wrong on Apple's part, they still must have realized Apple didn't want them duplicating the function - otherwise Apple would have given developers access to it.



    Not really. The API's not being available could simply be because Apple's APIs are not yet ready for release. Nothing about that says it is then verboten to implement custom code to do the same thing.
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