Apple asks for iPhone prototype back, Gizmodo could face UTSA lawsuit

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Comments

  • Reply 141 of 364
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 1,839member
    Can you imagine how grateful Apple would've been to Gizmodo had they kept their mouth shut and handed the device over to Apple. Now Gizmodo will be on Apple's Scheisse-Liste and will never receive early info or articles from Apple.
  • Reply 142 of 364
    williamgwilliamg Posts: 322member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by echosonic View Post






    3. Finding a device that you know for certain is at best "lost" and then selling it to somebody you know for certain is not the owner is a crime.






    What crime is that? If you find an iPod on the sidewalk, what else can you NOT do with it?
  • Reply 143 of 364
    williamgwilliamg Posts: 322member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by canucklehead View Post




    Gizmodo knew exactly what they were doing by publishing these photos, as well as the impact on another company's business.



    What is the impact on Apple's business?
  • Reply 144 of 364
    I was wondering when Apple would act on this obvious theft. Just because someone left something behind does not give someone else the right to take it. That is theft. Screw the legal crap- use common sense.
  • Reply 145 of 364
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,748member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    No, if you find something of value in any establishment you turn it in to the propriatars. Taking it with you is called stealing. Are people o. This list really that morally ignorant?



    Stop making up your own laws and trying to pass them off as fact. Can you list any property law that states one must turn found property over to the proprietor? Most laws I have perused in my ignorance, do not state this. No where. They do say the finder may take charge of the item, i.e. hold it, and they must make reasonable efforts to contact the owner and return it without request for payment. But nothing about handing it over to a bar owner.



    I'd really like your input on this. Perhaps, as you state, you could find a 5 year old to back it up.
  • Reply 146 of 364
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WilliamG View Post


    What law did the guy break? The reports said that he tried to find the owner at the bar.



    What law did the guy break?



    Duh! He sold something that was not his. If he was honest he would have turned it in to the local police.
  • Reply 147 of 364
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,748member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pregador27 View Post


    I was wondering when Apple would act on this obvious theft. Just because someone left something behind does not give someone else the right to take it. That is theft. Screw the legal crap- use common sense.



    bullshit. You just stole my time with this post. Is that a indictable offense? No, that would be me making up my own fabricated charges. oh well, I guess we all do that.
  • Reply 148 of 364
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WilliamG View Post


    Was the phone obtained through theft, embezzlement, larceny, or extortion?



    No? It was found?



    Yes it was theft. Look it up in a dictionary.
  • Reply 149 of 364
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WilliamG View Post


    What crime is that? If you find an iPod on the sidewalk, what else can you NOT do with it?



    But it wasn't found on the street , was it? It was found where the owner was obviously going to return to claim it.
  • Reply 150 of 364
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lales View Post


    Was the Find My Phone feature simply not working that day? Or the next? In other words Remote Wipe worked, but FMP didn't?



    Probably too late for anyone who read this to read the response, but find my iphone does not work once you wipe the phone. They must have made the judgement call to wipe the sensitive data instead of trying to recover the phone before sensitive data was discovered.
  • Reply 151 of 364
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,748member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    No, if you find something of value in any establishment you turn it in to the propriatars. Taking it with you is called stealing. Are people on this list really that morally ignorant?



    No, taking it and making no reasonable efforts to return it to the owner is called stealing. It is morally ignorant, perhaps, to accuse someone of a crime the didn't commit.
  • Reply 152 of 364
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post


    bullshit. You just stole my time with this post. Is that a indictable offense? No, that would be me making up my own fabricated charges. oh well, I guess we all do that.



    How freakin' stupid can you be to not recognize stealing? If it is not yours and you take it, it is STEALING.
  • Reply 153 of 364
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,748member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pregador27 View Post


    Yes it was theft. Look it up in a dictionary.



    No, it wasn't theft. Look it up in the statutes.
  • Reply 154 of 364
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post


    Stop making up your own laws and trying to pass them off as fact. Can you list any property law that states one must turn found property over to the proprietor? Most laws I have perused in my ignorance, do not state this. No where. They do say the finder may take charge of the item, i.e. hold it, and they must make reasonable efforts to contact the owner and return it without request for payment. But nothing about handing it over to a bar owner.



    I'd really like your input on this. Perhaps, as you state, you could find a 5 year old to back it up.



    You would have fit in well at Enron. The term a 5 year old could define is 'wrong'.
  • Reply 155 of 364
    earthyearthy Posts: 16member
    Just thinking back to the Thinksecret incident a year or two ago, that was nothing compared to this. This is an aggravated case of ethical misconduct. It is not in the public interest to reveal Apple's trade secrets to the public, unlike leaks of information that some individual or group in government, for example, are keeping hidden from the sovereign people and which might affect the conduct of public policy. This was a clear violation of private property and private interest, Gizmodo would have no case in court and I would not be sorry to see them closed down like Thinksecret was. I won't be visiting their site again, that's for sure.
  • Reply 156 of 364
    magic_almagic_al Posts: 325member
    Wait a minute. None of the players in the this story have spoken of or taken any action toward a lawsuit. A lawsuit is not part of the story. AppleInsider bringing it up as a possibility is not reporting but speculation, bordering on advocacy, that Apple could or should sue. Meanwhile, AI and all other media have benefited hugely from page views due to this story. Loving the story while wanting to shoot the messenger?



    How can Gizmodo be blamed when everybody is running the story? If the phone didn't end up with Gizmodo it would have ended up on the Internet somehow. An Apple employee made a mistake, and Apple apparently lacked the foresight to have a contingency plan for "civilians" to return lost prototypes quietly, and so everything that followed was inevitable. Deliberately or not, it's Apple that caused this to happen.
  • Reply 157 of 364
    williamgwilliamg Posts: 322member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OC4Theo View Post


    If you find something that doesn't belong to you, it is your duty to return it to the rightful owner.



    S'Funny - I find cars parked along the street every day. They don't belong to me.



    But I have no duty.



    I find newspapers on the subway every day. But I have no duty.



    Once I saw a wallet on the floor. I had no duty to return it to the rightful owner, so I left it there.



    Get it?
  • Reply 158 of 364
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,748member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GQB View Post


    You would have fit in well at Enron. The term a 5 year old could define is 'wrong'.



    Nice ad hom. And that 5 year old might even have been able to define 'wrong' correctly. You should find one to ask.



    Actually, a good fit at enron would be someone that simply makes up their own laws, no?
  • Reply 159 of 364
    chronsterchronster Posts: 1,894member
    holy shit! And here I was absolutely convinced it was a fake!



    this is funny stuff
  • Reply 160 of 364
    I don't follow Gizmodo much, but reading all these posts, I am wondering why all the hating on them? I thought they just write articles about tech news. What's all the vitriol about?

    Just wondered.
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