Former Apple Retail mastermind jumps ship from Microsoft to Tesla

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  • Reply 21 of 56
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,613member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post


    that's probably because MS has nothing in their arsenal to sell in a retail environment. They are a software company, save for the XBox, Zune and the up-comming wP7. When i first heard MS was trying to do an Apple Retail Copycat, i just



    I also think it might fall flat because MS has no clear direction other than OS' dev's and MS Office. It's kind of hard to window shop or kick the tires on MS Office unless they hold street-side demo's like the old tonic salesmen from the 1800's.



    Sure you can kick the tires on the XBox, but then it turns into a mobscene of overweight little kids and fanboys/girls trying to play MOH like it's a free archade. (ie Best Buy)



    If MS is going to compete in any real way now, they need to keep their focus. Not pet projects (table PC, phones, etc...)



    I'm on the same wavelength as you. When Microsoft announced the store, my first question was what will they sell that is compelling and unique enough to lure customers to the store? Apple's non-iPod offerings were treated like redheaded stepchildren in every major retailer that they tried to sell through so they really needed to develop their own retail channel. Microsoft's products are already front and center in the computer and gaming sections of Best Buy, Walmart, etc. Plus, every mall has a Gamestop or whatever that chain's name is now.



    And then, to make things worse they wanted the stores to be as upmarket as the Apple Store. It's like selling Kias in a showroom built to Mercedes Benz dealership specs.



    Just one more failed enterprise in the endless procession of failed Microsoft emterprises of which the latest, but certainly not the last, is Kin.
  • Reply 22 of 56
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,118member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post




    Being a mild apple fan, and had the scratch, i'd buy a Tesla. But not at $50g. Plus i'd have to drag an extension cord from my crappy appartment building out to the street to charge it



    Until the charging infrastructure develops, I would stick with a plug-in hybrid.



    The Chevy Volt actually looks potentially promising.
  • Reply 23 of 56
    paulmjohnsonpaulmjohnson Posts: 1,380member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by paxman View Post


    Me too. I also imagine Tesla to be a far more interesting proposition than MS. Apple and Tesla are both forward looking innovative companies wanting to stir things up whereas MS just wanted to copy.



    I kind of wonder if this is actually a demonstration of the article yesterday explaining that projects Steve gets involved in are done as if Apple are a startup again. I bet this chap found M$ the bureaucratic nightmare that most big companies are when trying to get something new going. I'm sure if Steve was backing the Apple store idea, getting the money to setup the high cost stores Apple have done was relatively easy, but in M$ it was probably too hard (hence only 3 stores have opened).



    I wish him well at Tesla, and obviously they are far more likely to have a startup mentality. I'd like to see them do well as a company, since electric cars would be a benefit to all, whether you believe in climate change or not, energy independence would be a real boon.



    Unfortunately I can't see it working yet. For electric only cars to really work we need a serious (and probably government backed) commitment to implementing a charging infrastructure. A start would be to require all new houses to have three phases brought in, so you could have a 415v charging point in the garage. Trying to charge an electric car off 110v, or even 220v if you have a couple of phases, is going to take too long.
  • Reply 24 of 56
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Until the charging infrastructure develops, I would stick with a plug-in hybrid.



    The Chevy Volt actually looks potentially promising.



    The newer all-battery cars are promising ranges of 200 miles or better. That's plenty, even for most commuting. An expanded charging infrastructure isn't going to help very much for longer trips, since it takes hours to recharge the batteries.
  • Reply 25 of 56
    paulmjohnsonpaulmjohnson Posts: 1,380member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    The newer all-battery cars are promising ranges of 200 miles or better. That's plenty, even for most commuting. An expanded charging infrastructure isn't going to help very much for longer trips, since it takes hours to recharge the batteries.



    True, but I do think there needs to be some sort of "away from home" charging infrastructure. When I take weekend breaks, it's rare that I go more than 200 miles from home, but it's also rare that I go less than 100 miles from home, hence for the round trip, I would need there to be some place to charge when I get to where I'm going.



    I wonder if the electric vehicle market will get big enough to justify someone like the Hilton chain to put charging points in as a selling point?
  • Reply 26 of 56
    justflybobjustflybob Posts: 1,337member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dlux View Post


    Unless you're a clueless gurl* messing with your electrical system, in which case it's "*FTTT!!* WAAAK! SPARKY!!"





    *playing on stereotypes, although in this case it's warranted in the (humorously) self-deprecating story thus linked.



    That gal's site is hilarious. Thanks for the laugh.
  • Reply 27 of 56
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post


    True, but I do think there needs to be some sort of "away from home" charging infrastructure. When I take weekend breaks, it's rare that I go more than 200 miles from home, but it's also rare that I go less than 100 miles from home, hence for the round trip, I would need there to be some place to charge when I get to where I'm going.



    I wonder if the electric vehicle market will get big enough to justify someone like the Hilton chain to put charging points in as a selling point?



    Maybe, some day. Costco put in charging stations pretty quickly when the first electric cars (EV1) were on the road, though I'm not sure why, because there weren't many of them. I don't think any of the newer electric cars require any special charging apparatus so it should be relatively easy for retailers, hotels, etc. to make provisions.
  • Reply 28 of 56
    formerarsgmformerarsgm Posts: 191member
    Interesting. George is a super guy, and I enjoyed working with him during the early days of Apple Retail, but he's really more of a mall-based retail specialist. Seems like a new challenge for a very talented guy. Good luck, George.
  • Reply 29 of 56
    r00fusr00fus Posts: 245member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Until the charging infrastructure develops, I would stick with a plug-in hybrid.



    The Chevy Volt actually looks potentially promising.



    Since I have a family (wife, kid, parents), our needs are a bit all over the place. We would kill for either a hybrid minivan (toyota! where is my Sienna hybrid?!) or a full-electric replacement for one of our existing Priuses (perhaps Leaf?).



    If the Tesla S Sedan has adequate range, there should be no real reason to shun it... how often, honestly, have you done a road trip ... and if you have, don't you, your family, your friends you're tripping with, have another car that accepts gas?



    It's a bit analogous to having a (powerpc) mac a few years ago... I still needed a PC for games and work (provided in my case) or running the one or two critical legacy apps, but the Mac was oh-so-much nicer to both play with and create DVDs, host photos and edit music.



    Lot of folks could use a Mac-like 2nd car, and the Leaf and Tesla S look like they're selling to that market.
  • Reply 30 of 56
    haggarhaggar Posts: 1,568member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post


    that's probably because MS has nothing in their arsenal to sell in a retail environment. They are a software company, save for the XBox, Zune and the up-comming wP7. When i first heard MS was trying to do an Apple Retail Copycat, i just



    Is it really copying when Microsoft hires the same person who originally worked on the Apple store? Can you accuse someone of copying his own work?



    And instead of praising Blankenship, why aren't AI readers flaming this guy for taking a job at Microsoft? Didn't he betray Apple users everywhere by going to work for Microsoft?
  • Reply 31 of 56
    djmikeodjmikeo Posts: 178member
    I bet Blankenship has a great collection of bright colored t-shirts.
  • Reply 32 of 56
    This is great. Tesla is a great company. Their the kind of company that would put a fire under the heals of the rest of the dreadful and arcane auto manufacturers out there. I mean hybrids, really? lame. Wish Tesla and Blankenship the best of luck. I'd stand behind anything a company like that did.



    PS just to be picky, am I the only one that hates it when people use the word "upstart" to describe a startup. I thought upstart referred to kind of a parvenu. I guess it sort of applies to Tesla Motors.
  • Reply 33 of 56
    djmikeodjmikeo Posts: 178member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post


    This is great. Tesla is a great company. Their the kind of company that would put a fire under the heals of the rest of the dreadful and arcane auto manufacturers out there. I mean hybrids, really? lame. Wish Tesla and Blankenship the best of luck. I'd stand behind anything a company like that did.



    PS just to be picky, am I the only one that hates it when people use the word "upstart" to describe a startup. I thought upstart referred to kind of a parvenu. I guess it sort of applies to Tesla Motors.



    Since you are being picky.... You probably meant "They're the kind of company..." instead of "Their the kind of company..." And maybe a fire under the "heels" instead of "heals." Only since you are being picky.
  • Reply 34 of 56
    quinneyquinney Posts: 2,525member
    Everyone please note that the Tesla can be charged from any electrical outlet.



    See http://www.teslamotors.com/goelectric at the bottom of the page.
  • Reply 35 of 56
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post


    PS just to be picky, am I the only one that hates it when people use the word "upstart" to describe a startup. I thought upstart referred to kind of a parvenu. I guess it sort of applies to Tesla Motors.



    Upstart works, though it probably got used because it sounds like startup, which puts it on the verge of trite. Not that I'd necessarily call Tesla a startup at this point. At least the way I've seen it used, parvenu usually refers to someone with more money than taste.
  • Reply 36 of 56
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    Everyone please note that the Tesla can be charged from any electrical outlet.



    See http://www.teslamotors.com/goelectric at the bottom of the page.



    Please note that I already said as much.
  • Reply 37 of 56
    I think it's a very interesting development if Tesla Motors is looking at Apple as it's role model for building itself on.



    There really isn't an apple equivalent within the automotive industry, and there isn't an industry which needed one more. Tesla could be it.
  • Reply 38 of 56
    quinneyquinney Posts: 2,525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Please note that I already said as much.



    Do you mean this?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Maybe, some day. Costco put in charging stations pretty quickly when the first electric cars (EV1) were on the road, though I'm not sure why, because there weren't many of them. I don't think any of the newer electric cars require any special charging apparatus so it should be relatively easy for retailers, hotels, etc. to make provisions.



    You made it sound like there will need to be charging stations and provisions made.

    The link I posted, which was not the vague speculation of your post, shows that is not the case.
  • Reply 39 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post


    Agreed, that is the real news here. I don't know squat about the benefits or pitfalls of franchise ownership vs. company owned dealers...my guess is that by allowing franchising, the company puts all it's financial concerns (start-up costs and anual up-keep costs) of dealer ownership in the hands of some salesman/owner that thinks he/she knows how to sell cars. Then the dealer calls the shots as far as how much to sell them for and competition. Like Best Buy Apple "Geniuses" vs. Apple Store "Geniuses". Or better yet, like the beer guys at ball-games. They put money up-front for the merch. (at a discount/ or cost) and then adjusts the prices to meet their business models.



    Whatever the case may be, if Tesla wants to run the dealerships themselves, more power to them. Perhaps then there will be more control over how the cars sell. Let's face it, unless Tesla starts making low-cost electric cars to compete with the Toyota Prius, Honda Insight or the likes, Teslas are NICHE market cars and probably wouldn't benefit from franchising. People who buy a Tesla will probably pay sticker price for it without a blink.



    Being a mild apple fan, and had the scratch, i'd buy a Tesla. But not at $50g. Plus i'd have to drag an extension cord from my crappy appartment building out to the street to charge it





    Some more news in this article at business wire: http://www.businesswire.com/portal/s...32&newsLang=en



    Quote:

    Tesla is revolutionizing the auto purchasing experience. Unlike traditional car dealerships, Tesla stores are designed to be stylish and inviting. Blankenship will build a long-term retail development plan to give customers the opportunity to purchase cars and learn about Tesla technology. Blankenship’s initial projects will include opening Tesla stores in Tokyo, Japan, Toronto, Canada, and Washington, DC.





    Sounds like they are taking a more retail approach than a dealership one. Actually, considering they only have two models to sell, they really don't need giant "lots" like the traditional dealership.
  • Reply 40 of 56
    dr millmossdr millmoss Posts: 5,403member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinney View Post


    You made it sound like there will need to be charging stations and provisions made.

    The link I posted, which was not the vague speculation of your post, shows that is not the case.



    No, that's not what I said at all. Never mind.
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