iOS 4 purportedly references CDMA iPhone 4, next-gen iPad

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  • Reply 41 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post


    If it is true that there will be a CDMA iPhone, although frankly I don't care either way (UK) that would only really make sense if it was LTE: why release a CDMA iPhone only to release an LTE model a few months later (albiet at the earliest)?



    You don't know Apple very well, do you?
  • Reply 42 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    So what happens when you are in an area that doesn't get Verizon's LTE reception? Are you just going to go from LTE to no signal? It has to fall back on something, just like UTMS drops to EDGE or GPRS. There will be a CDMA phone in some way. Also, if you are on EDGE, you can't use simultaneous data and voice either. That right there tells me iOS can support that.



    FYI: Telus and Bell Mobility (CDMA) here in Canada added 3G GSM to their towers to support the iPhone and other GSM smartphones and there is no way for the iPhone/other GSM phones to fall back to Edge or CDMA. If you move out of the limited 3G area, you're toast.



    Both are headed to LTE down the road, but no one knows when.



    So, the same could be done by Verizon. If an LTE phone is made by Apple, it could have the same restriction as Telus and Bell. You move out of the LTE area, you're toast.



    Thank goodness we on these forums aren't making the decisions. APPLE would be toast! he he
  • Reply 43 of 53
    joe hsjoe hs Posts: 488member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amerist View Post


    You don't know Apple very well, do you?



    If a customer bought a CDMA [only] verizon iPhone in January, and a LTE model was released later that year unless they had anything less than a 6 month contract they would have to wait to get a new phone (without paying extra) at least a year, maybe 2 depending on verizons plans.
  • Reply 44 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post


    If it is true that there will be a CDMA iPhone, although frankly I don't care either way (UK) that would only really make sense if it was LTE: why release a CDMA iPhone only to release an LTE model a few months later (albiet at the earliest)?



    and...



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post


    If a customer bought a CDMA [only] verizon iPhone in January, and a LTE model was released later that year unless they had anything less than a 6 month contract they would have to wait to get a new phone (without paying extra) at least a year, maybe 2 depending on verizons plans.



    Lets say it is true that the iPhone for Verizon (or Sprint, or both for that matter) comes out in January, all right? Thats what the latest rumor says at least. Then, if next year a "LTE" iPhone comes out -- it would be not on Verizon, but on ATT. Then Jan. 2012 the 4G Verizon/Sprint phone would be released. Now sure, thats only a year after -- so people couldn't upgrade -- but then why should Apple release a phone every year, if they follow that pattern? The truth of the matter is this -- whenever you buy technology, sometime it will be turned from the latest technology to the old tech. Case in point, I bought my 32bit Intel Apple May 2006 -- July/Aug 2006 it became "old" tech because Apple released the Intel Core Duo 2 processors -- which were 64bit. It was not only newer, faster, but had more ram and was cheaper then my older machine. Why would Apple in Jan release a 32-bit Intel processor when they knew 6 months down the road it was going to be replaced?



    Because thats just how it works, and I couldn't help it. No one can. If you REALLY want a LTE iPhone, just wait for one. Otherwise buy the iPhone when it comes available for your carrier.
  • Reply 45 of 53
    bappobappo Posts: 24member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rhyde View Post


    It's pretty obvious the "listing" I looked at is a disassembly of the code. It's ARM machine code. The real code is written in C (of some sort), no doubt.

    Cheers



    Do you know any disassembler that can generate the original C comments from the

    binary ?



    Bappo
  • Reply 46 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macintosh_Next View Post


    and...







    Lets say it is true that the iPhone for Verizon (or Sprint, or both for that matter) comes out in January, all right? Thats what the latest rumor says at least. Then, if next year a "LTE" iPhone comes out -- it would be not on Verizon, but on ATT. Then Jan. 2012 the 4G Verizon/Sprint phone would be released. Now sure, thats only a year after -- so people couldn't upgrade -- but then why should Apple release a phone every year, if they follow that pattern? The truth of the matter is this -- whenever you buy technology, sometime it will be turned from the latest technology to the old tech. Case in point, I bought my 32bit Intel Apple May 2006 -- July/Aug 2006 it became "old" tech because Apple released the Intel Core Duo 2 processors -- which were 64bit. It was not only newer, faster, but had more ram and was cheaper then my older machine. Why would Apple in Jan release a 32-bit Intel processor when they knew 6 months down the road it was going to be replaced?



    Because thats just how it works, and I couldn't help it. No one can. If you REALLY want a LTE iPhone, just wait for one. Otherwise buy the iPhone when it comes available for your carrier.



    Note that LTE (long-term evolution [toward 4G]) is not 4G but 3.9G. LTE Advanced, which is true 4G, is still a decade away. There is not a tremendous difference in speed between LTE (3.9G) and 3G and there is very little difference in speed between LTE (3.9G) and the latest HSPA+ 3G+ of AT&T.



    So, here is my prediction:



    2011: iPhone 5 with 3G+ HSPA+, AT&T exclusive

    2012: iPhone 6 with 3.9G LTE, AT&T and Verizon

    CDMA2000 iPhone: has never happened, will never happen
  • Reply 47 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gokhan View Post


    Note that LTE (long-term evolution [toward 4G]) is not 4G but 3.9G. LTE Advanced, which is true 4G, is still a decade away. There is not a tremendous difference in speed between LTE (3.9G) and 3G and there is very little difference in speed between LTE (3.9G) and the latest HSPA+ 3G+ of AT&T.



    So, here is my prediction:



    2011: iPhone 5 with 3G+ HSPA+, AT&T exclusive

    2012: iPhone 6 with 3.9G LTE, AT&T and Verizon

    CDMA2000 iPhone: has never happened, will never happen



    Ah, I see! That kinda funny, because the sales rep at Verizon likes to tell people that Sprints WiMAX is not a true "4G" (which, btw, its kinda true) but that LTE is, he never said anything about LTE Advanced. Anyway, even with that info, it doesn't really change that IF Apple does a Sprint/Verizon iPhone, it doesn't have to be released at the same time as ATT. It can be, but doesn't have to be. And ATT could always have the "new" one, say in 2011 CDMA's iPhone is like iPhone 4.5, and then ATT gets iPhone 5, so on and so forth. It just depends on when the iPhone for Verizon/Sprint comes out.
  • Reply 48 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macintosh_Next View Post


    Ah, I see! That kinda funny, because the sales rep at Verizon likes to tell people that Sprints WiMAX is not a true "4G" (which, btw, its kinda true) but that LTE is, he never said anything about LTE Advanced. Anyway, even with that info, it doesn't really change that IF Apple does a Sprint/Verizon iPhone, it doesn't have to be released at the same time as ATT. It can be, but doesn't have to be. And ATT could always have the "new" one, say in 2011 CDMA's iPhone is like iPhone 4.5, and then ATT gets iPhone 5, so on and so forth. It just depends on when the iPhone for Verizon/Sprint comes out.



    Yes, indeed, currently 4G is only a marketing claim but not an official, certified specification. The official definition of real 4G is at least 100 Mb/s download speed for mobile applications. This will only be possible in about a decade after the introduction of LTE Advanced and WiMAX 802.16m.



    Currently, AT&T's new generation of mobile technology, which is HSPA+, to be available with iPhone 5 and new smartphones, is not that far from LTE. If LTE is 3.9G, HSPA+ would be like 3.75G. LTE is about 3 times short of real 4G. HSPA+ is about 18 times short of real 4G. Likewise, the current implementation of WiMAX is only between HSPA+ and LTE, about 7 times short of real 4G. LTE Advanced and WiMAX 802.16m will meet the 100 Mb/s download speed of real 4G in about a decade.



    But, of course, out there in the field in real life, the actual users would be lucky with even a few Mb/s, given the weak signals and overloaded networks.
  • Reply 49 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AIaddict View Post


    I dont see anything in the code to suggest the new iphones are CDMA. They could be 2011 iphone 5's with different LTE chipsets, or maybe there are testing new 3.5G options. Just because they are testing something does not mean 1) it is CDMA, 2) it is for Verizon, 3) it will be out soon, or for that matter, ever.



    Sorry Charlie....AT&T is gonna be upgrading/squeezing out their 3g/hspa in 2011. Not L.T.E. yet.



    The leaders of that at launch will be China Unicom, Vodaphone & you guessed it VERZION



    You'll be seeing this live this Nov with USB modems, netbooks, & already confirmed Google tablets.
  • Reply 50 of 53
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gokhan View Post


    Yes, indeed, currently 4G is only a marketing claim but not an official, certified specification. The official definition of real 4G is at least 100 Mb/s download speed for mobile applications. This will only be possible in about a decade after the introduction of LTE Advanced and WiMAX 802.16m.



    Where did you find this official certification specification stating 100Mbps downloads equals 4G and anything less is less than 4G? What governing body is this? Who recognizes them?
  • Reply 51 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Where did you find this official certification specification stating 100Mbps downloads equals 4G and anything less is less than 4G? What governing body is this? Who recognizes them?



    It's ITU and recognized worldwide, including the LTE and WiMAX standard developers, who submit their proposed standards to ITU for certification. (In fact LTE and WiMAX are the only remaining candidates for 4G.) 100 Mb/s for mobile applications is specified under ITU's IMT Advanced specifications, which is the technical name for 4G. A good article to start reading is:



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4G



    AT&T has made the right decision by making a gradual switch to LTE, by transitioning from HSPA+. HSPA+ is not that inferior to LTE and this way they ensure a healthy transition by waiting to choose the best available and debugged hardware for LTE. Verizon will have a lot of problems by being the first to hop in the LTE bandwagon. This may also delay Verizon's switch to true 4G, which is LTE Advanced, due to their acquisition of early, not fully developed hardware that may not be compatible with LTE Advanced, true 4G that is.



    The following newsletter explains the proposed transition from LTE to 4G (LTE Advanced) fairly well. In principle it could be as simple as a software update, but this will be dependent on how up-to-date the LTE hardware is. Because of this, again, AT&T has made the wise decision to wait for more up-to-date hardware. They will have a much smoother transition from LTE to true 4G (LTE Advanced) in comparison to Verizon, who will use early, not up-to-date hardware. See the newsletter for more details:



    http://www.nomor-research.com/root/d...09-12_v1-0.pdf
  • Reply 52 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gokhan View Post


    Yes, indeed, currently 4G is only a marketing claim but not an official, certified specification. The official definition of real 4G is at least 100 Mb/s download speed for mobile applications. This will only be possible in about a decade after the introduction of LTE Advanced and WiMAX 802.16m.



    Currently, AT&T's new generation of mobile technology, which is HSPA+, to be available with iPhone 5 and new smartphones, is not that far from LTE. If LTE is 3.9G, HSPA+ would be like 3.75G. LTE is about 3 times short of real 4G. HSPA+ is about 18 times short of real 4G. Likewise, the current implementation of WiMAX is only between HSPA+ and LTE, about 7 times short of real 4G. LTE Advanced and WiMAX 802.16m will meet the 100 Mb/s download speed of real 4G in about a decade.



    But, of course, out there in the field in real life, the actual users would be lucky with even a few Mb/s, given the weak signals and overloaded networks.



    But isn't WiMAX 2.0, or WiMAX 802.16m, coming out with hardware next year (source)?
  • Reply 53 of 53
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macintosh_Next View Post


    But isn't WiMAX 2.0, or WiMAX 802.16m, coming out with hardware next year (source)?



    I doubt 4G WiMAX (802.16m) will be available in 2011 but perhaps in 2012. The article is too optimistic.



    It's a shame that Sprint is marketing the current 3G+ WiMAX (802.16e) as 4G.



    WiMAX will very likely be limited only to frequencies near 2.5 GHz. These frequencies don't penetrate very deep or go very far. LTE seems to be a better technology and will dominate the market. WiMAX, if it survives, will primarily use the 2.5 GHz frequency range. Even Sprint is now adopting LTE for their lower-frequency bands.



    It will also be interesting to see when AT&T and Verizon will be able to switch to 4G LTE (LTE Advanced), as opposed to the current 3G+ implementation of LTE they are testing, and if AT&T will be able to beat Verizon again in implementing 4G LTE (LTE Advanced) first, as they beat them by implementing 3G+ before Verizon could do it -- the fastest wireless data network in the nation as justifiably advertised by AT&T.
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