Apple testing iOS 4.1 alongside next-gen iPod touch, iPad and 'unknown' product

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  • Reply 61 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eightzero View Post


    Have my visa card in hand.



    So what happens to your apple tv you just bought (theoretically) this year when this new iTV device rolls out? I'm betting it doesn't get the iTV OS upgrade, not even as a paid option, and at some point becomes completely out dated, and by out dated i mean it stops functioning correctly due to software not hardware failure.
  • Reply 62 of 66
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,563member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jeffreytgilbert View Post


    So what happens to your apple tv you just bought (theoretically) this year when this new iTV device rolls out? I'm betting it doesn't get the iTV OS upgrade, not even as a paid option, and at some point becomes completely out dated, and by out dated i mean it stops functioning correctly due to software not hardware failure.



    That eventually happens with any "computer" product you buy. Really, Jeffrey, at least try to be a smart troll. Well, maybe that is an oxymoron.
  • Reply 63 of 66
    aizmovaizmov Posts: 988member
    So 4.1 is coming to the iPad, right? The wait for 4.x is killing me.
  • Reply 64 of 66
    ranumranum Posts: 43member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mikemikeb View Post


    1. Couldn't the same thing be done with Bluetooth?



    2. 802.11g and n had been around for at least a year before Apple used it. You'd think they'd fast-track it with a few months' lead time, instead of using mature Bluetooth technology? Unlikely.



    Considering that Wi-Fi Direct devices were demo'ed in January of this year at CES, and, at least according to this article from last week at InformIT.com (http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1620205), the Wi-Fi Direct standard is set for official release sometime soon, it could very well be to the point where Apple would implement it. Apple is almost always among the first computer companies to implement the newest Wi-Fi standards when they are released.



    So, why Wi-Fi Direct over Bluetooth then? Here's the reason I think, quoting from the above article:



    "Wi-Fi Direct devices will operate at the same speeds or data rates and range as current Wi-Fi gear. This maximum of about 200 Mbps at 200 feet is much more than the 3 Mbps at 30 feet with Bluetooth. This means you can share and communicate much faster and farther with Wi-Fi Direct."



    I still think it's a good case for implementing Wi-Fi Direct technology on a device like the upcoming AppleTV/iTV.
  • Reply 65 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pt109 View Post


    I see these memes running around:



    1) The new device is related to Apple TV

    2) The new device runs iOS

    3) The new device will sell for under 100 US$

    4) The next Apple TV will include an app store and games

    5) The next Apple TV will include Facetime



    Some idle speculation:



    A) The new device is a cheap iPod Touch-like device suitable as a remote, a game controller and a Facetime dialer. It will run iOS and all of its functions (apps) will be runnable on existing Touch, iPhone and iPad devices. It will sell for 99 bucks.



    B) The next Apple TV is NOT the mystery device. It will remain OSX based and not be much cheaper than now. But, it will include an iSight so your living room TV can do Facetime, and enough cpu/gpu power to beat out the dying older generation of game console.



    The whole package is going to look alot more like an xbox or ps3 with controller and internet connections. I've been thinking that even the geniuses at Apple can't fight the 6-foot interface challenge: the LR tv needs 2 devices: one for the hand and one to support the connections.



    ...still no blu ray...



    I definitely hope the next event will bring a slew of FaceTime capable products as well as software updates for OS X to enable FaceTime in iChat. That to me would be huge and blow the competition away.



    Course if they do so without releasing the standard to public as promised they may blow the chance of it becoming widely adopted. Too many companies out there now want to squash anything that comes from Apple; they'd rather see good technology die and Apple suffer.
  • Reply 66 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ranum View Post


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mikemikeb View Post


    1. Couldn't the same thing be done with Bluetooth?



    2. 802.11g and n had been around for at least a year before Apple used it. You'd think they'd fast-track it with a few months' lead time, instead of using mature Bluetooth technology? Unlikely.



    So, why Wi-Fi Direct over Bluetooth then? Here's the reason I think, quoting from the above article:



    "Wi-Fi Direct devices will operate at the same speeds or data rates and range as current Wi-Fi gear. This maximum of about 200 Mbps at 200 feet is much more than the 3 Mbps at 30 feet with Bluetooth. This means you can share and communicate much faster and farther with Wi-Fi Direct."



    I still think it's a good case for implementing Wi-Fi Direct technology on a device like the upcoming AppleTV/iTV.



    Any remotes included in an AppleTV box (transmitting gyroscope data, button presses, etc.) probably wouldn't require any more than Bluetooth's bandwidth, over the short distance of the typical remote control. Bluetooth would be absolutely fine for the AppleTV. Plus, Bluetooth has been built into iPod touches and iPhones for a while, so putting it into the AppleTV won't be a challenge.



    WiFi Direct may be good for synching data between iDevices and computers, from anywhere in the house, so I can see Apple working to use it, eventually -- just not on a TV remote.
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