Digg founder says Apple iTV launch in September will 'change everything'

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  • Reply 121 of 258
    rot'napplerot'napple Posts: 1,839member
    Let's not forget that Steve Ballmer of MS will introduce their version "Windows 7 TV" coming in the fall... of 2012...



    I like our plan... I like it a lot... Ballmer was overheard saying...
  • Reply 122 of 258
    alandailalandail Posts: 679member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    No the first personal computer was the commodore pet released in January of 1977



    The Apple 1 was released in 1976, the year before the PET - the first personal computer with a keyboard, display output (TV) and built in programming language (basic) and was affordable.



    And for the other poster, my first computer was an Apple ][+ in 1980.
  • Reply 123 of 258
    cvaldes1831cvaldes1831 Posts: 1,832member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mikemikeb View Post


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by archer75 View Post


    For me to buy it, it needs 1080p, 7.1 audio, support for mkv's, DTS-MA HD/TrueHD so I can play my rips I already have. Then I will be excited.



    I find it unlikely that anyone could fit all that equipment into the space of an iPhone with modern technology.



    This is the classic "fanboy detached from the reality of consumer electronics manufacturing" scenario.



    Yes, it's possible, at the cost of thousands and thousands of dollars. Guess, what? It's not about one fanboy's interests.



    Remember that CmdrTaco (a.k.a. Rob Malda) made a similarly notorious comment when the iPod debuted. "No wireless. Less space than a nomad. Lame."
  • Reply 124 of 258
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mikemikeb View Post


    I find it unlikely that anyone could fit all that equipment into the space of an iPhone with modern technology.



    It?s very possible. Imagination CVD chip that can do High-Profile 1080p video, a 1GHz (or faster) A4 (or better) for all other processing, and an HDMI out. I don?t expect Component (or lesser) outputs this time around as I am guessing content owners will want HDCP on all output ports (I would).
  • Reply 125 of 258
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post


    Okay, so Windows Media Center is larger than Front Row.



    Please let us know how the bloatiness of any software is beneficial to Joe Consumer. Thanks.



    Ah, i thought he meant it greater than as in better than, not actually greater than in terms of market share. Oh well.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post


    This is the classic "fanboy detached from the reality of consumer electronics manufacturing" scenario.



    Yes, it's possible, at the cost of thousands and thousands of dollars. Guess, what? It's not about one fanboy's interests.



    Remember that CmdrTaco (a.k.a. Rob Malda) made a similarly notorious comment when the iPod debuted. "No wireless. Less space than a nomad. Lame."



    It?s actually pretty inexpensive. This technology has been around for a long time now. H.264 is easily decoded in HW with a tiny little chip. You take the entire PoP/SoC that is the A4 in the iPhone 4, swap in a 1080p decoder and you potentially have yourself the core of the next AppleTV. It could easily fit into a casing not much bigger than that. The biggest single part would likely be power supply converting the AC/DC. There is really not much bulk or cost to a device running ARM with little NAND. I think $99 is low looking at iSuppli?s cost breakdown of the iPhone 4 and iPad, but it?s possible.
  • Reply 126 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sofabutt View Post


    For $99 you get very limmited hardware and the opportunity to pay through the nose for monthly content. It'll be like having cable TV, but you'll need another $99 piece of hardware.



    I wish it was so cheap to watch TV with my cable provider - Rogers/Robbers



    * $99 for a terminal to HDTV (only $99 at time of purchase with HDTV)



    * $499 for each PVR (or pay $24.95 for rental)
  • Reply 127 of 258
    bartfatbartfat Posts: 432member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    Personal computers existed before the Mac

    Flash based music players existed with the iPod

    Cell phones existed before the iPhone

    Tablets existed before the iPad

    App stores existed before iTunes



    I see a troll is missing the point here App stores certainly did exist before the App Store, but there was definitely no centralized location to get any third-party apps. So in that sense, there was no App Store before the App Store.



    Apple just does it better... much better than the competition But you can't say that Apple doesn't make things more accessible to people, which is why their products tend to be more popular than competitors'.
  • Reply 128 of 258
    programmerprogrammer Posts: 3,409member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pwj View Post


    I have never and still do not see the value in having a set-top box that can run mobile phone applications. I mean, how are you supposed to interact with an iPhone app when you don't have a capacitive touch screen, an accelerometer, etc.?



    Just because it doesn't have a touch interface, nor has accelerometers, doesn't mean it can't run iOS and use AppStore. It will have its own apps and its own control interfaces, but there is still plenty of tech in iOS that it can leverage. Don't expect it to run any iPad or iPhone apps though.
  • Reply 129 of 258
    str1f3str1f3 Posts: 573member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    No the first personal computer was the commodore pet released in January of 1977



    Sorry to break your heart, but the first was the Lisa which was a GUI (given to by Zerox).



    The Commodore wasn't even interesting until the 64. At tha point it was able to play games. (which were classic). It wasn't until the 64 that I actually started to play games, which was all the commodore was known for.



    This is like saying the Altaire was the most important. It wasn't just by legacy.



    I should know. I was gaming by the time arcades were still popular in the 80's.
  • Reply 130 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by polar315 View Post


    Not going to get even remotely excited til you see where it will be coming in the near future. iPad in Canada is great but, the killer iBooks app...nowhere to be seen unless you count the public domain books. Huge disappointment it is not available here. Figure it will be the same for this one. Netflix is coming in September...Hate the cable company...hate the spokesman even more he is a goof.



    Try looking in iBooks again. They now have plenty of regular books in the Canadian iBooks. Sh*t my Dad Says, iPad Survival Guide, Postcard Killers, Rage of Angels, Hangman, Last Night at Chateau Marmont, Secret Daughter, Outliers, Tough Customer, Under the Dome. Those are the Top 10 Paid Books.
  • Reply 131 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aplnub


    What is the chance that existing AppleTV owners get the software update?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


    I'd say not likely. The existing ATV is an x86 device whereas iOS is designed for ARM chips. None of the apps would run without translation.



    This is simply not true! Virtually all iOS apps run [in various stages of their development] on x86 iMacs using the iPhone Simulator. You can develop iOS apps this way without spending a dime. To actually run your iOS apps on a device, you must register as a $99 per year developer.



    Obviously, there are certain iDevice hardware features you cannot test (GPS, etc.), but each version of the simulator is more robust,





    Quote:

    I think most ATV users will ditch their box when they see how small the new one is anyway. The old one will be a tough resell when the new one is so cheap - in fact, if anyone here has one, I'd say sell it right now. You can put OS X onto it of course and use it as a cheap server/Mac.



    If you think about the components needed to do this, they can fit inside a plug. Imagine a plug like the iPhone charger with an HDMI port coming out. It can be wifi or have an ethernet port.



    I can see using existing AppleTV for the basic function it currently provides, while a new AppleTV offers Video Overlay, more compelling games, etc. IOW, start enjoying the benefits and buy the new AppleTV for the family room and move the old one to the bedroom.



    Quote:

    The subsidy model they can use is interesting because if you think about normal TV, you get ads that can be skipped through. For each programme on this, they can show you an iAd or a standard ad that you can't bypass, which means they don't need to use so many ads.



    Also, the iAds, presumably, will be well done, interesting and targeted-- ads that you might be interested in watching...



    In fact, I can see the day that you tell your AppleTV: "Here's the things I am interested in (that I am looking to buy), please show me ads in this category-- let AppleTV be your private shopper (or at least ad filter).



    Quote:



    That's going to be a huge selling point. Porn companies don't really have a way to get explicit porn direct to your TV. Not only will they have one now but they'll all have to adopt HTML 5 video.



    TV channels will be websites or Youtube channels. In many ways not having content control or standards can be a bad thing but after a few years of cable TV, you start to see how bad their content is anyway.



    TV needs a shake-up and this is the best way to do it. The pricing model concerns me a bit but if they do pay-per-minute up to a cap then it should be ok. Pay-per-movie will relegate it to the status of an electronic Blockbuster and people will only use it to add to their cable viewing and use it infrequently.



    Porn, like water, seeks its own level!



    Your other points are well tken!



    ,
  • Reply 132 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Arthur Greenwald View Post


    Kevin Rose is a smart guy but apparently not well-versed in the media marketplace. There's a reason cable and satellite companies offer tiers of service with different packages of channels -- because consumers refuse to pay much more to buy those same channels "a la carte."



    I'm afraid you've put the cart before the horse there. Providers have been, from the very beginning, more interested in offering service tiers and packages than a la carte. Regulation was necessary to force them to offer channels individually and unbundled-- although these regulations often did not specify the prices, so packages are often much cheaper than individual channels.



    There is a reason for that. Content owners also want to bundle content in order to spread the risk. Content can be expensive to make, and only a few become wildly successful, a few more are mildly successful, and a great many of them are flops. Bundling forces... I mean, encourages service operators to take several cheap flops along with hit content-- whether it be individual shows sold to cable channels, or groups of channels sold by content owners to cable operators, or packages of first-run movies.



    In short, the reason why cable and satellite companies offer tiers of service with packages of channels is because it is more profitable for them to do so. That, when forced to allow users freedom of choice, they price those choices intentionally to funnel subscribers towards the package is also unsurprising. However, one should not be fooled into thinking that this is a case in which a free and transparent market has driven service operators towards the package method of selling, because that is completely false-- and backwards.
  • Reply 133 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by grking View Post


    No it was the commodore PET



    Wrong! It was the Northstar nee Kentucky Fried Computer, The Ohio Scientific, The Smoke Signal Broadcasting...



    ... Actually, the first microcomputer was the Altair:







    Fred Roberts was the inventor.



    It was created in Albuquerque, NM.



    Guess who wrote the BASIC for it?



    See those little lights and switches-- you entered your programs and data a Byte-at-a-time...



    Now, That's a UI!



    http://www.vintage-computer.com/altair8800.shtml



    .
  • Reply 134 of 258
    Has anyone thought of what the possibilities are for the iTV besides shows in the US?



    I would think that Apple will introduce gaming onto the TV, with the iPad or iPhone 4 as the controller if Apple doesn't invent a controller with it. It will be run through bluetooth or wifi. The developers will jump onto this as another revenue source. I think this iPad mini that will come out might be the missing link for gaming on TV. I hope this happens.
  • Reply 135 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jwdav View Post


    You might better ask what industries did he kill or remake - what would not exist or be different without him.



    Personal computers existed before the Mac

    -The Apple II running Visicalc killed mainframe computing (reborn as Desktop Computing)

    -The Mac & the LaserWriter killed the printing industry (reborn as Desktop Publishing)



    Flash based music players existed with the iPod

    -The iPod, along with iTunes killed the music industry distribution & pricing model



    Cell phones existed before the iPhone

    -The iPhone killed cell manufacturers who had no platform (Android will finish them off)

    -The iPhone killed the traditional cell carriers role



    Tablets existed before the iPad

    - The ipad killed the netbook, and created a whole new category of device

    -The iPad will probably kill print publishing of books and magazines as we know it

    -The iPad/iPod is taking a chunk out of the gaming industry



    App stores existed before iTunes

    -The app store killed traditional software distribution & pricing

    -The app store may kill many roles the "the web" is currently used for



    Together, the ipad and the app store may take a piece out of the advertising industry.

    The AppleTV may take a chunk out of the cable carriers



    Add in that the genesis of the web came from designs found in next and HyperCard



    Nice!



    .
  • Reply 136 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    Errr.... the touchscreen remote with accelerometer, etc. is in your hand (and your opponent', hand too)! They are called iPhones, iPads and iPod touches-- and maybe even the WiiMote!.



    Is it possible that with all my constant harping I've won my first convert?



    My "iTV" remote control prediction as it stands...
    • The main controller will be a WiiMote-like device

    • A touch sensitive surface (magic mouse style) around the thumb area will allow limited gestures (like up-down, left-right swiping/scrolling)

    • Other iDevices will be able to sync to the iTV for gaming or remote keyboards

    Did anyone ever work out what this was for? Could it be the thumb button on the new WiiMote-style remote?



    For anyone that hasn't seen it check here for the WiiMote patent.
  • Reply 137 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post


    Sorry to break your heart, but the first was the Lisa which was a GUI (given to by Zerox).



    The Commodore wasn't even interesting until the 64. At tha point it was able to play games. (which were classic). It wasn't until the 64 that I actually started to play games, which was all the commodore was known for.



    This is like saying the Altaire was the most important. It wasn't just by legacy.



    I should know. I was gaming by the time arcades were still popular in the 80's.



    Well, you don't know what you are talking about.



    My first computer store was selling computers in 1978... We were selling Altairs, NorthStars, Apple ][s while you were, likely, still in short pants!



    We installed our first LAN in 1980 at Saratoga High School, Saratoga, CA: 7 Apple ][ computers sharing a 5 MB Corvus Hard Disk (Only 2 Floppy drives and 1 printer for 7 computers).



    I suspect that you were entering high school in 1980!



    Before you got into playing games, major Fortune 500 companies were buying Apple ][s with VisiCalc (1979) to bypass the backlog and expense of IT implementing their apps on the mainframe. IT was called Data Processing, in those days, and, typically had a 2-year backlog with app study/implementation costs running into hundreds of thousands of dollars.



    AIR, You could buy VisiCalc for $79, A robust Apple ][ for $2-3,000-- and you were good to go! Departmental discretionary budgets were set high: $5,000, to take some of the pressure off Data Processing.



    Some of our customers included:



    -- IBM

    -- Coherent

    -- Fairchild Schlumberger

    -- Applied Materials

    -- Daimler Benz

    -- John Deere

    -- Dysan

    -- Memorex

    -- Piper Jaffery

    -- US Army

    -- Great America

    -- Adobe

    -- Dean Whitter

    -- Piper Jaffrey

    -- EMI Thorne

    -- Xerox

    -- Apple Computer

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    .
  • Reply 138 of 258
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Postulant View Post


    Hurry up already, I have 99 big ones and they're burning a hole in my pocket.



    That's gotta hurt.
  • Reply 139 of 258
    iansilviansilv Posts: 283member
    This seems reasonable, and fits with the high end ad-buy status iAds launched with. Apple tv cones out and the OTA broadcasters play along- stuff is free over the air, hey just broadcast it with iAds replacing regular advertising. If people want premium channels, they buy individual stations. Those stations sell their shows as apps, and can charge subscriber content, display iAds, or whatever the hell they want to do. So instead of plugging in antenna, I plug in an apple tv for ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, and for pay hannels- like MTV I buy an app. Seems perfectly plausible.
  • Reply 140 of 258
    ericblrericblr Posts: 172member
    From wikipedia"Early personal computers - generally called microcomputers - were sold often in kit form and in limited volumes, and were of interest mostly to hobbyists and technicians. Minimal programming was done with toggle switches to enter instructions, and output was provided by front panel lamps. Practical use required peripherals such as keyboards, computer terminals, disk drives, and printers. Micral N was the earliest commercial, non-kit "personal" computer based on a microprocessor, the Intel 8008. It was built starting in 1972 and about 90,000 units were sold. Unlike other hobbyist computers of its day, which were sold as electronics kits, in 1976 Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak sold the Apple I computer circuit board, which was fully prepared and contained about 30 chips. The first complete personal computer was the Commodore PET introduced in January 1977. It was soon followed by the popular Apple II. Mass-market pre-assembled computers allowed a wider range of people to use computers, focusing more on software applications and less on development of the processor hardware."
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