Android, iOS apps skirt privacy policy to share user data with advertisers

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    it's a common fear, not common knowledge, otherwise you'd be able to point to one iOS app that stores my name, address, and location history without my knowledge for advertisers. I didn't ask for a long list, I just asked for one. If it's common knowledge, naming one wouldn't be hard to do.



    You clearly know you are posing the question in a misleading way, and it's obviously your intent here to obfuscate the issue. Either that or you have absolutely no understanding of what you are talking about, which I seriously doubt. Your dishonesty on this topic is beyond transparent.



    As we all know, the issue is not about individual apps doing this, it's about ad networks doing it. So, basically, for example, any app that uses AdMob to deliver ads is guilty of this offense.
  • Reply 42 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    You clearly know you are posing the question in a misleading way, and it's obviously your intent here to obfuscate the issue. Either that or you have absolutely no understanding of what you are talking about, which I seriously doubt. Your dishonesty on this topic is beyond transparent.



    As we all know, the issue is not about individual apps doing this, it's about ad networks doing it. So, basically, for example, any app that uses AdMob to deliver ads is guilty of this offense.



    You're claiming that admob has a database that includes my name, address, app history, and location history? So you're basically saying they are lying with their own stated privacy policy?



    And what are they supposedly doing with this information? Where do they sell advertising that utilizes this information and exactly how are they collecting it? Where can I buy an ad that is targeted to, say, only people who have been to disney world in the past 2 weeks?



    I can believe that I could somewhere buy advertising that targets people in Disney World right not, but don't believe for a minute that I could buy advertising to people who were there last week.
  • Reply 43 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    You're claiming that admob has a database that includes my name, address, app history, and location history? So you're basically saying they are lying with their own stated privacy policy?



    And what are they supposedly doing with this information? Where do they sell advertising that utilizes this information and exactly how are they collecting it? Where can I buy an ad that is targeted to, say, only people who have been to disney world in the past 2 weeks?



    I can believe that I could somewhere buy advertising that targets people in Disney World right not, but don't believe for a minute that I could buy advertising to people who were there last week.



    You're becoming a bit ridiculous in your dishonest attempts at tracking denial. If Google's (which AdMob is part of) privacy policy says they aren't tracking this information, then, yes, they are lying. Between all the ad and tracking networks that are now part of Google, they definitely have all this information, and they are definitely sharing it across systems.



    Your example is also a bit ridiculous. Let's assume that you can't buy the kind of advertising you mention (people who were at Disney World last week). That's irrelevant to whether they actually have this information in their profiles, which they do.



    Your motives here appear more and more dishonest as you go on.
  • Reply 44 of 66
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I don't see Location Services themselves being a big issue, and certainly less of an issue than those that submit actual personal info to any number of sites. How many people use the same password or select few password for all their computing? How many put in real answers to security questions or the same false answers across all sites? How many people use real names and birthdays on sites? How many peopl post pictures of their homes, cars, spouse and children for the world to see? Out of all these things I'm just not concerned about letting FourSquare or TomTom know my location.



    Agreed. You have very little privacy these days unless you completely opt out of society and sleep under a bridge. Even then, the government will have pictures of you.



    Posting personal info is no big deal. Which royalty or celebrity doesn't have pictures of their homes, cars, and children all over the place. It is up to each person to protect their own assets, it is not the responsibility of governments, device manufacturers or network providers. Get real. Nobody gives a crap where you are anyway. You are just a pair of eyeballs as far as advertisers are concerned. Go ahead, stick it to the bastards and don't buy anything.
  • Reply 45 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Agreed. You have very little privacy these days unless you completely opt out of society and sleep under a bridge.



    How pathetic and disturbing that in a supposedly free society these are perceived as one's options.
  • Reply 46 of 66
    get rid of your mobile device period.



    the only other way I know to stop them is to turn off your phone when not using.



    If we need access get an ipod touch/wifi only iPad and connect to a mi-fi and again only turn that on wireless as we need it.



    btw, all the dumb phones from before the smartphone era had GPS location tracking built in so again the only sure way to avoid the authorities tracking us is to switch it off I think.



    You saw the Bourne films right and 24. Its all true. If you have an electronic device you can be tracked. Also who is to say there is not a gps locator in you car already that we don't know about



    Get over it- we are all being monitored and programmed. The Matrix is everywhere. Mammon has us. LOL. 2+2 = 5 brother
  • Reply 47 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    You're becoming a bit ridiculous in your dishonest attempts at tracking denial. If Google's (which AdMob is part of) privacy policy says they aren't tracking this information, then, yes, they are lying. Between all the ad and tracking networks that are now part of Google, they definitely have all this information, and they are definitely sharing it across systems



    what are they supposedly using this seemingly worthless information for and where is your evidence?
  • Reply 48 of 66
    Why is all this privacy issue ignored by Consumer Reports? They are still hung up on the supposed antenna issue. I know dozens of people with iPhone 4's and I asked every one of them about this, and not one sees a problem. Stupid magazine.
  • Reply 49 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    what are they supposedly using this seemingly worthless information for and where is your evidence?



    No disingenuousness left behind?
  • Reply 50 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    No disingenuousness left behind?



    I repeatedly as for some sort of evidence, you provide none and call me disingeous. I've also searched the web for anything to support your paranoid claims and again come up empty.
  • Reply 51 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    I repeatedly as for some sort of evidence, you provide none and call me disingeous. I've also searched the web for anything to support your paranoid claims and again come up empty.



    Go do some research on exactly what sort of information various ad and tracking networks collect and how they cross reference it to build profiles. But, then again, you aren't really searching in earnest. Yes, I'm accusing you of being knowingly and deliberately dishonest in your posts here.
  • Reply 52 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Agreed. You have very little privacy these days unless you completely opt out of society and sleep under a bridge. Even then, the government will have pictures of you.



    Posting personal info is no big deal. Which royalty or celebrity doesn't have pictures of their homes, cars, and children all over the place. It is up to each person to protect their own assets, it is not the responsibility of governments, device manufacturers or network providers. Get real. Nobody gives a crap where you are anyway. You are just a pair of eyeballs as far as advertisers are concerned. Go ahead, stick it to the bastards and don't buy anything.



    ha ha ha. Great post.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    I repeatedly as for some sort of evidence, you provide none and call me disingeous. I've also searched the web for anything to support your paranoid claims and again come up empty.



    Trust me, it simply ain't gonna happen. Ever.
  • Reply 53 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Groovetube View Post


    Trust me, it simply ain't gonna happen. Ever.



    So are you arguing that tracking/ad companies aren't collecting and cross referencing data to create personal, individual profiles?



    Just so we have your position on this straight.
  • Reply 54 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by magicj View Post


    It's theft, as your information belongs to you, not to Apple, Google, or Facebook (who also pulls these stunts). And when I say it's theft, I mean that literally. I believe they can be prosecuted for it.



    l.







    I'm not sure what sort of harvested information you refer to that rises to the level of a property interest.



    Certainly you don't mean public records, like your address and phone number. Nor your location, which is not a property interest either.



    What are you referring to when you claim that property is stolen?
  • Reply 55 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    So are you arguing that tracking/ad companies aren't collecting and cross referencing data to create personal, individual profiles?



    Just so we have your position on this straight.



    Uh no, and who is this 'royal we'?



    Enjoy, see 'ya.
  • Reply 56 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    So are you arguing that tracking/ad companies aren't collecting and cross referencing data to create personal, individual profiles?



    Just so we have your position on this straight.



    In other words, you have nothing to support your claims.
  • Reply 57 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Groovetube View Post


    Uh no, and who is this 'royal we'?






    I think it may be his not-so-subtle way of telling us he's one of them.
  • Reply 58 of 66
    I'm an editor at the WSJ, which published the apps report. Thanks very much to everyone here (and AppleInsider) for the interest.



    I see there's debate over tracking in general. Here are a few of the WSJ's investigative pieces that reveal the scope of the tracking business.



    The Web's New Gold Mine: Your Secrets

    (Inaugural WSJ investigation into online tracking)



    Microsoft Quashed Effort to Boost Online Privacy

    (Security measure was stripped out of IE8)



    On Web's Cutting Edge, Anonymity in Name Only

    (Bank uses online-gathered data to decide which credit-card to show you when you visit its website)



    A Web Pioneer Profiles Users by Name(

    Company builds personal profiles, adds in people's real names, religious interests, etc.)



    Insurers Test Data Profiles to Identify Risky Clients

    (Insurers experiment w/ replacing some blood tests with these data/profiles of people)



    This is only a small sampling. The entire WSJ investigative series is here: What They Know.



    Hope this is of interest and best regards.
  • Reply 59 of 66
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    So are you arguing that tracking/ad companies aren't collecting and cross referencing data to create personal, individual profiles?



    Just so we have your position on this straight.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Groovetube View Post


    Uh no, and who is this 'royal we'?



    Enjoy, see 'ya.



    So, really, you have no point at all. And, it was an editorial 'we'.
  • Reply 60 of 66
    blah64blah64 Posts: 990member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    I repeatedly as for some sort of evidence, you provide none and call me disingeous. I've also searched the web for anything to support your paranoid claims and again come up empty.



    I guess we should be in awe of your lack of Google skills. The WSJ alone has an entire series on the matter, as pointed out above. It's obvious you didn't really look, this stuff is commonly-known unless you live under a rock. Sorry Anonymouse, I was out most of the day, I'm surprised more people didn't join the conversation to point out the gross ignorance of those arguing against you.



    alandail: RapLeaf was all over the news a while back, here's just a couple links (literally 15 seconds of searching):



    Not only are these profiling firms monitoring you, but they're monitoring your friends as well, and using that information in your profile. Hope all your friends have stellar credit ratings.



    And it's not just RapLeaf, CNN says: "Acxiom, ChoicePoint, Quantcast, and BluKai also collect and sell your data, as do many others"



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    And advertising has always targeted demographics. You get different ads in sports illustrated than you do in soap opera digest. You get different ads when you watch NFL football than you get if you watch a lifetime movie. And in both cases if you are in one city watching your local cable network, you get some different ads than you would get in a different state.



    Contextual advertising is perfectly reasonable, and it's existed for probably 50+ years. Advertise toys on Saturday morning cartoons, and dishwashing liquid during the afternoon soaps. That is not privacy-invasive at all. But what's happening now is completely different because profiles of individual people are being created that the KGB would have fricking killed for back in the day. Literally. And lots of (very, very ignorant) people are willingly giving that data away for nothing. All for a little online coolness.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alandail View Post


    I can believe that I could somewhere buy advertising that targets people in Disney World right not, but don't believe for a minute that I could buy advertising to people who were there last week.



    Ready to come around yet? There's so much data and research around this that it's not funny.



    I don't know your history here well enough to know if you're just spouting off, but now would be the time to read the WSJ articles and about RapLeaf et al. Would love to see you come back with a different (educated) opinion.
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