Google TV hardware delayed as the Apple TV competitor struggles - NYT

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  • Reply 41 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post


    I doubt very much that TV executives (i.e., Hollywood) went begging to Steve to be a part of his insular, 99-cent world.



    You are right...



    They would much rather be part of Google's open, "Hey, we know you told everyone you would be releasing your new products at CES. But, NO Google TV for you!".
  • Reply 42 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    They don't have the experience in hardware design and GUI design that Apple does. They have the content, but a lot of it is just scraped from the Internet. Apple partners with professional content providers (e.g. studios). I think Apple is more likely to win this fight.



    Agree. A TV is a TV, a computer is a computer... and ne'er the twain shall meet.
  • Reply 43 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post


    I just can't see myself ever wanting to interract with my TV using a keyboard. The TV is there for me to consume and consume only.



    Yeah I can relate to what your saying. I bought a mac mini for my sons Xmas box this year and loaded some software on it through a 37 inch TV. Using a wireless keyboard and mouse just didn't feel right to me. I also found the distance from eye to screen unnatural and a bit of a strain when browsing the web. Needless to say it went back.



    TV is for video, tv shows and the like.
  • Reply 44 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iLiver View Post


    Has anybody yet figured out why Apple refuses to update the 1st gen AppleTV for NetFlix compatibility besides trying to rope you into buying a new one?



    I'm guessing there's a hardware limitation that prevents this. I'm not sure how the 2nd gen does it, but on many devices Netflix playback is tied to Silverlight. Netflix is supported on (I believe) all Boxee implementations except for the AppleTV. The Boxee team stated a year or so ago that they were close to getting it work, but simply ran into too many performance issues.



    Unfortunately, my other media device (the WDTV HD Live) has been superseded by the HD Live plus, the only difference being Netflix support. They state the firmware updates will keep coming for the older device, but that (due to, again, hardware limits) Netflix support will never come to the device.
  • Reply 45 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iLiver View Post


    Has anybody yet figured out why Apple refuses to update the 1st gen AppleTV for NetFlix compatibility besides trying to rope you into buying a new one?



    I suspect that the older Apple TV does not have a robust enough CPU and GPU to satisfactorily handle concurrent Internet streaming and Playing of video (ala NetFlix).



    Internet streaming is less predictable than streaming within the home on a WiFi network.



    Rather than do something marginally or poorly, Apple will choose to do nothing at all.
  • Reply 46 of 63
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iLiver View Post


    Has anybody yet figured out why Apple refuses to update the 1st gen AppleTV for NetFlix compatibility besides trying to rope you into buying a new one?



    My guess would be is that it's not worth it since the product is EOL.
  • Reply 47 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Google has reportedly asked makers of upcoming Google TV-powered television sets to cancel plans to show off devices as the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show, as the search giant is working to refine its software. ...



    I think the issue is not just "refine its software", which definitely needs refining, as does the hardware it is on, but there's also the issue that pretty much everyone started blocking Google TV within a few days of its release, so what exactly is it good for?
  • Reply 48 of 63
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iLiver View Post


    Has anybody yet figured out why Apple refuses to update the 1st gen AppleTV for NetFlix compatibility besides trying to rope you into buying a new one?



    More likely: The number of current users using the original AppleTV HW released almost 4 years ago may not make it worth developing a Netflix app for two units. When you consider the new one only costs $99 and Apple reportedly sold 250k in the first two weeks it makes sense.



    Less likely: Netflix may have required video paths that were completely HDCP compliant which excluded the old AppleTV which has analog connections and Apple didn?t want to have to exclude those ports from accessing Netflix as it would be more confusing for customer setups than simply using a demarkation point between new and old HW.





    PS: No wonder the original AppleTV failed, analysts called it a ?DVD killer? ensuring its demise. LOL
  • Reply 49 of 63
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    I suspect that the older Apple TV does not have a robust enough CPU and GPU to satisfactorily handle concurrent Internet streaming and Playing of video (ala NetFlix).



    I was going to put that as a ?Somewhat likely? point but then I remembered YouTube. Of course, using encryption and higher bitrates (or even plans for higher bitrates from Netflix) can alter that, but I didn?t have any solid evidence to back up that hypothesis.
  • Reply 50 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    More likely: The number of current users using the original AppleTV HW released almost 4 years ago may not make it worth developing a Netflix app for two units. When you consider the new one only costs $99 and Apple reportedly sold 250k in the first two weeks it makes sense.



    Hey now! I personally know four or five people who have them. Isn't that enough to justify it? ;-)



    Quote:

    Less likely: Netflix may have required video paths that were completely HDCP compliant which excluded the old AppleTV which has analog connections and Apple didn?t want to have to exclude those ports from accessing Netflix as it would be more confusing for customer setups than simply using a demarkation point between new and old HW.



    Not sure about that. Doesn't the Roku have HDCP-less connectivity? I know the Wii does and it's got Netflix support.
  • Reply 51 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I was going to put that as a “Somewhat likely” point but then I remembered YouTube. Of course, using encryption and higher bitrates (or even plans for higher bitrates from Netflix) can alter that, but I didn’t have any solid evidence to back up that hypothesis.



    Well, I hacked the original AppleTV (with a lot of help from Erica Sadun) and had it streaming all sorts of non-HD video from the web.



    It worked, barely, but there was no h264 compression/decompression involved -- just straight streaming at unpredictable IP carrier speeds.



    There were lots of hangs and aborts. It just didn't work predictably.



    To be honest, at that time, AppleTV hackers were shooting in the dark -- there was no iOS; no SDK, etc. The AppleTV hacking community was doing a lot of investigative work to see what existed in the AppleTV OS and what could be ported from Mac OS X.



    Then.. this thing called the iPhone came along... Overnight, it sucked the air out of AppleTV hacking.



    Today, with known AppleTV hardware, an SDK for the iPhone/iPad APIs for that same hardware, I suspect we'll see a revival in hacking for the AppleTV -- the AppleTV 2.
  • Reply 52 of 63
    iliveriliver Posts: 299member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    I suspect that the older Apple TV does not have a robust enough CPU and GPU to satisfactorily handle concurrent Internet streaming and Playing of video (ala NetFlix).



    Internet streaming is less predictable than streaming within the home on a WiFi network.



    Rather than do something marginally or poorly, Apple will choose to do nothing at all.



    So iTunes steaming, which it already has, would be quicker?
  • Reply 53 of 63
    Speaking of "hacking" the Apple TV 2...



    Erica Sadun is doing some neat stuff:



    This is her second non-hack, hack related to AirPlay and the AppleTV.



    AirFlick turns Macintosh into an AirPlay data server



    http://www.tuaw.com/2010/12/20/airfl...y-data-server/
  • Reply 54 of 63
    iliveriliver Posts: 299member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by djames4242 View Post


    Hey now! I personally know four or five people who have them. Isn't that enough to justify it? ;-)



    Must be that to some folks $99 is like chump change.

    If it could happen- that's a pretty lame excuse that a new one- cost ONLY $99.

    I own both and would like the 1st gen upgraded now that I have a NetFlix account. Seems fairly basic to me.
  • Reply 55 of 63
    alfiejralfiejr Posts: 1,524member
    For those who find ATV2 too limited in what it can do, the beta of aTVFlash "black" is available now.



    aTVFlash never worked consistently great on the underpowered ATV1. have to wait to hear how it does this time. but i would prefer real iOS apps.



    Apple is not going to update ATV1 (except maybe a bug/security patch). sorry folks, that's history. they want you to buy a new one.
  • Reply 56 of 63
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by djames4242 View Post


    Not sure about that. Doesn't the Roku have HDCP-less connectivity? I know the Wii does and it's got Netflix support.



    I think you are correct.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    Well, I hacked the original AppleTV (with a lot of help from Erica Sadun) and had it streaming all sorts of non-HD video from the web.



    It worked, barely, but there was no h264 compression/decompression involved -- just straight streaming at unpredictable IP carrier speeds.



    There were lots of hangs and aborts. It just didn't work predictably.



    But Netflix, just like YouTube, will stream H.264 that can be decoded on chip. I don?t see a technical reason why it wouldn?t work, only a cost to benefit reason to not include it.



    Quote:

    Today, with known AppleTV hardware, an SDK for the iPhone/iPad APIs for that same hardware, I suspect we'll see a revival in hacking for the AppleTV -- the AppleTV 2.



    It?s already been hacked and there is already Cydia, but I have to think Apple will be releasing an SDK for the AppleTV in the too distant future.
  • Reply 57 of 63
    1st thing - sorry for the long post, but...



    I don't know about all this... I think Google has the successful long term solution here, the big question is about buy-in from networks and studios. Having the Internet (and a computer of sorts) built right into the TV is a huge advantage if implemented properly.



    There are just some things AppleTV is no good at, like surfing on over to Hulu to watch missed TV shows. That's why I've skipped the AppleTV (and all its competitors) all together, and have a Mac mini as my entertainment center. Unlike a set-top box, the Mac does all the AppleTV functions (movies, music - iTunes/Front Row), does all the TV functions plus handle input from the Wii (EyeTV), does all the Internet media functions (Hulu, Netflix, YouTube, etc. via Safari), provides my phone service (MagicJack), plays DVDs, and does what set-top boxes can't - be a full computer (pictures, presentations, video conference, etc), all on a single device. I use the Apple remote (90% of the time), and Apple Bluetooth keyboard/mouse (10%).



    Don't get me wrong here, this setup is all about entertainment, NOT computing. I don't do computing on the TV, but rather I use a computer to manage all the media for the TV.



    AppleTV is thiiiiiis close to being the perfect device, but there are some major things lacking: A full web browser, no 1080p output (yes it is a big deal), no way to run regular HD 'TV' thru it (can't be a DVR), a severe (100%) lack of full HD content, and no 'screen sharing' (aka remote desktop).



    The AppleTV doesn't need to be a full computer to manage all the media one would like to throw at it. All it has to be capable of doing is to stream anything I want from any computer in the house through it. That way, if I'm playing a Keynote presentation on my laptop, I can send the image on my laptop screen to the AppleTV for display on the big screen. Right now, the AppleTV will only receive streamed iTunes media, not the actual image on the computer screen, so streaming one's desktop, a DVD playing on the computer, a video conference, a Keynote presentation, etc. is not possible.



    One of the other big goals in my opinion is to eliminate the dozens of boxes one has to connect to the TV (nest of wires) and switch between/control them all with complex remotes. It's silly! The idea that you have to switch and only view one input at a time is also silly! What if I want to watch something like Jeopardy! (without sound) while I listen to music? Regular TV/entertainment system? No way. But a computer does this just fine. This is where Google could win. Having the computer inside the TV, you eliminate another box connected to a fixed 'input', and you stream everything to the TV, either directly (web/apps) or from other computers in the house.



    Whoever figures out how to properly implement a computer inside the TV, a network connected one that can manage all your sources of media, receive any type of stream from connected computers, and be remotely controlled by a device like a laptop or iPod (cause remote controls with itty-bitty keyboards suck), then they will crack the market wide open and become the de-facto standard.
  • Reply 58 of 63
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by caliminius View Post


    Thank you, Apple Advertising Department!





    And YOU?



    Troll from Android, or Windows??????
  • Reply 59 of 63
    iliveriliver Posts: 299member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by razorpit View Post


    My guess would be is that it's not worth it since the product is EOL.



    EOL? Why is that? Apple doesn't support or have no love for prior gen products?

    Maybe because Apple makes very little money from NetFlix as their CEO was named Fortune's person of the year?
  • Reply 60 of 63
    diddydiddy Posts: 282member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iLiver View Post


    EOL? Why is that? Apple doesn't support or have no love for prior gen products



    Support != upgrades though. Support on discontinued products tends to be limited to repairs - not R&D to redesign things from the ground up which is what you are talking about. And that applies for different hardware revisions regardless of capability.
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