Samsung Galaxy Tab has 16% return rate, Apple's iPad just 2%

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
According to a new survey, 16 percent of those who bought a Samsung Galaxy Tab have returned the device to the store since its launch, compared with just 2 percent of buyers of Apple's iPad.



According to the Digital Daily, the Galaxy Tab had a 16 percent return rate from its launch in November through Jan. 15, based on data collected by ITG Investment Research. The return rate was found through a survey from nearly 6,000 wireless stores in the U.S.



The return rate for the Galaxy Tab was said to be 13 percent in December 2010, but the rate increased after the holidays. Return rates through Jan. 15 increased to 16 percent, according to the poll.



ITG also tracked purchases of the iPad through Verizon's retail stores in the U.S. The survey found that just 2 percent of buyers returned Apple's tablet since it debuted in late October.



It's more bad news for Samsung's first iPad competitor, as the company also revealed this week that sales to customers of the device were "quite small." Initially, Samsung had boasted that it sold 2 million of the Galaxy Tab since its launch in November.



But in reality, those sales were to inventory channels, and not actual consumers. In a quarterly earnings call with investors last week, Samsung executive Lee Kun-hee said that the sell-through to consumers was "quite small," though he added the company felt that its performance was "quite OK" given that it is the introduction of a new device.



The Galaxy Tab is powered by the Google Android mobile operating system, but runs "Froyo," a version of the software that was created for smartphones, not tablets. Google intends to transition Android to tablets with the forthcoming release of "Honeycomb," which will debut this year on the new Motorola Xoom.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64
    Hahahahahahahahaha!
  • Reply 2 of 64
    Of the 100% of the people that lose their mind.

    84% of them lose their receipt.
  • Reply 3 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bunnyturd View Post


    Of the 100% of the people that lose their mind.

    84% of them lose their receipt.



    LOL. Perfect.



    I guess some of the 84% were Christmas presents and the giver didn't forward the receipt.
  • Reply 4 of 64
    matrix07matrix07 Posts: 1,993member
    I bet someone here returned theirs all.
  • Reply 5 of 64
    So around 14 GTs were returned...
  • Reply 6 of 64
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,891member
    More specifically the lack of a market steward to provide the infrastructure and leadership Apple provides. I still think there is more potential in Playbook than Android. Android may recover if major corporation gets behind it, right now that is not Googgle.
  • Reply 7 of 64
    cmvsmcmvsm Posts: 204member
    That's because the Galaxy's interface is nothing short of a Greek tragedy....or steamy pile....whichever you prefer. Samsung needs to de-badge that POS before it tarnishes their good LCD name!
  • Reply 8 of 64
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Am I the only that thinks 16% is low for the Tab and 2% high for the iPad? My reasoning is 1) people likely know the iPad much better as a product before buying, and 2) iOS for iPad, the SDK and apps were designed with the iPad display size in mind, which is not the case with Froyo.
  • Reply 9 of 64
    Enough. Please stop embarrassing them any further.
  • Reply 10 of 64
    Hey...in the age of Apple, no iOS = no immediate success. Clearly.
  • Reply 11 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Am I the only that thinks 16% is low for the Tab and 2% high for the iPad? My reasoning is 1) people likely know the iPad much better as a product before buying, and 2) iOS for iPad, the SDK and apps were designed with the iPad display size in mind, which is not the case with Froyo.



    Depending on the margin of error, the iPad return rate could be "0%," or statistically insignificant. Keep in mind this survey only sampled Verizon in-store sales, which I imagine is a very, very small percentage of total iPad sales. Plus they are encumbered by the MiFi personal hotspot device, which may be a turnoff to the less techie-types, thus higher return rates.
  • Reply 12 of 64
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post


    Depending on the margin of error, the iPad return rate could be "0%," or statistically insignificant. Keep in mind this survey only sampled Verizon in-store sales, which I imagine is a very, very small percentage of total iPad sales. Plus they are encumbered by the MiFi personal hotspot device, which may be a turnoff to the less techie-types, thus higher return rates.



    I just found this.
    So Jobs announced that the iPhone 4 return rate was 1.7% and the 3GS was 6%. While a phone does have a hefty data plan a cellphone is deemed a necessity these days, while tablet computers are not, though the iPad doesn?t come with a data plan, except perhaps in the case you mention.
  • Reply 13 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Am I the only that thinks 16% is low for the Tab and 2% high for the iPad? My reasoning is 1) people likely know the iPad much better as a product before buying, and 2) iOS for iPad, the SDK and apps were designed with the iPad display size in mind, which is not the case with Froyo.



    Nonsense. All manner of consumers are buying the iPad with only a vague notion of what they're getting into. I work in retail and one of the staff members from our electronics department was chatting with me about the iPad and it was painfully obvious said sales associate was rather unclear about what exactly the iPad is.



    I don't doubt there are consumers buying the iPad thinking they are getting a full-function computer that just happens to come in touch-screen tablet form.



    Apple is years ahead and will remain so as long as there is a dedication to pushing the envelope, so to speak, as if there were real competition.



    The iPad comes with a larger screen, beats the competition on price, and has a far better OS. What it does, it does in a polished, enjoyable fashion. It has to be the most evolved, mature new-category product ever. Soon Apple will raise the bar that much more. Like shooting fish in a barrel.
  • Reply 14 of 64
    "The survey found that just 2 percent of buyers returned Apple's tablet since it debuted in late October."



    Maybe its early, but what am I missing here? Didn't the iPad hit the streets of the US last spring? At least that's when I bought mine.
  • Reply 15 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmvsm View Post


    That's because the Galaxy's interface is nothing short of a Greek tragedy....or steamy pile....whichever you prefer. Samsung needs to de-badge that POS before it tarnishes their good LCD name!



    Dont you mean Geek Tragedy



    Actually Ive never used it so I cant comment but its based on Java so Im guessing its clunky and slow
  • Reply 16 of 64
    xsuxsu Posts: 401member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jondrew View Post


    "The survey found that just 2 percent of buyers returned Apple's tablet since it debuted in late October."



    Maybe its early, but what am I missing here? Didn't the iPad hit the streets of the US last spring? At least that's when I bought mine.



    The numbers mentioned here covers Verizon customers only
  • Reply 17 of 64
    According to the Digital Daily, the Galaxy Tab had a 16 percent return rate ....





    Ok. For a minute there I thought they were talking about rate of return..... Clearly that´s not the case.
  • Reply 18 of 64
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post


    Nonsense. All manner of consumers are buying the iPad with only a vague notion of what they're getting into. I work in retail and one of the staff members from our electronics department was chatting with me about the iPad and it was painfully obvious said sales associate was rather unclear about what exactly the iPad is.



    You think consumers as a whole are just as knowledge of the iPad as they are the Galaxy Tab, because that is what I implied when I wrote, “people likely know the iPad much better as a product before buying”? If you watch TV you’ll see iPad ads. If you go to an Apple Store you see about 10 iPads out for people to experience. Where is the equivalent number of hands and eyeballs for the Galaxy Tab? I don’t think there is one.
  • Reply 19 of 64
    mytdavemytdave Posts: 438member
    I would be interested to find out, by way of a more extensive survey of several retail channels, just exactly how many Galaxy Tabs found their way into actual customer hands. "Quite small" doesn't tell us much.



    Along those lines, more accurate real return rates for both iPad and "Gal-tab" would be interesting to know.
  • Reply 20 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    You think consumers as a whole are just as knowledge of the iPad as they are the Galaxy Tab, because that is what I implied when I wrote, ?people likely know the iPad much better as a product before buying?? If you watch TV you?ll see iPad ads. If you go to an Apple Store you see about 10 iPads out for people to experience. Where is the equivalent number of hands and eyeballs for the Galaxy Tab? I don?t think there is one.



    The ads suggest that the iPad can do oh so many things. It never brings up the matter of the iPad not exactly being a netbook in tablet form. Never comes up, nor should it.



    And as for hands-on in the store. So people pick it up and play with it for a minute or two. That hardly serves to reveal all.



    You are naively assuming that everyone is as computer-savvy as you are, however much that might be. Truth is that most folks barely have a clue about the computer they use. They learn just enough to do what they need to and no more.



    The success of the iPad is that it does a number of useful things quite well and so most people don't mind keeping the product even once they realize it's not quite what they think it is. The competition has a long way to go to get their OS right and their products use smaller screens and are rather pricey for what you get. The iPad has an interface that is familiar to many consumers who have bought Touches by the millions.
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