Apple's VP of software technology to be witness at US congressional hearing

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  • Reply 21 of 27
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,223member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Same pay as Warren Buffett I believe. Couldn't have anything to do with taxes on capital gains of course.\



    No.



    Not even sure what (remote) connection is.
  • Reply 22 of 27
    magicjmagicj Posts: 406member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


    this trimble guy, whats he do?



    Sounds like a techie. Here's his wiki entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bud_Tribble ):



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wikipedia


    Guy L. "Bud" Tribble, MD, PhD, is Vice President of Software Technology at Apple Inc. Tribble served as the manager of the original Macintosh software development team where he helped to design the Mac OS and user interface.[1] He was among the founders of NeXT, Inc., serving as NeXT's vice president of software development.[2] Bud is one of the industry’s top experts in software design and object-oriented programming.[3]



    Tribble's career includes time at Sun Microsystems and Eazel. At Eazel, he was vice president of Engineering leading development of next generation user interface software and Internet services for Linux computers.[4] Tribble was also chief technology officer for the Sun-Netscape Alliance, responsible for guiding Internet and e-commerce software R&D. Tribble earned a BA degree in Physics at the University of California, San Diego and an MD and PhD in Biophysics and Physiology at the University of Washington, Seattle.



    Whereas the Google guy sounds like a dyed in the wool lobbyist (http://www.netcaucus.org/biography/alan-davidson.shtml ):



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee


    Alan Davidson is the head of U.S. public policy for Google. Alan opened Google's Washington DC office in 2005. He has written and spoken widely on Internet policy issues including privacy, free speech, encryption, network neutrality, and copyright online.



    Prior to joining Google, Alan was Associate Director of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a public interest group promoting Internet civil liberties. Starting in 2000 he has also served as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University's program in Communications, Culture, and Technology.



    Like many Googlers, Alan started professional life as a computer scientist. He worked as a Senior Consultant at Booz-Allen & Hamilton, where he helped design information systems for NASA's Space Station Freedom. Alan has an S.B. in Mathematics and Computer Science and an S.M. in Technology and Policy from MIT, and a J.D. from Yale Law School.



    Also note that Google is a member of the Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee, whereas Apple is not. http://www.netcaucus.org/advisory/
  • Reply 23 of 27
    hittrj01hittrj01 Posts: 753member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


    Here's the list from the same source for Obama's opponent, John McCain. Notice where your culprits are on his list. These companies hedge their bets by playing both sides.



    Top Contributors to John McCain 2008

    Merrill Lynch\t$373,595

    Citigroup Inc\t$322,051

    Morgan Stanley\t$273,452

    Goldman Sachs\t$230,095

    JPMorgan Chase & Co\t$228,107

    US Government\t$208,379

    AT&T Inc\t$201,438

    Wachovia Corp\t$195,063

    UBS AG\t$192,493

    Credit Suisse Group\t$183,353

    PricewaterhouseCoopers\t$167,900

    US Army\t$167,820

    Bank of America\t$166,026

    Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher\t$159,596

    Blank Rome LLP\t$154,226

    Greenberg Traurig LLP\t$146,437

    US Dept of Defense\t$144,105

    FedEx Corp\t$131,974

    Bear Stearns\t$117,498

    Lehman Brothers\t$114,357



    Wow, that is quite a big disparity between the parties. Goldman Sachs gives Obama nearly $1 million, but gives McCain only $230,000? I don't think that's called playing both sides, that's called throwing a bone to McCain just to make him think he hasn't been forgotten.
  • Reply 24 of 27
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,580member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


    I had high hopes upon Franken's election to the Senate. He's a smart guy and I generally share his political philosophy. But I'm wondering what he was thinking in calling this hearing. I'm not saying there aren't real issues in general that need addressing. But the particular issue that spawned this hearing--"tracking gate"-- has been blown out of proportion. By going nuclear on it he comes off looking like just another congressional witch hunter. Either he is not aware that level heads have judged this matter overblown, or his politics are more libertarian than progressive. Either way I am a little disappointed.



    Or, he sees the publicity the issue this generated as the perfect time to focus attention on, and raise the level of public awareness of, the problem of private companies engaged in mass cyber-stalking of citizens. Sounds pretty progressive to me. I'd wait to see how the hearings go before getting disappointed.
  • Reply 25 of 27
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,580member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post


    Wow, that is quite a big disparity between the parties. Goldman Sachs gives Obama nearly $1 million, but gives McCain only $230,000? I don't think that's called playing both sides, that's called throwing a bone to McCain just to make him think he hasn't been forgotten.



    That's called hedging your bets. The probably apportioned their donations based on the total amount budgeted and the perceived odds of each candidate winning. So, Goldman obviously rated Obama as a 4:1 favorite to win the election.
  • Reply 26 of 27
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,303member
    Back on topic, it is worth noting Apple already fixed the issue in iOS. So I am happy, even if my god dammed horse didn't win.
  • Reply 27 of 27
    magicjmagicj Posts: 406member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    Back on topic, it is worth noting Apple already fixed the issue in iOS. So I am happy, even if my god dammed horse didn't win.



    Yeah. If this congressional hearing focuses on technology, Apple will do fine. However, if it becomes a political game, Google is much better positioned than Apple to play that game, it seems to me.



    Regardless of the intent or outcome of the hearings, Google and Apple have different views on privacy issues. Google is investing in the political space to promote its views. Apple doesn't seem to be doing that.
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