Hard drive upgrades restricted in Apple's new Thunderbolt iMacs

1356

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 105
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Maltz View Post


    That's true, but auto manufacturers also don't go out of their way to make you buy a new car (or take it to the dealer) if you have the skills and tools to, say, change your tires yourself, either.



    I'm really hoping that this report is in error. Apple has never been terribly proprietary in regards to hard drives or RAM. (Yes, they used SCSI drives instead of IDE in the 80's/90's, but that was a performance choice. They were standard SCSI drives.)



    The reasoning behind not supporting SSD caching baffles me.



    How about OS support? How about waiting to see if it actually works or not? How about finding out what the performance increases really are and if they apply to the largest swath of users?



    The tech sounds cool but if you listen to the This Week In Computer Hardware (last nights podcast) it's NOT as straightforward as the Intel marketing dept would lead you to believe.
  • Reply 42 of 105
    modemode Posts: 163member
    Wow... the greed. Insatiable epic greed.



    I knew I bought my last Mac Pro a few years ago... but always thought the iMac would be around as an option.



    The environmental impact of this alone should make Apple completely ashamed.

    I replace HDD's for people all the time (as it's the main reason older systems fail). People aren't going to fork over laughable extortionist prices for a HDD. It will be like when a logic board fails... just throw the whole machine away.



    Apple is pushing out their ethical investors faster then predicted.



    Consumerism is a sickness - not something to be celebrated and base an economy on.

    Success based on the size of our landfills.
  • Reply 43 of 105
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Maltz View Post


    That's true, but auto manufacturers also don't go out of their way to make you buy a new car (or take it to the dealer) if you have the skills and tools to, say, change your tires yourself, either.




    Well, if you're going to use changing tires as being 'consumer maintenance friendly' .... then I would suggest that installing memory yourself would fall into the same category ... so I think my comparisons are still valid ... no?
  • Reply 44 of 105
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TenThousandThings View Post


    Yes, it makes no sense. I can't believe that Apple wants to be the only avenue for repairs and upgrades to the drives, especially after the warranties expire on these machines.



    It's quite likely that maxinc's comment earlier is accurate, and the OWC report that this story was based on was not entirely accurate, especially the bit about there being a "custom" SATA connector. If so, Apple Insider should update this story, since people don't read all the comments, and it is contributing to an unfounded panic.



    Apple isn't the only avenue for repairs. Anyone can get certification from Apple to do repairs. And frankly, Apple generally will do a repair faster than any other outlet out there. I've seen MacBook repairs turned around in a day where the motherboard was being replaced, and that was even while sending it to Texas.



    Apple sends a ton of out of warranty service my way because I think they really do want to be the only avenue for WARRANTY WORK.
  • Reply 45 of 105
    bwikbwik Posts: 562member
    What is the best Windows 7 based iMac alternative? I am suddenly curious.
  • Reply 46 of 105
    madhatter61madhatter61 Posts: 116member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Inkling View Post


    Thanks Apple for giving me another reason not to upgrade my iMac. Having the drive hard to reach is bad enough. Having it non-standard is even worse. The iMac is becoming something you have to throw away when anything breaks.



    Do you really think that older Macs can be upgraded by savvy folks, like yourself so it is like the new stuff they are offering? Hardware and software development go hand in hand and Apple has an advantage other manufacturers don't have...they make it work. When they make changes they don't expect the user to just go out and buy an off the self part (whatever) ... and expect it to be a direct substitute. If it breaks get the proper part ... if you can't fix it ... find someone who can. I know you're smarter and can do it yourself with off the shelf parts... lots of luck.



    I read so much of the ranting stuff that really doesn't make any sense.



    I couldn't resist commenting on what I consider a silly viewpoint. Ranting won't change what is, but maybe you'll get some sympathy from other ranters. FWIW.
  • Reply 47 of 105
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,378member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by maxinc View Post


    The OWC report is quite inaccurate and I wish they did some more testing or at least read the forums before creating mass panic.



    The SATA data connectors are very standard and so is the SATA power cable feeding the hard drive. The only difference is that they used 7 wires instead of 5, probably some extra grounds.



    I installed a Vertex3 SSD and used a plain 4 wire Y-splitter sata power cable which effectively discards the 3.3V from the apple's wiring and only feeds 5V and 12V to the original drive. Guess what, fan speed is as quiet as it can get and the Apple Hardware Test passes successfully.



    I went further and moved the internal HDD from SATA0 to SATA1 port to better accommodate the SATA connector for the SSD and this didn't create any adverse effects.



    Another member of the forum swapped the 1TB WD Black with a 2TB WD Black and again, no adverse effect, Hardware Test completed successfully.



    With the SSD in place now, the only thing I can hear is my breath reflected by the glass screen



    The mods should shut this thread down after this post. Or edit the story.



    It's disappointing -- but not at all surprising -- to see many posters continuing their yapping and venting, without their bothering to read what's been said in the thread so far.



    I am reposting it for that reason.



    (Thanks, maxinc).
  • Reply 48 of 105
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post


    This image shows a 7pin connector on a Maxtor drive from 2004. If this is what they are talking about it is not new.



    I can accept that they are using pins for something new, but that wouldn't necessarily make anything incompatible as others have shown with their testing.



    You're looking at the data connector and the report refers to the power connector which physically is still the same as all SATA drives. What has changed it that a regular SATA power cable uses 4 pins (out of 15 total) and the new iMac uses the same 4 pins plus 3 additional pins for reporting drive conditions.
  • Reply 49 of 105
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bwik View Post


    What is the best Windows 7 based iMac alternative? I am suddenly curious.



    <crickets>
  • Reply 50 of 105
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by popnfresh View Post


    With the advent of the first iMac, Apple seemed to embrace open standards, like USB. Gone were proprietary standards like ADB and localtalk.



    There were good reasons to drop ADB, but being proprietary wasn't the first or even main one, since other companies, such as Sun, also used the bus.



    Quote:

    Alas, with Apple's astounding success over the last decade has come an arrogance that believes that open standards are no longer in Apple's best interest. We saw this trend with the latest MacBook Air and its proprietary SSD.



    Yeah, the "proprietary" SSD that you can get from vendors like Other World Computing.



    There are plenty of things to tweak Apple about; but one should choose things that actually do apply.
  • Reply 51 of 105
    gxcadgxcad Posts: 120member
    I was always hesitant due to the super glossy glass, but this move significantly decreased the chances I would purchase an iMac, which is a shame . Beautiful, yes. Right for me? Maybe not...
  • Reply 52 of 105
    desuserigndesuserign Posts: 1,316member
    The sky is falling again!?



    Why is there always such hysteria over nothing when it concerns Apple products?
  • Reply 53 of 105
    maxincukmaxincuk Posts: 11member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gxcad View Post


    I was always hesitant due to the super glossy glass, but this move significantly decreased the chances I would purchase an iMac, which is a shame . Beautiful, yes. Right for me? Maybe not...



    It is sad but the only thing decreasing the chances for you of purchasing a new iMac is the OCW false and incomplete report which is made worst by the press quickly picking up the story.



    The hard drives in the 2011 are much easier upgradeable than the 2010 as seen here. Many users, me included have done it.



    http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost...0&postcount=48
  • Reply 54 of 105
    maxincukmaxincuk Posts: 11member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    The mods should shut this thread down after this post. Or edit the story.



    It's disappointing -- but not at all surprising -- to see many posters continuing their yapping and venting, without their bothering to read what's been said in the thread so far.



    I am reposting it for that reason.



    (Thanks, maxinc).



    The only thing they did was to ban my account for no specified reason after I posted the 2nd message.
  • Reply 55 of 105
    onhkaonhka Posts: 1,025member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by maxincuk View Post


    The only thing they did was to ban my account for no specified reason after I posted the 2nd message.



    They did?



    Funny, you are still available under maxinc.
  • Reply 56 of 105
    maxincukmaxincuk Posts: 11member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Onhka View Post


    They did?



    Funny, you are still available under maxinc.



    I created another id. Not sure what happened to the original one. but I got this message when I posted the 2nd message:



    Quote:

    You have been banned for the following reason:

    No reason was specified.



    Date the ban will be lifted: Never



  • Reply 57 of 105
    bregaladbregalad Posts: 816member
    While it was interesting to see that someone replaced a 1TB drive with a 2TB one from the exact same manufacturer and model line, that doesn't prove that I can stick any drive I want into an iMac and have it work properly.



    Even if I was willing to let Apple do the labour to replace a dead hard drive out of warranty it would drive me crazy to pay 50-100% too much for the part.
  • Reply 58 of 105
    ruel24ruel24 Posts: 432member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post


    Bonehead.



    Embracing open, commonly supported standards is what got Apple here. Now Apple wants to relive the nineties.



    That's what I was thinking, but let's hold out until more information comes forward. Let's not jump to any conclusions, just yet.
  • Reply 59 of 105
    maxincukmaxincuk Posts: 11member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bregalad View Post


    While it was interesting to see that someone replaced a 1TB drive with a 2TB one from the exact same manufacturer and model line, that doesn't prove that I can stick any drive I want into an iMac and have it work properly.



    It was my mistake and I apologise. It was a 1TB Seagate that was replaced with a 2TB WD Black as seen here: http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost...0&postcount=48



    Another user added a 3TB Seagate Baracuda XT without any problems.

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost...9&postcount=65



    Granted there may be some incompatibilities out there, but stating that apple had restricted the upgradability of the new iMacs is just wrong. They, in fact, made it easier compared to the 2010 iMac since the silly thermal sensor is no longer required.
  • Reply 60 of 105
    ruel24ruel24 Posts: 432member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jackaninny View Post


    You're looking at the data connector and the report refers to the power connector which physically is still the same as all SATA drives. What has changed it that a regular SATA power cable uses 4 pins (out of 15 total) and the new iMac uses the same 4 pins plus 3 additional pins for reporting drive conditions.



    Coming from someone that doesn't own an iMac, this completely doesn't make sense. The SATA power connector connects straight to the power supply on normal computers. Does it split the wires? How would it get information from a power port? It would make sense if they use additional pins on the SATA data connector, but not the power connector. Am I missing something?
Sign In or Register to comment.