Android device activations now exceed 500,000 per day

1235712

Comments

  • Reply 81 of 228
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jetz View Post


    Bragging about profit share is particularly moronic in my books. Unless I own stock in a company, I see any bragging about contributing to said company's profit margins, as a sign that I'm a poor consumer and shopper.



    A poor consumer and shopper is the person who is totally biased against a product based on one criteria...
  • Reply 81 of 228
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,330member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jetz View Post


    They can be the proverbial canaries in a coal mine. A teenager has far less invested in a platform he/she has been using for a few years compared to a somebody who's older and may have been using a platform right from launch. This makes them fickle consumers.





    Nobody said Apple is weak. People just get needlessly worked up with these stories. Android and iOS can co-exist quite happily. And indeed they'll have to...especially once Android starts showing up in your fridge, your washing machine, your car, etc.



    Any "android" in my fridge will not be capable of much. I've heard these stories about linux before. Didnt happen. All a fridge needs is to close properly, dammit.



    Cars, I can see. I am of the opinion, heretical here, that Apple should licence to markets they cant possibly enter themselves.
  • Reply 83 of 228
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by slapppy View Post


    Android has already won market share. If not today, then very soon. It would be silly for Apple to compete with that. iPhone will sell less and less and in a few years, its out of the game. Better concentrate on iPads while they can. Eventually Google/Android will win that also and goodbye iPads.



  • Reply 84 of 228
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,330member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by slapppy View Post


    Android has already won market share. If not today, then very soon. It would be silly for Apple to compete with that. iPhone will sell less and less and in a few years, its out of the game. Better concentrate on iPads while they can. Eventually Google/Android will win that also and goodbye iPads.



    Well that was a convincing argument, all the same, with incredibly worked out stats and links to sources, and a clear mathematical brilliance in working out industry trends in the next few years.



    You have certainly changed my mind, sir, kudos.
  • Reply 85 of 228
    Since there is no real third party agency that would be interested in proving this claim, Rubin can randomly speculate upward numbers.



    But who really cares about these numbers even if they were 2M activations per day? All these are lame until Rubin announces a single Android device that outsells any iOS device.



    Rubin is just trying to fool Google to keep his job after the Honeycomb 3.0 fiasco on tablets, most notably Xoom.
  • Reply 86 of 228
    rongoldrongold Posts: 302member
    Rubin seems to be presenting only part of the picture in this Tweet.



    What he fails to mention is that a great number of these Android activations are being accumulated through unhappy users selling a particular model to somebody else (eBay, Cragslist, etc.) and that Android phone then makes it's way into somebody else's hands to be activated yet again under a different number.



    This makes for an inflated projection of the number of Android phones. This 500,000 a day number certainly doesn't add up to the number of NEW Android phones being sold.
  • Reply 87 of 228
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,336member
    My city has had consistently experienced 500,000 toilet flushes every day and it's growing by 4.4% w/w.
  • Reply 88 of 228
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 89 of 228
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 90 of 228
    jetzjetz Posts: 1,293member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    Oh absolutely it won't kill Android, but it produces an overall bad experience. I would love to see a survey that matches purchasing intent with current ownership - ie. what percentage of iPhone owners intend to buy an Android as their next phone versus vice-versa.



    Yet that may not be a sign of "bad experience" in so much as it may be a sing of lock in...how many iPhone owners won't want to move because of all their music on iTunes and all the apps they bought, even if they don't necessarily think the iPhone is the optimal solution for them?





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    Android's growth is often cited as proof of iPhone's weakness, but the two are mostly uncorrelated, and will remain so for as long as there are so many weak platforms to devour.







    Source: Asymco





    I fully agree. Personally, I have never agreed with the thesis that Android's growth has anything to do with the iPhone...other than perhaps the iPhone popularizing touchscreen smartphones. Then again, coming from Symbian I don't buy the whole Android copied the iPhone thing either. Android is far, far more similar to Symbian (to me) than it is to an ianything. And a large part of why I went Android actually was because it was a rather easier transition. iOS can seem utterly foreign if you're coming from another smartphone OS.
  • Reply 91 of 228
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post


    And Porsche got taken over by Volkswagen (after unsuccessfully trying to take over Volkswagen).



    I believe I read recently that the income from the iPhone alone exceeds Google's entire gross income.

    If that's true, then the analogy is more 'Porsche vs Schwinn'.
  • Reply 92 of 228
    jetzjetz Posts: 1,293member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post


    A poor consumer and shopper is the person who is totally biased against a product based on one criteria...



    Agreed. And that's why I never rule out anything and never swear by any single brand for anything I buy....



    ps. Just in case you think so...I'm not biased against Apple products...I own some of them. I just dont' share blatant dislike for all things Android like some here....funnily enough I get called an Apple fanboy on other sites. LOL.
  • Reply 93 of 228
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,330member
    I want to quote from Steve Jobs on Market Share vs Profit.



    Jobs has a theory about that, too. Once a company devises a great product, he says, it has a monopoly in that realm, and concentrates less on innovation than protecting its turf. "The Mac-user interface was a 10-year monopoly," says Jobs. "Who ended up running the company? Sales guys. At the critical juncture in the late '80s, when they should have gone for market share, they went for profits. They made obscene profits for several years. And their products became mediocre. And then their monopoly ended with Windows 95. They behaved like a monopoly, and it came back to bite them, which always happens."
  • Reply 94 of 228
    shrikeshrike Posts: 494member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anthropic View Post


    The truth of the article in my experience is that Apple has tried to maximise profit by spoon-feeding features to the market for far too long, because they know Apple fanboys will buy each new version even if there is almost no real difference in it except maybe a new front facing camera or an extra few megapixels.



    Eyes on the prize. The prize is always to make money. It's not to have the largest marketshare, though that has a strong correlation.



    Google's business model with Android is to give away the software, enabling large marketshare w/Google service use, and make money from search, web advertising. This business model commoditizes hardware and software. It is the antithesis of Apple's business model.



    Apple will not sacrifice profits for marketshare, and they will try to maintain their premium vendor status and lower marketshare numbers. They've already moved to the next big thing with the iPad. In another few years, they will try to find another or define another emerging profit center.



    And the "fanboy" talk is stupid. You don't sell 10m to 20m handsets a quarter to fanboys. They sell a premium product that masses of people want to have. I wish people would stop the troll-language.



    Lastly, Google has not given an accounting on how much money they are making with Android.



    Quote:

    I love Apple laptops, but the iPhone just isn't as good as some of the Android phones now, so unless they can find a way to innovate massively with iPhone 5 they will continue to lose market share and potential profit. I traded in my iPhone 4 for a Samsung Galaxy S2 and frankly it is a far superior phone, all the iPhone apps I used are on Android, it's got a bigger screen, it's faster, more configurable and just easier to work with.



    Good for you.



    Quote:

    Seriously it is THAT much better, you should really take a look after the iPhone 5 comes out and actually ask yourself which is truly the better device. I'd be surprised if iPhone 5 is as good as Samsung Galaxy S2 when it gets the next version of Android.



    Yes, the iPhone 5 will be just as good if not better than the Galaxy S2. There's nothing magical about this. The SGS2 is an early cycle phone using 2011 hardware (dual-core Cortex-A9, 2011 display, RAM, storage, etc). The iPhone 4 is now a late cycle phone using 2010 hardware. When Apple ships the iPhone 5, it will be using 2011 hardware, and be at parity or better than the SGS2.



    iPhone 5 with iOS 5 and iCloud will be just as good or better than the SGS2 with ICS, and they'll be in direct competition for about 9 months if the iPhone 5 is shipped in September.



    Quote:

    Now I know some of you will get really mad and have a fit over what I wrote but let me just ask you to take a few deep breaths and really think for a minute about what it is that got you upset? It's just an opinion based on experience in words on a screen. Nothing to get worked up about.



    Nothing to get upset about. It's the eventuality of the business models. Apple is looking for profits through hardware sales and fat margins on them. Google is looking for profits through advertising space and fat margins on them. It's hard to beat "free", and Apple wasn't going to have dominant marketshare at all with their premium market strategy.
  • Reply 95 of 228
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,330member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shrike View Post




    Apple will not sacrifice profits for marketshare, and they will try to maintain their premium vendor status and lower marketshare numbers. .





    Jobs has a theory about that, too. Once a company devises a great product, he says, it has a monopoly in that realm, and concentrates less on innovation than protecting its turf. "The Mac-user interface was a 10-year monopoly," says Jobs. "Who ended up running the company? Sales guys. At the critical juncture in the late '80s, when they should have gone for market share, they went for profits. They made obscene profits for several years. And their products became mediocre. And then their monopoly ended with Windows 95. They behaved like a monopoly, and it came back to bite them, which always happens."





    I honestly reckon if Steve Jobs came on here, was verified as Steve Jobs, and said that exact statement we would still get the "Apple dont care about Market Share" response. People would probably tell him to p*ss off. What does he know?
  • Reply 96 of 228
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


    I want to quote from Steve Jobs on Market Share vs Profit.



    Jobs has a theory about that, too. Once a company devises a great product, he says, it has a monopoly in that realm, and concentrates less on innovation than protecting its turf. "The Mac-user interface was a 10-year monopoly," says Jobs. "Who ended up running the company? Sales guys. At the critical juncture in the late '80s, when they should have gone for market share, they went for profits. They made obscene profits for several years. And their products became mediocre. And then their monopoly ended with Windows 95. They behaved like a monopoly, and it came back to bite them, which always happens."



    So... does this mean that sooner or later Apple will go for market share over profits with the iPhone?



    Interesting quote.
  • Reply 97 of 228
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 98 of 228
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post


    It's like saying that Porsche is failing because it's selling fewer cars than Ford. Not everybody likes Porsches, and a Porsche isn't the right car for a large number of people - who might prefer something cheaper and more practical. Nevertheless, all Porsches are aimed at a relatively affluent market segment and turn a much higher profit margin than a Ford Focus does.



    It's not quite the same thing. Market share is one of the factors a developer would use to determine which platform to develop for, and in which order.



    If Porches needed a specific type of fuel then it would be hard to justify owning one as you might only be able to use it in a few places that sold that type of fuel.



    No one (here) wants to see Android as the primary development platform, and iOS supported as an afterthought.
  • Reply 99 of 228
    Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

    TI bet many people who buy an Android phone are just buying a phone, and don't really know or care that it has Android installed.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post


    Yeah, like my older brother. Though I wish he would have asked me first. I would have steered him to the Verizon iPhone. Oh well.



    i actually switched to android after iPhone 1 - 3, and in my experience the op system is buggy, and i hate how moto gets their grimy hands on the software after Google. I also prefer the screen size of the iPhone to the huge android screens on the premium devices. However, for me i won't go back to iPhone until 2 things happen: 1) Flash (i use it to watch too many videos), 2) custom alerts for text, email, talk, etc.
  • Reply 100 of 228
    I don't think this matters much to Apple except for the perception it creates.



    As I see it...



    1. More people are buying smart phones today than feature phones. I'm pretty sure I read somewhere recently that smart phones are now the majority of phones sold, but I can't recall the actual reference (so I could be in error about "majority"). So the base of available smart phone buyers is expanding. Apple's share of those smart phones is also growing. As long as they continue to grow their installed base at a rate that maintains their profit margin, I don't think they give a hoot how many Android phones are sold. There will always be people who choose to buy something other than Apple. In the future, many of those will switch...and not switch back.



    2. I don't have any hard, factual data to support my next assertion, just anecdotal evidence, but how many folks do you know that purchased any flavor of iPhone and now use another brand as their primary phone. Personally, I can not think of a single one. Many iPhone users (myself included) are on their second or third generation of iPhone. You probably have some Crackberry users that demonstrate similar loyalty, but I don't suspect that is true of any model/brand of Android phone. My experience has been that many of those users change phones like they change clothes. To me, this is similar to the desktop computer model where folks jump from Asus to HP to Dell to...in many cases, Apple. I know of few (none?) who willingly switch back.



    A corollary to item two is that, as we've seen from other data, iOS users are far more likely to buy into (literally as well as figuratively) the entire ecosystem. They have invested in apps, music, movies, accessories, etc. Switching to another system can be expensive and/or painful. That investment in the ecosystem, the quality of the products, the general integration and ease of use, and investment in learning the iOS system, engenders great loyalty (can you say "fanboy"?). As long as Apple continues to support those multiple investments through future generations of the product line, I think they can only continue to grow their installed base. I believe the equation will continue to be: new iOS users coming in > any iOs users going out. I don't see that equation changing any time soon.



    If, indeed, that continues to be the case, then it really doesn't matter how many alternative operating system activations there are.
Sign In or Register to comment.