Apple's iCloud faces consumer confusion over 'cloud computing'

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  • Reply 21 of 71
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,953member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


    Access a Pages document on a PC?



    At least look at it and add notations from the web app, like an editor would note desired changes on a manuscript, but wouldn't edit it for you. This was demonstrated and available for at least a year now.
  • Reply 22 of 71
    I know what cloud computing is and that is all tha matters.
  • Reply 23 of 71
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by resnyc View Post


    Just for the sake of conversation, and because there may be others like me who aren't so tech-savvy, what _is_ the next platform?



    I won't pretend to be particularly tech-savvy, and I speak here only with opinion and (hopefully) a minimum of assumptions.



    I would say that the "next platform" is still mobile computing. New mobile device iterations coming yearly with significant improvements prove that the platform is far from fully matured.



    The advent of cloud computing represents a solution to a basic problem of mobile computing: how can these mobile devices be useful when all your data is landlocked on a home or office PC? Cloud Computing builds roads between cities of information. This is a logical lateral progression of an application, and that's why Cloud Computing is not a "platform."



    For now, all I can see is widespread integration of mobile devices, and it's already happening as we see full end-user computers built into automobiles, touch screens on airplane seats, etc. The Cloud will support these implementations and give them real meaning. Still, that does not constitute a platform, it's just another tool, a really useful one.



    Perhaps the next platform will be personal integration, something that creates a standard for any user to be recognized by any device, such that elevators, taxis, public transit, consumer transactions, etc. can all be personalized to recognize individual users for efficiency, preferences, and ease of use.
  • Reply 24 of 71
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 2,486member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


    Access a Pages document on a PC?



    Yes, from the cloud you could open your Pages file as a Pages file, PDF file, or a MS Word file.
  • Reply 25 of 71
    gustavgustav Posts: 827member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post


    What's really confusing is that you're not really putting your data in the cloud with iCloud, you're mirroring it there.



    They should have called it 'iMirror.'



    Mirror implies just two copies though. Unless they call it "iFunhouseHallOfMirrors," but that doesn't really resonate, does it.



    It's really a sync repository.
  • Reply 26 of 71
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    I view "cloud" as separating the what from the how. Store this - I don't care how. Compute this and send me the result - I don't care how. You just throw the problem at the network. It's service provision, as against DIY.



    Does iCloud fit that model? The save dialogs in iApps do, when you want to save something you can just say "save to the cloud" and be done with it. The media syncing side of it though, not sure.
  • Reply 27 of 71
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by maccherry View Post


    I know what cloud computing is and that is all tha matters.



    If you actually want to use cloud computing, then no, that's not all that matters. If you want some company to actually invest in a system that you can use, it's important that many potential customers know about it - not just you. That's what matters.
  • Reply 28 of 71
    gustavgustav Posts: 827member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by auxio View Post


    Ditto. I plan on using iCloud kinda like an off-site backup. My main backup will still be local, but in case my house burns down and I'm not able to get my backup out, I'll still have a copy of the really important stuff.



    Obviously the 5GB limit means it'll mostly be small stuff. If it works well enough, I might spring for more storage space (comparing costs with other backup services).



    You do realize you can't just put arbitrary files on iCloud, right. Only apps that support iCloud can put their documents in the iCloud. There is no iDisk functionality. If you want that, you'll need DropBox or a similar service.



    Now, it may be technically possible for an app to accept arbitrary files and put them in the cloud. But I suspect they'd have to be encapsulated in some sort of archive first. I haven't read the developer docs yet to know if this is possible.
  • Reply 29 of 71
    Hmm...why don't people understand buzzwords that don't mean anything and who have no hands on experience with? Truly a mystery...
  • Reply 30 of 71
    gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post


    What's really confusing is that you're not really putting your data in the cloud with iCloud, you're mirroring it there.



    They should have called it 'iMirror.'



    Ah, therein lies confusion. You don't mirror 'to the cloud', you copy to the cloud then mirror to all of your devices.

    Yet another subtlety that will confuse the waders. Add to that the difference between 'data in the cloud' vs 'apps and data in the cloud' and you have more confusion as to what 'the cloud' is.

    This is a paradigm shift that definitely has some risk, and Apple needs to handle education carefully.
  • Reply 31 of 71
    adonissmuadonissmu Posts: 1,776member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gustav View Post


    You do realize you can't just put arbitrary files on iCloud, right. Only apps that support iCloud can put their documents in the iCloud. There is no iDisk functionality. If you want that, you'll need DropBox or a similar service.



    Now, it may be technically possible for an app to accept arbitrary files and put them in the cloud. But I suspect they'd have to be encapsulated in some sort of archive first. I haven't read the developer docs yet to know if this is possible.



    I hope Apple allows me to buy more space for a fee.
  • Reply 32 of 71
    Apple should refer to it as "North Carolina computing".

    When someone asks "where is my data?"...in North Carolina.
  • Reply 33 of 71
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post


    I hope Apple allows me to buy more space for a fee.



  • Reply 34 of 71
    bushman4bushman4 Posts: 862member
    Perhaps as time goes on Cloud Computing will have more uses. While its definitely a plus at this point most of the people I work with as well as myself don't see this as a game changer. But knowing Apple they have something in mind.
  • Reply 35 of 71
    firefly7475firefly7475 Posts: 1,502member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iluomo View Post


    One quote comes to mind:



    "Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread."



    That would have been poignant indeed... had the year been 2005 instead of 2011.
  • Reply 36 of 71
    markbyrnmarkbyrn Posts: 662member
    iCloud is primarily a support system for iDevices so you can use them sans a PC plus some added functionality such as syncing bookmark, calendars, contacts, documents, etc. across iDevices and PCs. Unless iOS 5 and iCloud arrive out of beta in the KISS (Keep it Simple Stupid) state and Apple explains it simply, it will be a confusing debacle. As for myself, I have a PC (Mac) and I see no pressing reason to use iCloud as a backup but I'll certainly use the secondary features.
  • Reply 37 of 71
    grmacgrmac Posts: 67member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by brutus009 View Post


    Cloud computing is just a new name for an old thing. A survey on whether or not people understand what cloud computing is just demonstrates marketing penetration.





    Cloud Computing is a pretty name that will bolster the monitizing of something that currently exists largely as free app-to-hardware infrastructure. We're lucky that current aplications continue to utilize a freemium model.



    Consumers ought to be made aware. We need to fight for this infrastructure to remain free, even expect it, to encourage widespread implementation. This is a stepping stone to something much bigger, and I think keeping it free will play a large role in advancing to the next platform.



    Indeed. It will help folks understand better by relating the concept to their primary exposure to technology. For instance, the Cloud to me is similar to handing my boxes of punched cards to the man in the white cloud coat at the data center. I can then access my program from various terminals...
  • Reply 38 of 71
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,746member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gustav View Post


    You do realize you can't just put arbitrary files on iCloud, right. Only apps that support iCloud can put their documents in the iCloud. There is no iDisk functionality. If you want that, you'll need DropBox or a similar service.



    There is a section in the iCloud settings called "Storage & Backup". I'm assuming that if you're using iCloud from your Mac, you'll be able to back anything up to it. But therein lies some of my confusion: what exactly does "Storage & Backup" mean?

    Quote:

    Now, it may be technically possible for an app to accept arbitrary files and put them in the cloud. But I suspect they'd have to be encapsulated in some sort of archive first. I haven't read the developer docs yet to know if this is possible.



    Nope. Anything an app stores is fair game to be synced via iCloud. In fact, it would appear that by default, all of the files stored in certain locations within an app are synced if a user enables the "Documents & Data" iCloud setting. But again, it's not completely clear without reading the detailed documentation about it.
  • Reply 39 of 71
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member
    Any time you see the word "cloud" in the context of computing, just mentally substitute "internet" for "cloud." And see how much clearer things become.



    For example:



    Quote:

    The leading cloud services for users were e-mail, tax preparation and online gaming.



    becomes



    Quote:

    The leading internet services for users were e-mail, tax preparation and online gaming.





    Quote:

    "Whether they understand the terminology or not, consumers are actually pretty savvy in their use of cloud-based applications," said Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis for NPD.



    becomes



    Quote:

    "Whether they understand the terminology or not, consumers are actually pretty savvy in their use of internet-based applications," said Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis for NPD.



    See how easy that is? Substitute "internet" for "cloud" and everything just makes sense. And it also sounds like the sentence could have been written in 1997.



    The term "cloud" came from the nebulous cloud images used in flow charts. Yes, those ancient pictographic descriptions of processes and networks. The internet connection(s) between sites, whether it was wired or wireless, was drawn as a shapeless form. Because it didn't matter exactly how the data got between locations. Data is routed between servers and it gets there. Et voilÃ*.



    Now "cloud" includes turnkey internet server solutions. As in "Pay us money and we'll set up a server farm for you where land is cheap. Trust us." And those have been around for decades.



    Like they say in Hollywood, "There may not be any new stories. But there's always a new audience."
  • Reply 40 of 71
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


    Access a Pages document on a PC?



    Yes. Documents uploaded from iWork are stored in native and PDF format.
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