Google announces plans to acquire Motorola Mobility for $12.5B

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  • Reply 181 of 236
    [QUOTE=Dick Applebaum;1921421]
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by droideggs View Post


    As a tech enthusiast, I'm STOKED!



    ... Lotsa' crap





    Ha!



    Maybe what GOOG was after was a workable STB for GoogleTV



    They're going after the baby monitors, Dick...



    They'll corner the market. After all... isn't that the first thing most babies say... "google google google..."
  • Reply 182 of 236
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Maybe. But Google is an incredibly aggressive company with a culture of manifest superiority. They regard themselves as the smartest people in the room, always.



    Given that, are they really going to be able to keep their hands off how Motorola designs and delivers phones? Andy Rubin now has a captive hardware design and manufacturing outfit to play with. Is he really going to just deliver the OS like always, or is he going to be interested in getting his hands into the Moto process, the better to deliver the best phone possible? And if he gets his hands into the Moto process, how long before Google starts making "improvements"? After all, Google people are going to encounter Moto people and you have to figure that the Google people are going to consider a lot of them old and second rate, because that's how Google rolls. Do you think they'll just shrug and let them do their thing? Or will they start "suggesting" some key personal to kick things up a notch?




    Interesting perspective. But I disagree.



    Andy Rubin is decidedly smart, accomplished ... when it comes to software. But what's his background and track record when it comes to hardware design? Even if we assume he had a big say in the design of the Sidekick at Danger, it was nothing remarkable (although, in terms of function, the product arguably helped to usher in the smartphone era).



    Rubin already has had chances to influence if not control the design of Android phones in the Nexus reference series. Although each Nexus phone has been interesting and ahead of previous Droids, none has been groundbreaking or a standout. This is not surprising - Andy Rubin is not Steve Jobs. He is not Jonathan Ive. (Of course, they are not Andy Rubin either.) There is something special about the Apple culture built by Jobs that leads to the unique products that it generates. Jon Rubenstein took a bit of that magic with him to Palm, resulting in the distinctive Pre and WebOS. Neither Google nor Motorola has that kind of culture. Merging them will not produce it. This is no slag on either, for both are very good at what they do.



    All to say, I expect to see improvement in the integration of hardware and software as a result of this merger, but I don't expect landscape shifting changes in the hardware.
  • Reply 183 of 236
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freckledbruh View Post


    Just read an interesting observation at ars technica. This acquisition means that Motorola is the ONLY handset maker that now has official legal indemnity for using android. I wonder if the other OEMs will pressure google and insist on this considering their current legal woes.



    That's important - and is one more reason why one of the other handset makers might be interested in the hardware portion of the business if Google decides to sell it off. Google could include indemnification and a license with the sale of the hardware division.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by droideggs View Post


    As a tech enthusiast, I'm STOKED!







    Stoked? You really want Google controlling your living room, car navigation system, home phone systems, business home systems, etc?
  • Reply 184 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sheff View Post


    I have a love hate relationship with the hometown phone maker, but I gotta say that it is a very good development for Chicago as we really need more tech firms in the area. Sure we have groupon, but chicago really does not pull its weight in technology, at least not as much as in the financial sector. We'll see what will come out of this.



    As a former denizen of ChicagoLand (McHenry County, actually) I am familiar with the area. You had some tech companies, Moto... Bell & Howell comes to mind... but, back then (1968-1971) Sears, KraftCo, and the like were the biggies...



    Anyway, I new Moto was in the Chicago area, and the semiconductor business was in Phoenix. I just assumed that MMI remained in Phoenix.



    Ahh... the memories... Currency Exchanges... No branch banking... Mayor Daley... dyeing the Chicago River green for St. Paddy's Day... then someone waterskiing (avoiding the brown lumps)... being at the corner of Golf Mill Road and Golf Mill Road... The 1968 Democratic Convention... Tornado warnings... basements...
  • Reply 185 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    That's important - and is one more reason why one of the other handset makers might be interested in the hardware portion of the business if Google decides to sell it off. Google could include indemnification and a license with the sale of the hardware division.







    Stoked? You really want Google controlling your living room, car navigation system, home phone systems, business home systems, etc?



    you say 'controlling' i say 'fully integrated'



    We live in a 'facebook' world now. One cannot stay anonymous to your connected devices. All devices are tracked. Its the new reality. Its how said company uses your personal data is whats important. I am personally not 'afraid' of being tracked by Google.



    Carriers track your location

    ISP's track how much bandwidth you use

    Facebook monitors what you like and dislike, and sells your personal information to 3rd party entities

    Your credit score and finances can be checked through various online resources

    Websites have been tracking your internet surfing habits for years through cookies

    The list goes on...



    This whole notion of 'Google gonna control your life' is a weak argument.
  • Reply 186 of 236
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    You may well be right. I think that Chrome OS always has been "Plan B".



    The questions I have is:



    1) Is there enough usable capability (without a cloud connection)?



    2) Even when the cloud is available -- how does it perform compared to native apps that are close(r) to the hardware?



    3) How successful will Google be pushing Chrome OS as an alternative to Android -- seeing how they will have screwed over and pissed off their partners and competitors, alike?



    4) Does anybody trust Google -- even [especially] with the things that they do well?






    Lots of people apparently trust Google with things they do well. They are by far the #1 search company. Android is the top mobile platform. Gmail has millions and millions of users. Google+ has grown faster than Facebook. So yeah, lots of folks trust Google.
  • Reply 187 of 236
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Stoked? You really want Google controlling your living room, car navigation system, home phone systems, business home systems, etc?



    His name is droideggs. Pretty sure he does.
  • Reply 188 of 236
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by droideggs View Post


    yeah, a lot of layoffs short term in Chicago is what I see incoming.



    I don't know ... Although this is a typical consequence of mergers, Google has never carried out mass layoffs. Do they have the stomach for it?
  • Reply 189 of 236
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    As a former denizen of ChicagoLand (McHenry County, actually) I am familiar with the area. You had some tech companies, Moto... Bell & Howell comes to mind... but, back then (1968-1971) Sears, KraftCo, and the like were the biggies...



    Anyway, I new Moto was in the Chicago area, and the semiconductor business was in Phoenix. I just assumed that MMI remained in Phoenix.



    Ahh... the memories... Currency Exchanges... No branch banking... Mayor Daley... dyeing the Chicago River green for St. Paddy's Day... then someone waterskiing (avoiding the brown lumps)... being at the corner of Golf Mill Road and Golf Mill Road... The 1968 Democratic Convention... Tornado warnings... basements...



    How's Chicago enjoying their new mayor, BTW?
  • Reply 190 of 236
    [QUOTE=island hermit;1921424]
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post




    They're going after the baby monitors, Dick...



    They'll corner the market. After all... isn't that the first thing most babies say... "google google google..."







    ...Thanks for unfixing my quote... you really have a nasty streak! Touché!
  • Reply 191 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


    I don't know ... Although this is a typical consequence of mergers, Google has never carried out mass layoffs. Do they have the stomach for it?



    what are all the Moto-Blur software developers going to do? I have a feeling a lot of software engineers on Moto side will get the boot? Or maybe GOOG might be nice enough to take them under their wing. Lets see how this plays out. I'm extremely excited about this news though.
  • Reply 192 of 236
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by droideggs View Post


    what are all the Moto-Blur software developers going to do? I have a feeling a lot of software engineers on Moto side will get the boot? Or maybe GOOG might be nice enough to take them under their wing. Lets see how this plays out. I'm extremely excited about this news though.



    We don't even have an announcement that Moto is going to kill Moto Blur with this merger, though certainly there will be great jubilation in the Android community if Moto promises to abjure hideous reskins in future and stick with stock android.
  • Reply 193 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


    Lots of people apparently trust Google with things they do well. They are by far the #1 search company. Android is the top mobile platform. Gmail has millions and millions of users. Google+ has grown faster than Facebook. So yeah, lots of folks trust Google.



    I don't think you can equate using Google Services with trusting Google. They do some things very well -- and it would be self-defeating not to use those services.



    But trust... No!
  • Reply 194 of 236
    djmikeodjmikeo Posts: 178member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post


    Apple can not have equal leverage if Android has already more than twice the market share of iOS. Apple, MS, RIM and others have spent big bucks already to ensure that Android is not free. Well, now it looks like Android may well remain free and then some. Apple might have to pay more royalties to Android than the other way around.



    We'll see... but, imo, Google just made the rest of the industry look like chumps...



    I wouldn't call $12.5B free. Also, Apple can still sue HTC, MOTO and Samsung. Some are already paying a MS tax.
  • Reply 195 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    I don't think you can equate using Google Services with trusting Google. They do some things very well -- and it would be self-defeating not to use those services.



    But trust... No!



    i mean, in theory, no private citizen should 'trust' any publicly traded company whose sole purpose is to expand profits on a quarterly basis.



    so in this regards, yes, trust nobody, especially corporations
  • Reply 196 of 236
    cloudgazercloudgazer Posts: 2,161member
    Florian Mueller has a second interesting post on the subject



    http://fosspatents.blogspot.com/2011...ak-up-fee.html



    I'm not entirely sure I agree with him, or even that he's making a coherent argument, but the suggestion that the patents are not the whole story seems plausible.
  • Reply 197 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by djmikeo View Post


    I wouldn't call $12.5B free. Also, Apple can still sue HTC, MOTO and Samsung. Some are already paying a MS tax.



    It would be free in the sense that Google may well be in the position to make Apple sit down and talk... or fight to the death in a patent war. Remember... MM is also suing Apple... which now means that Google is suing Apple.



    Google foots the 12.5 billion bill not the phone manufacturers.



    ... and we'll have to see if this changes the landscape with MS at all.
  • Reply 198 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    Florian Mueller has a second interesting post on the subject



    http://fosspatents.blogspot.com/2011...ak-up-fee.html



    I'm not entirely sure I agree with him, or even that he's making a coherent argument, but the suggestion that the patents are not the whole story seems plausible.



    I haven't read the Mueller post yet...



    But, on another thread the below was posted. This indicates that Google may have bought its way into the living room by virtue (sigh, pun) of Moto's TV STB business and close dealings with ComCast/NBC.



    Scary...







    Quote:
    Originally Posted by droideggs View Post


    +1 THIS



    I think the real story is, aside from getting all those patents, Google now has access to millions of living rooms now.



    Comcast uses Motorola boxes for their cable set top boxes in California atm. I think this will continue on to the rest of the states.



    I posted this on other thread, but I do believe its highly relevant to this discussion







  • Reply 199 of 236
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post


    Incorrect - Moto had significant cash from the demerger. 3BN in cash according to Yahoo.



    http://ycharts.com/companies/MMI/cash_on_hand



    And at the rate Motorola is burning thru cash, that won't last very long. Motorola is up against not only Apple and Nokia, but also Samsung and LG (and possibly HP, if they ever get their act together). All of them are larger, with better balance sheets.



    Like I said, if this deal were just about patents, Google could have bought those off Motorola for a couple billion, giving them the cash they need to compete with the big boys over the long haul. Google didn't buy Motorola for the patents. They bought them because they're about to change the Android business model.
  • Reply 200 of 236
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by droideggs View Post


    you say 'controlling' i say 'fully integrated'



    We live in a 'facebook' world now. One cannot stay anonymous to your connected devices. All devices are tracked. Its the new reality. Its how said company uses your personal data is whats important. I am personally not 'afraid' of being tracked by Google.



    Carriers track your location

    ISP's track how much bandwidth you use

    Facebook monitors what you like and dislike, and sells your personal information to 3rd party entities

    Your credit score and finances can be checked through various online resources

    Websites have been tracking your internet surfing habits for years through cookies

    The list goes on...



    And one Google to rule them all.......



    I can't imagine anything online that's scarier.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by droideggs View Post


    This whole notion of 'Google gonna control your life' is a weak argument.



    Not given Google's unending string of theft of IP and violation of personal privacy.
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