'Unprecedented' demand for Apple's iPhone 5 exceeds iPhone 4 hype

1235

Comments

  • Reply 81 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fazworld View Post


    lamewing,



    how did you transfer your phone number to another phone without signing another contract?



    >> I am in that boat. I sold my out of warranty 3GS phone last month and am currently using my Samsung Focus (not Mango - I wish) until Apple releases the iPhone 5. I will upgrade and renew my contract if the new iPhone is more than an incremental update. If it is just a minor update I will keep using my Samsung Focus and relegate my app usage/music enjoyment to my iPod Touch.



    Can't you pop the sim card in a new phone and it will ring your phone number?
  • Reply 82 of 108
    Let me get this straight. Apple has not announced the existence of "iPhone 5" or ever acknowledged that is the chosen name of the next version of iPhone, so ChangeWave calls it "iPhone 5" and does a survey on it? Next survey: how many people want to buy a "BMW X8"? We just made the name up, but hey, valid survey question, right?
  • Reply 83 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mytdave View Post


    Yes, the iPod is the gateway drug to the iPhone (grin, couldn't resist), but I think someone has their demographics mixed up, and sometimes experimenters don't become addicts. Different places in the country/world may have different scenarios, but I'm in a fairly well educated demographic, where the iPod touch is being used by 8-12 year old kids, and the teens (13-19) have already 'graduated' to smart phones, all of them. Literally, I don't think there is a teen on our block without a smartphone.



    The iPhone indeed seems to be selling to a lucrative 25-49 year old age group... The problem is the 13-19 group I just mentioned. That age group, in the area where I live, already have smartphones and they're mostly Android. The 20-25 year old folks seem to be mixed ~50/50.



    Apple does need to captivate more teen attention in the iPhone department, because those future customers are leaning toward Android.



    I think someone else hit on the much more practical reason for the popularity of the Android platform with the younger age groups... Price.



    Let's face it, a LOT of parent are pretty hard pressed to shell out the extra money for an iPhone for junior. Especially if you have a couple of them running around. Couple that with the fact that the iPhone service plans are significantly more expensive than you could find with say an Android phone on Sprint. You do the math... If you have a pair of teenagers at home you can buy them both a new Android phone for the price of a single iPhone, and then you can probably save another $50+ per month on the service plan. When you factor in cheerleading, karate, tutoring, the bump in your car insurance rates once they start driving, saving several hundred a year on the cell phone bill is a big incentive to NOT buying them iPhones.



    The other aspect to this is that those who's parents let them choose what to do with their allowances... Junior can blow ALL his monthly stipend on his iPhone or he can have an extra $40 per month by shopping around for a cheaper alternative. The college crowd is pretty much the same. iPhone or an extra $40 or so per month for beer?



    Price is the determining factor here. My guess is that a significant portion of these people using Androids would have iPhones if there was no difference in price.
  • Reply 84 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by airnerd View Post


    Can't you pop the sim card in a new phone and it will ring your phone number?



    you can't just take out the sim card and put it into another phone. in fact, the 3GS doesn't have a removable sim card.
  • Reply 85 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fazworld View Post


    you can't just take out the sim card and put it into another phone. in fact, the 3GS doesn't have a removable sim card.



    You're terrible at lying. Unless by "3GS" you mean "some other phone that isn't an iPhone at all".
  • Reply 86 of 108
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by svnipp View Post


    I think someone else hit on the much more practical reason for the popularity of the Android platform with the younger age groups... Price.



    Let's face it, a LOT of parent are pretty hard pressed to shell out the extra money for an iPhone for junior. Especially if you have a couple of them running around. Couple that with the fact that the iPhone service plans are significantly more expensive than you could find with say an Android phone on Sprint. You do the math... If you have a pair of teenagers at home you can buy them both a new Android phone for the price of a single iPhone, and then you can probably save another $50+ per month on the service plan. When you factor in cheerleading, karate, tutoring, the bump in your car insurance rates once they start driving, saving several hundred a year on the cell phone bill is a big incentive to NOT buying them iPhones.



    The other aspect to this is that those who's parents let them choose what to do with their allowances... Junior can blow ALL his monthly stipend on his iPhone or he can have an extra $40 per month by shopping around for a cheaper alternative. The college crowd is pretty much the same. iPhone or an extra $40 or so per month for beer?



    Price is the determining factor here. My guess is that a significant portion of these people using Androids would have iPhones if there was no difference in price.





    sprint has unlimited data, but with family plans it's more expensive than AT&T. i'm on a 4 line plan and always look t switch but the price is always the same.



    the reason android is popular is that decent phones like the mytouch 4g or htc inspire can be had for $50 or less. and HTC phones withstand more damage. i've dropped mine on concrete with no protection and came away with a small scuff on the back



    dropped my ipad 2 while in a case and shattered the screen. good thing apple replaces it for free on a case by case basis



    iphone + case + activation is $300 for low end one. and apple is always changing the design just a little so you can't share cases between generations
  • Reply 87 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thompr View Post




    The SEC filings show Apple's healthy overall margins, but they don't break them down by product or by discount. So the bottom line is, you don't really know.



    Thompson



    Uh... no, one can make a reasonably fine-grained guess, based on data about component costs (i.e., costs of goods sold), and allocation of SGA dollars. Even if one were to assume the a pretty aggressive SGA allocation, the margins come out pretty darn good on the iPad.
  • Reply 88 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    Let me get this straight. Apple has not announced the existence of "iPhone 5" or ever acknowledged that is the chosen name of the next version of iPhone, so ChangeWave calls it "iPhone 5" and does a survey on it? Next survey: how many people want to buy a "BMW X8"? We just made the name up, but hey, valid survey question, right?



    Best post of the thread!
  • Reply 89 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    Let me get this straight. Apple has not announced the existence of "iPhone 5" or ever acknowledged that is the chosen name of the next version of iPhone, so ChangeWave calls it "iPhone 5" and does a survey on it? Next survey: how many people want to buy a "BMW X8"? We just made the name up, but hey, valid survey question, right?



    I think you're going to have to come up with a better example. Based upon this example I would conclude that this imaginary BMW is a super high end SUV. I would also guess that this would sell for north of 6 figures. These two assumptions alone take your potential market from tens of millions down to tens of thousands, and that's being generous. Furthermore, I would guess that the "install base" of the BMW X series of vehicles is probably in the several tens of thousands range, or maybe even 100K+ but certainly quite short of the millions of iPhones. This relatively limited "install base" means that a significantly smaller number of people have any experience with the potential product.



    Provide an example of a product that is less then the annual salary of most Americans. Provide an example of an incremental upgrade to a product that most people are familiar with. This will get you a better result.



    Ask this question of a BMW owners group and see what kind of response you get. I'm sure you'll get some enthusiastic response.
  • Reply 90 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    You're terrible at lying. Unless by "3GS" you mean "some other phone that isn't an iPhone at all".



    I never knew you can do that? And I'm not talking about hacking it or anything.. Does that mean I can take out a SIM card from another ATT phone and put it into my original iPhone and make it work?
  • Reply 91 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fazworld View Post


    I never knew you can do that? And I'm not talking about hacking it or anything.. Does that mean I can take out a SIM card from another ATT phone and put it into my original iPhone and make it work?



    I don't see why not. The original iPhone's the only one that you don't have to have a forced data plan, too, so yeah, it'll work fine and AT&T won't give a crap. You can use whatever plan you have now.
  • Reply 92 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fazworld View Post


    you can't just take out the sim card and put it into another phone. in fact, the 3GS doesn't have a removable sim card.



    What kind of rip off 3GS are you using?
  • Reply 93 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fazworld View Post


    I never knew you can do that? And I'm not talking about hacking it or anything.. Does that mean I can take out a SIM card from another ATT phone and put it into my original iPhone and make it work?



    Yes, as long as it is an ATT phone. When my wifes iphone broke, I popped her sim out and put it in mine since she was expecting a call. Worked fine. I've never gone from iphone to non-iphone, but i can't remember seeing that the sim cards were different.
  • Reply 94 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    I don't see why not. The original iPhone's the only one that you don't have to have a forced data plan, too, so yeah, it'll work fine and AT&T won't give a crap. You can use whatever plan you have now.



    If you put that into a 3G iphone, would you just stay on Edge or wifi?
  • Reply 95 of 108
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    https://twitter.com/brentgrinna/stat...89242800697344



    Via Asymco yesterday. 70% if devices in Harvard network iOS, about 20% Android.





    so much for the HTC guy.
  • Reply 96 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by airnerd View Post


    If you put that into a 3G iphone, would you just stay on Edge or wifi?



    Hmm? If you put any SIM in a phone, you can use the capabilities of the phone to its fullest. The hardware capabilities of the phone are based on the phone, not the plan you're on or the SIM you use.



    You'll just be charged out the ear if you're not paying for a data plan (and in the case of the iPhone, if you put a SIM from a different phone into an iPhone and try to use it, AT&T will add a data plan to your current plan and there's nothing you can do about it).
  • Reply 97 of 108
    thomprthompr Posts: 1,521member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    I don't see why not. The original iPhone's the only one that you don't have to have a forced data plan, too, so yeah, it'll work fine and AT&T won't give a crap. You can use whatever plan you have now.



    I did exactly that. I bought my daughter a cheap-o AT&T phone without a data plan, and I put that card in my old iPhone 3G that I had handed down to her a year prior (for her use as an "iPod Touch").



    Unfortunately, her iPhone pulled a little bit of data that first month (just 20 KBs or so) even though I had turned off "Data" in the Settings. So we got hit with the full cost of the AT&T data plan that we never agreed to in the first place. (We did, after all, apparently use some data!) Since that time, I also turned off "Location Services" because there was some indication that the small amount of data the iPhone used was related to the few times that we used "Find My iPhone" to locate her handset. I'm anxious to see how that will turn out, or whether AT&T feels they can ding me with the cost of a data plan I don't use just because I stick my SIM in an iPhone and make phone calls (or send texts) with it.



    Thompson
  • Reply 98 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thompr View Post


    I did exactly that. I bought my daughter a cheap-o AT&T phone without a data plan, and I put that card in my old iPhone 3G that I had handed down to her a year prior (for her use as an "iPod Touch").



    Unfortunately, her iPhone pulled a little bit of data that first month (just 20 KBs or so) even though I had turned off "Data" in the Settings. So we got hit with the full cost of the AT&T data plan that we never agreed to in the first place. (We did, after all, apparently use some data!) Since that time, I also turned off "Location Services" because there was some indication that the small amount of data the iPhone used was related to the few times that we used "Find My iPhone" to locate her handset. I'm anxious to see how that will turn out, or whether AT&T feels they can ding me with the cost of a data plan I don't use just because I stick my SIM in an iPhone and make phone calls (or send texts) with it.



    Thompson



    You can tell the telecom to 'block data to the device'. Just go to your local store and say, "I want to block all data to and from this device". They have to comply.
  • Reply 99 of 108
    thomprthompr Posts: 1,521member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    You can tell the telecom to 'block data to the device'. Just go to your local store and say, "I want to block all data to and from this device". They have to comply.



    I'll give it a try. (Hopefully it won't break anything required for proper function of the iPhone.)



    The last time I was in a local AT&T store, I was told that their policy is if you stick your SIM card into an iPhone they will charge you for the data plan no matter what. That seems illegal to me. I should be able to stick that SIM into whatever I want (ouch!) as long as I use it per the agreed plan.



    Thompson
  • Reply 100 of 108
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thompr View Post


    The last time I was in a local AT&T store, I was told that their policy is if you stick your SIM card into an iPhone they will charge you for the data plan no matter what.



    Yes, that's true for everything but the first-gen.



    Quote:

    That seems illegal to me.



    Same here, but no one has ever contested it, so they get away with it.
Sign In or Register to comment.