Apple sued over microprocessor patents; Mass. to investigate iTunes fraud

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    Tell you what: you make those phone calls and post the result on the forums. Deal?



    Ummm... yeeeaahh.... the news website *reader* should do the journalistic research, but the news *website* shouldn't?



    Wow, that's just.....idiotic.
  • Reply 22 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    For an oft-quoted blog, AI does precious little research into any of the featured stories.



    Instead of rephrasing entire articles by others, is there any chance any of the writers here could actually make a phone call to get some original interviews? That would be a real shocker.



    The entire News Industry does very little investigation and draws from AP/Reuters/UPI.
  • Reply 23 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    There's some additional detail on VIA and what they may be claiming over at Gigaom.



    http://gigaom.com/apple/apples-a4-an...n-new-lawsuit/



    There was no new information. It was just a repackage from other sites.



    Perhaps they could actually link to the court filing?
  • Reply 24 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    Yup. iTunes has simply become the new gas station in the credit card fraud game. It used to be that someone with your stolen credit card number would first go to a pay-at-the-pump gas station to verify the card was still working (no face-to-face with a casher, no one to confiscate your card if it's rejected, no drawing attention to yourself). Then if buying a couple bucks of gas was successful, they'd go make a bigger purchase. Next time they want to use the card, again first go to the gas station to make sure it hasn't been reported as stolen yet. This was a known pattern credit card companies started to watch for to detect fraud.



    Now the thieves are simply using iTunes instead of going to the gas station. How is Apple at fault for this? Apple doesn't know if the person is then making purchases elsewhere. There's no pattern of behavior for Apple to watch for. The credit card companies and the consumer themselves are the only ones in a position to see this happening.





    yep, very true, and happen to the wife card and after the gas station purchase the CC company shut our card off, which piss the wife off since she was traveling at that time. Thieves just found a new way to check if the card number is valid anymore and apple is the target. The only question is if a number of different itune accounts use the same number within a short period of time. Not sure if Apple does a cross check to see if another account is using the same CC number. That could be the only way apple could address this issue since most CC # which are stolen are sold many times over especially when they work.
  • Reply 25 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    Yup. iTunes has simply become the new gas station in the credit card fraud game.... There's no pattern of behavior for Apple to watch for. The credit card companies and the consumer themselves are the only ones in a position to see this happening.



    This. Reading the original story includes this gem: "Coakley said her office was pursuing a "common sense" approach to enforcement and notification."



    Martha, don't let your office have all the fun! How 'bout you pursue some of that "common sense" for yourself?
  • Reply 26 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    There's some additional detail on VIA and what they may be claiming over at Gigaom.



    http://gigaom.com/apple/apples-a4-an...n-new-lawsuit/



    That website was right that X86 and ARM processors used different technologies all together, but claim that it could be low power change that apple deployed and VIA may have used in the X83 chips, as everyone know X86 Intel technologies are power hogs that is also why apple chose not to use the Intel parts on the iProducts.
  • Reply 27 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jane Boxyroom View Post


    The attorney general of Massachusetts is becoming unreasonable with the incident of her lost credit card. This incident must be reported to the credit company at once. If she will investigate the fraud happening in Apple, it must be purely professional and not personal.



    Perhaps she should looking into why her bank cleared use of the card by someone else. Because if they cleared it as okay, how is Apple supposed to know she didn't give the card to someone else to use
  • Reply 28 of 40
    Chen Wen-Chi (CEO of VIA) is married to Cher Wang the Chairperson of HTC. Apple is HTCs biggest competitor. Hmmmm
  • Reply 29 of 40
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 30 of 40
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 31 of 40
    We just had our cards stolen. After they had success at gas stations, they tried the Sony store, the apple store (not iTunes), lenova, a jeweler in RI. They got my wife's visa and am exp cards. Am exp cards have different numbers, but somehow they got my number as well (probably from receipts in the car with the last 4 numbers). I got an email from am exp querying the lenova purchase; they said they had also flagged the Sony and apple store charges (these are still listed as pending, with a $1 charge). The jeweler from RI actually called me to check.



    They are trying to get stuff they can easily fence.



    Is the AG confusing the apple web store with iTunes?
  • Reply 32 of 40
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,860member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post


    Sound like the AG is using his power to for personal gain here. sounds like conflict of interest.



    Attorney generals, and prosecutors are some of the least responsible of all government officials. They regularly bring legal action to promote themselves to move up the political ladder. Personal gain seems to be the only reason some of these people are even in the positions they are in.
  • Reply 33 of 40
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,860member
    Why roll in a story about a stupid attorney general with one about a patent case? The Via story could have been developed into something more interesting. For example discussion of the patents involved.



    I have to agree with others this article is to much regurgitation and to little effort.
  • Reply 34 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post


    I, through my daughter, had two types of fraud occur within days of each other. Apple is currently investigating.



    1) some one purchased a free game using her account. She got an email informing her a different device than her computers had been used for this transaction, but the Apple process didn't allow the transaction to be stopped, nor did it identify what device was used. Gets more interesting, in that the game that was purchased was actually attributed to a third person who did dispute the (non) charge.



    2) the $100 back to school gift card she received from Apple, had previously been used by someone else. Apple initially scolded my daughter for buying a gift card from a sleazy discount broker, and suggested that she take the matter up with the credit card company to dispute the charge.



    When I finally got involved, i suggested to Apple that these issues might reflect an inside job.



    \\ Having five children, the youngest now a teen, I would suggest that the more likely culprit is a friend? getting her password and the gift card details at the same time. As with stolen CC mentioned here, the free game is a test, the gift card the real fraud. Have her think about when she showed ppl the gift card, every kids phone has a camera,
  • Reply 35 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Yet another non-issue for Apple. If it is the ARM processor, Apple has a license to use it. If the license is invalid, Apple probably has recourse against ARM. If it was a different processor, then the processor manufacturer would likely indemnify Apple.



    That is, unless Apple's attorneys are idiots - and we know that not to be the case.



    Your expert legal opinion? Surely Via's attorneys have thought of that?







    Quote:

    Idiot. He lost his credit card. It has been known for years that if you lose your credit card, someone can use it. If he reported the theft to the credit card company, he's already protected.



    Perhaps you're not aware, but the issue of fraudulent iTunes transactions with little response from Apple has been going on for well over a year.
  • Reply 36 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post


    Perhaps you're not aware, but the issue of fraudulent iTunes transactions with little response from Apple has been going on for well over a year.



    Could it be that her statement regarding the office investigating the matter could mean a larger look at the problem as a whole and what can be done to increase security of personal information for all and not just an investigation of her particular case?



    It seems to me that a Fraudulent iTunes purchase isn't quite accurate here. Yes iTunes fraud if gift card numbers are hacked or an iTunes account is hacked - but this is a case of Fraudulent (or the very least unauthorized) use of a credit card which just so happened to be conducted through the iTunes store. as mentioned it could have happened anywhere. and as for Dell raising an alarm but Apple not - the amount of the transaction likely was a factor. Then again - if someone used my credit card number to create a new account from a device which has never been authorized before then a check might be nice. Not that I am suggesting Apple should have no concern and do no checking but can you imagine the nuisance it would be if you got a phone call or email to verify every 99 cents you spend?



    I did get a call once from a credit card company to verify that I had made a purchase. In contrast my sister-in-law did NOT get a call when someone used her credit card to buy plane tickets and ski rentals despite those purchases putting the card well over its limit.
  • Reply 37 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post


    Could it be that her statement regarding the office investigating the matter could mean a larger look at the problem as a whole and what can be done to increase security of personal information for all and not just an investigation of her particular case?



    It seems to me that a Fraudulent iTunes purchase isn't quite accurate here. Yes iTunes fraud if gift card numbers are hacked or an iTunes account is hacked - but this is a case of Fraudulent (or the very least unauthorized) use of a credit card which just so happened to be conducted through the iTunes store. as mentioned it could have happened anywhere. and as for Dell raising an alarm but Apple not - the amount of the transaction likely was a factor. Then again - if someone used my credit card number to create a new account from a device which has never been authorized before then a check might be nice. Not that I am suggesting Apple should have no concern and do no checking but can you imagine the nuisance it would be if you got a phone call or email to verify every 99 cents you spend?



    I did get a call once from a credit card company to verify that I had made a purchase. In contrast my sister-in-law did NOT get a call when someone used her credit card to buy plane tickets and ski rentals despite those purchases putting the card well over its limit.







    I would suggest your sister-in-law change CC companies then, we get calls from time to time on our own transactions especially when they are outside out buying habits. There are times the wife and I are both traveling at the same time and use the CC at about the same time in two locations and we get a call to make sure they are ours. Some CC companies do this to make sure it is you verse fraud transaction.
  • Reply 38 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    Tell you what: you make those phone calls and post the result on the forums. Deal?



    Why should I make those calls? Am I running my own rumor/news web site?



    It would do wonders for AI's credibility and newsworthiness and I'm sure I wouldn't be the only one who notices.
  • Reply 39 of 40
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post


    The entire News Industry does very little investigation and draws from AP/Reuters/UPI.



    But they also PAY for those news services. AI gets a free ride by merely switching around a sentence here and there and calling it their own. I think they can do better. Otherwise, they should merely provide the links and stop the spin and interpretation on these stories. We've seen many times stories here that were "repackaged" and consequently loaded with errors.
  • Reply 40 of 40
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,904member
    9to5Mac has an article up today that questions whether Apple has made a mistake in going after HTC. Interesting piece. I knew there was a relationship between Via and HTC, but didn't know they were both owned by the same parent company.



    http://9to5mac.com/2011/09/26/formos...en/#more-94576



    http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20110926PD208.html
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