Steve Jobs was ?annoyed and depressed? over initial reaction to iPad launch

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  • Reply 221 of 222
    Considering the ups & downs that Jobs had seen since 1985, I'm a little surprised that he let comments from the peanut gallery get him down. But anyway, I wonder if there is anything in the book about his feelings on the cliché that every half-baked computer site began using after the iPad's launch and initial success: "iPad Killer". That silly term has now taken on a life of its own, even though the best to come down the pike haven't put much more than a dent in the iPad's armor, much less killed it. But these days, I guess hyperbole is the way to get page views... and votes.
  • Reply 222 of 222
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


    That is not what Apple means in its marketing campaigns when they say "the rest of us" and "think different." The rest of us referred to people who didn't want to become computer savvy to use a computer. They just wanted to use a computer, not get a job in IT.



    Think different is an expression of Apple's (and Steve Jobs's) core values. The ads were Apple saying to the world, "This is what we are about. This is what we believe. The people who have the courage to think differently are the ones who change the world."



    You might "think different" from the masses, but you aren't going to change the world like Gandhi or Einstein or Edison (feel free to prove me wrong with a contribution to humanity or two).



    News flash: Apple gave up on geeks when Steve Jobs slapped a plastic case and keyboard on Woz's hobbyist motherboard in 1977 and called it the Apple II. That, and EVERYTHING THAT FOLLOWED was mass market. The only niche, geek product they ever made was the Apple I.



    Think Different was simply a catchy dig playing off the internal IBM motto THINK. It was used in the dark days after Steve came back with Next as a means of separating Apple users as being more intuitive and individualistic. Those were the days the media said the IBM PC had simply won, even though IBM was no longer the biggest supplier of PCs.
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