Apple's charitable matching program raises $2.6M for nonprofits

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
The combined efforts of both Apple and its employees have resulted in more than $2.6 million being donated to nonprofit organizations since a corporate matching program began in mid-September.



AppleInsider has learned that Apple has announced to its employees that the company has matched more than $1.3 million in donations in its program so far. Combined with the $1.3 million in personal contributions initially donated by employees, it brings the total sum of the "Apple Matching Gifts Program" to more than $2.6 million in less than two months.



The $1.3 million matched so far is being used by Apple to internally promote the program and solicit more donations. An image touting the success of the program links employees to a page that provides an overview of the matching program.



The charitable matching program was announced by Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook in an e-mail to employees in September. The program, through which money donated to a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization is matched dollar-for-dollar by Apple, kicked off on Sept. 15.



Should employees choose to take advantage of the program, they can donate up to $10,000 to a nonprofit of their choice every year, and that money will be matched by Apple. The program is currently available to full-time employees of Apple in America, but will expand to more countries in time.







"We are all really inspired by the generosity of our co-workers who give back to the community and this program is going to help that individual giving go even farther," Cook wrote to employees in September. He continued: "Thank you all for working so hard to make a difference, both here and in the lives of others. I am incredibly proud to be part of this team."



Separately, a person familiar with Apple's corporate operations also revealed that the company is hoping to boost recruiting for its Silicon Engineering Group by offering a $5,000 bonus for employee referrals. A current Apple employee who refers someone for a job by Nov. 12 can receive the bonus if the person they recommend is eventually hired.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 30
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    The title of the article is a bit misleading since the Apple matching program only raised $1.3 million. The other $1.3 million was donated without any involvement of Apple.
  • Reply 2 of 30
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    The title of the article is a bit misleading since the Apple matching program only raised $1.3 million. The other $1.3 million was donated without any involvement of Apple.



    Not at all. The PROGRAM raised $2.6 M - $1.3 M from Apple and $1.3 M from the employees.



    Granted, some of the employee contribution would probably have occurred without Apple's program, but it doesn't change the fact that $2.6 M was contributed through this program.
  • Reply 3 of 30
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Not at all. The PROGRAM raised $2.6 M - $1.3 M from Apple and $1.3 M from the employees.



    Granted, some of the employee contribution would probably have occurred without Apple's program, but it doesn't change the fact that $2.6 M was contributed through this program.



    I disagree, but you can believe what you want.
  • Reply 4 of 30
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.



    And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.
  • Reply 5 of 30
    malaxmalax Posts: 1,598member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    I disagree, but you can believe what you want.



    Nothing misleading about the article at all. Nothing suggests that Apple coughed up the full $2.6M. And obviously some of the employees' $1.3M would have happened anyway. So what? The article is just an update on the program and gives us a sense of how significant it is. I'd characterize it as modestly to moderately successful given the size of Apple, but it's only been in place for a few weeks so that's impressive.
  • Reply 6 of 30
    malaxmalax Posts: 1,598member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.



    And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.



    You're kidding I hope. Right?



    Everything that Jobs did was "part of the culture" at Apple and therefore any changes are the beginning of the end? That's your thesis?



    There's no chance that employees will feel proud to work at a company that is supportive of their charitable giving and therefore will be more loyal and productive? No chance at all, because Jobs didn't believe it?
  • Reply 7 of 30
    ciacia Posts: 60member
    Quote:

    The $1.3 million matched so far is being used by Apple to internally promote the program and solicit more donations. An image touting the success of the program links employees to a page that provides an overview of the matching program.



    So, are they using the money to promote the program, or have they actually matched the donations to non-profits? The way this is written it sounds like they are keeping the match money, and just spending it on promotional material.
  • Reply 8 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.



    And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.



    In case you didn't read SJ's biography or been up to date on the blogosphere lately, SJ specifically asked the staff at Apple to NOT ask what Steve would. He wanted them to follow their own voice while remaining true to the goal of creating the best products in the world. That's exactly what they're doing.



    So what's your problem.
  • Reply 9 of 30
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    I disagree, but you can believe what you want.



    You're in the wrong here. The amount is clearly referring to the program Apple started, not Apple's specific donation to the program. If the title said "Apple's raised $2.6M for its charitable matching program" then I would agree with you. The location of the preposition 'for' changes the context.
  • Reply 10 of 30
    malaxmalax Posts: 1,598member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CIA View Post


    So, are they using the money to promote the program, or have they actually matched the donations to non-profits? The way this is written it sounds like they are keeping the match money, and just spending it on promotional material.



    I assume it's just a mix-up in how that's being reported. It's pretty clear that Apple promised to match dollar-for-dollars donations to specific not-for-profits.
  • Reply 11 of 30
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by malax View Post


    Nothing misleading about the article at all. Nothing suggests that Apple coughed up the full $2.6M.



    Which is exactly my point. The title is a spin job.



    For the title to be correct Apple would have to design a charitable program where by employees would have the contributions deducted from their pay check and they would select from a list of charitable organizations. Then Apple would match it and send the funds to the organization. That would be a program that could claim that it raised 2.6 million. But that is not how the actual program works.



    If you look at the Apple page they don't mention 2.6 million, they say they matched 1.3 million which is what the title of this article should read in my opinion.
  • Reply 12 of 30
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,589member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.



    And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.



    Dumb post of the week.
  • Reply 13 of 30
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member
    deleted
  • Reply 14 of 30
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,360member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    If you look at the Apple page they don't mention 2.6 million, they say they matched 1.3 million which is what the title of this article should read in my opinion.



    I disagree. An employer matching the donations provides a strong incentive for the employees to contribute in the first place, and had Apple not matched these donations, then it is reasonable to assume that 1.3 million would never have been contributed by the employees. It is because of Apple's donation matching that the total figure turned out to be 2.6 million.
  • Reply 15 of 30
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    If you look at the Apple page they don't mention 2.6 million, they say they matched 1.3 million which is what the title of this article should read in my opinion.



    They matched. They.. as in Apple matched. That's correct, but so is the title that stated that the program raised x amount. The program was created by Apple but is not Apple. There is a very clear and distinct line that leads to no ambiguity as written, although I do agree that it could be made more clear as not everyone reads internet webpages as intently as they might a textbook.
  • Reply 16 of 30
    jd_in_sbjd_in_sb Posts: 1,482member
    Apparently no story is immune to negative feedback, not even an article about Apple giving money to charities.
  • Reply 17 of 30
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    They matched. They.. as in Apple matched. That's correct, but so is the title that stated that the program raised x amount. The program was created by Apple but is not Apple. There is a very clear and distinct line that leads to no ambiguity as written, although I do agree that it could be made more clear as not everyone reads internet webpages as intently as they might a textbook.



    Maybe it should read Apple's matching program helps raise 2.6 million...
  • Reply 18 of 30
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Maybe it should read Apple's matching program helps raise 2.6 million...



    I agree 'helps' is a good modifier to further move away form ambiguity, but I think your original issue would still exist even if somewhat diminished.
  • Reply 19 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.



    And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.



    Apple had an employee charitable matching program up into the 1990s, was discontinued as a cost saving measure. I don't know if it started on Steve's watch or after.
  • Reply 20 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    Steve Jobs did NOT approve of charitable activities at Apple. The creation of this program by Tim Cook is a first step in the destruction of the culture Steve created.



    And since that culture is key to creation of the products we all know and love, and since those products are far more valuable to the world than a few million in donations here and there, this is both short sighted by Tim and bad for the world as a whole.



    WOW that's total bull-crap!



    I doubt SJ was against charitable donations with other people's money. He might not have been into giving away his money, but I don't believe that extended to the culture and generosity of Apple employees.
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