Google's Android Market estimated to earn just 7% of what Apple's App Store makes

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  • Reply 41 of 80
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,321member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Snowdog65 View Post


    The big difference is that a lot more Android users have decided to make free apps out of paid apps, since you can pirate them without a jailbreak.



    http://www.intomobile.com/2011/09/08...em-hurts-devs/



    Have they? Even the article you linked indicates the data claiming that may be flawed. FWIW I don't personally know anyone who's stolen apps from either platform. With average app prices well under $3, what would be the incentive?



    Personally I would think it's just as likely for iPhone owners to use pirated apps as Android users if that's really a common problem (which I doubt). With an estimated 10% of iPhones jailbroken, there's app options for them other than the official AppStore.
  • Reply 42 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Have they? Even the article you linked indicates the data claiming that may be flawed. FWIW I don't personally know anyone who's stolen apps from either platform. With average app prices well under $3, what would be the incentive?



    Personally I would think it's just as likely for iPhone owners to use pirated apps as Android users if that's really a common problem (which I doubt). With an estimated 10% of iPhones jailbroken, there's app options for them other than the official AppStore.



    Geez Gator.... just Google: android apps for free... and you can even watch multiple how-to videos on YouTube how to hack the dang things!



    I mean seriously: how ironic is THAT?!?!
  • Reply 43 of 80
    Most of the apps on Android are free anywho (yes, the same apps avalible on iOS). Kind of a moot point unless you devleop!
  • Reply 44 of 80
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,321member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post


    Geez Gator.... just Google: android apps for free... and you can even watch multiple how-to videos on YouTube how to hack the dang things!



    I mean seriously: how ironic is THAT?!?!



    Of course you can steal an app, but do a significant number of owners really do? I remember a discussion from a few weeks ago concerning jailbreaking, and one of the more common statements was that people jailbreak mostly to steal apps. The ones jailbreaking their devices claimed foul, saying that it wasn't a real problem and they don't do it to avoid paying for apps.



    So in effect, because it can be done does that mean it is being done on a regular basis? Is app theft a real issue that has to be dealt with sooner rather than later? As I mentioned earlier, what's the incentive for an Android (or Apple) user to go out of his/her way to find a free and perhaps malware-seeded version of an official app store application when the legit version is only a couple of bucks?
  • Reply 45 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by linkgx1 View Post


    Most of the apps on Android are free anywho (yes, the same apps avalible on iOS). Kind of a moot point unless you devleop!



    They are free because piracy is so rampant it is pointless to try and sell them on Android.



    Angry birds was available for sale on iOS, but only ad supported on Android.
  • Reply 46 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Snowdog65 View Post


    They are free because piracy is so rampant it is pointless to try and sell them on Android.



    Angry birds was available for sale on iOS, but only ad supported on Android.



    I think the openess is what kills it for developers. There isn't any kind of DRM/verifacation system . I haven't really pirated, but Amazon is killing it. I can just wait for an app to become free for the day and PAPOW!
  • Reply 47 of 80
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,734member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post


    Will developers follow market share or revenue?



    My bet is revenue. If MS can get developers making slightly more money than Android developers, Android development could simply stop.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    By that reasoning Blackberry development should have simply stopped. Yet it hasn't.



    A certain percentage of developers will be dedicated to a particular platform for whatever reason. They probably would tend to have the same attitude as the fanboys of a platform and choose to develop mainly for it. Just proposing a rationale.
  • Reply 48 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Snowdog65 View Post


    Apparently you never heard that Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich has been released.

    http://articles.businessinsider.com/...ch-source-code



    I believe you will find it's is on a much lower percentage of phones than iOS 5.



    Agreed. The one major thing no one is accounting for are how many phones are actually eligible for any sort of upgrade. Adoption is based on eligibility of a handset and those who upgrade. Since a fraction of the android phones are eligible for upgrade or even released with the latest OS the percentage should be higher. Take the 200 million units in circulation and divide by those on the current version and your looking at grim numbers. Here is a great graphical break down of the last 18 phones on the link below.



    http://theunderstatement.com/post/11...ory-of-support



    So even if you have a high adoption rate, you have to take account the millions of phones that are even eligible. 100% adoption on 5% of the phones in the market nothing compared to the rate of phones on 1-2 year old versions. This is why there are major fragmentation issues. Google is not responsible for updates to the customer. The Carrier and the handset manufacturer are responsible for new licensing ect. and it is not in their best interest to support older phones to push out updates due to cost and lack of generating revenue off an update. Push people to the newest handset. Period.



    Apple changed the carrier manufacturer relationship and connect direct to the consumer allowing for longer support in the product life cycle. Fragmentation will not change in android since their are two many variables with two many hands in the cookie jar.
  • Reply 49 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by captbilly View Post


    I realize that this is the AppleInsider, so we all have a special interest in Apple, but what sort of answer would one expect when speaking to developers at an Apple developers conference? The bottom line is that Android is growing substantially faster than IOS and no analyst thinks that is going to stop in the forseable future. It is true that developers have found ways to make money even on OSX, in spite of OSXs low single digit market share (Windows has well over 90%). I am sure that there will be ways for IOS developers to make money even when IOS has dropped to single digit market share, but the opportunities will be limited.



    All this spewing about fragmentation, and many devices using old version of Android, simply misses the point, Android is the OS to beat, not IOS. I really liked all my IOS devices (phones and pods) but the best Android devices are now as good or better than IOS devices, and I am apparently not the only consumer to notice this. It is certainly not the media that is pushing Android either. For every positive comment about Android, I see on TV, there are 20 about the Iphone or Ipad, but somehow Android surges ahead anyway. Apple simply cannot compete with all the Android devices with a couple of phones and pads. We have reached the point where the two biggest Android phone makers now each sell more phones than Apple, and the way things are going there will soon be a couple more Android makers who sell more phones than Apple



    So what is my point?, if Apple doesn't make a dramatic change to their marketing model IOS will either disappear or become a niche product. What I am afraid of is that users will simply not be willing to run Android on most of their devices while running IOS on a selct few. Somewhat like the VHS vs Beta or HDDVd vs. Bluray, or even Windows vs. OSX, is going





    Let's make sure you are quoting "facts" correctly.



    1. You said: " The bottom line is that Android is growing substantially faster than IOS and no analyst thinks that is going to stop in the forseable future."

    FACT: Android OS marketshare on "smartphone" hardware is growing faster than Apple's iOS on iPhones. However, profitability for the platform is all Apple between the two, and Apple continues to grow profitability. While Apple monitors marketshare to ensure they are maintaining a reasonable segment and growth, they are not going to join the race to the bottom with the rest of the handset makers. Further several analysts have suggested that Android may well peak in the next year or two (not that I think their analysis is worth a crap) so you are incorrect there as well.



    2. You said: "...if Apple doesn't make a dramatic change to their marketing model IOS will either disappear or become a niche product."

    FACT: Apple offers the iPhone 3GS for free/$.99*, it offers the previous generation iPhone 4 for 99$US* as well as the entire lineup of iPhone 4S (16/32/64GB)for the standard 199$US/299$US/399$US*. What more do they need to do to change their marketing model to suit the market? Pundits like yourself have proclaimed the death of iOS since it's inception, especially viewed against the build-out of the Android OS (which has driven uptake primarily from Windows Mobile, RIM and the feature phone segment - not significantly from the iOS population. With the lion's share of the profits, a wide pricing model - just what kind of drastic changes do you suggest for this?



    Inquiring minds want to know.....



    *with 2 year contract
  • Reply 50 of 80
    Does this comparison include money from ads or just purchases? If it's the latter, that's leaving out a big part of the equation.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Actually a higher percentage of Android phones are on the latest version compared to iPhone owners., 40% for iOS and 44% for Android.



    The android number in that link is based on visits to the android market in the last 14 days. I'm skeptical how reliable that number is since the people most likely to leave their phone with an out of date OS are also the ones most likely to be visiting the market little if at all.



    And especially considering how many brand new android phones don't ship with the current OS if you buy them today, much less try to upgrade them.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    2. You said: "...if Apple doesn't make a dramatic change to their marketing model IOS will either disappear or become a niche product."

    FACT: Apple offers the iPhone 3GS for free/$.99*, it offers the previous generation iPhone 4 for 99$US* as well as the entire lineup of iPhone 4S (16/32/64GB)for the standard 199$US/299$US/399$US*. What more do they need to do to change their marketing model to suit the market? Pundits like yourself have proclaimed the death of iOS since it's inception, especially viewed against the build-out of the Android OS (which has driven uptake primarily from Windows Mobile, RIM and the feature phone segment - not significantly from the iOS population. With the lion's share of the profits, a wide pricing model - just what kind of drastic changes do you suggest for this?



    The reason I just got an android phone instead of iPhone is because it's available with a much much cheaper monthly plan. iPhone isn't going to fail, but market share isn't going to go back up significantly until it's available on all US carriers. Not to mention that the off contract pricing is steep, particularly looking at the low end - the 3GS for $350 is highway robbery compared to android options in that price range (or far less). It's great that Apple can fetch that price but I don't think it's sustainable as the competition improves their product.
  • Reply 51 of 80
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,321member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mastawee View Post


    Agreed. The one major thing no one is accounting for are how many phones are actually eligible for any sort of upgrade. Adoption is based on eligibility of a handset and those who upgrade. Since a fraction of the android phones are eligible for upgrade or even released with the latest OS the percentage should be higher. Take the 200 million units in circulation and divide by those on the current version and your looking at grim numbers. Here is a great graphical break down of the last 18 phones on the link below.

    So even if you have a high adoption rate, you have to take account the millions of phones that are even eligible. 100% adoption on 5% of the phones in the market nothing compared to the rate of phones on 1-2 year old versions. This is why there are major fragmentation issues. Google is not responsible for updates to the customer. The Carrier and the handset manufacturer are responsible for new licensing ect. and it is not in their best interest to support older phones to push out updates due to cost and lack of generating revenue off an update. Push people to the newest handset. Period. . .



    Assume 200 million Android phones, with 44% of them on the latest available version, and another 41% one version behind that. In essence 85% of all active Android smartphones on what would be considered a current OS version as far as most developer's would be concerned. That leaves only 30 million devices on "old" OS versions, and just 2.5 percent, around 5 million Android phones, on truly handicapped 1.x versions of the OS. That's certainly not "grim numbers" is it?



    The update road for the newer Android phones isn't following the same meandering and dead-end paths from 09 and early 2010. Google's pressure on the OEM's to be more responsive to existing handset OS upgrades appears to he working going by the early announcements of handsets that will be updated to ICS by the first quarter.
  • Reply 52 of 80
    The great thing about iOS devices (or Macs in general for that matter) is that the price difference between them and the competition is proportionally low compared to other "luxury" goods. In other words, most of us can't afford the high-end cars and homes that the stars, celebs, and filthy rich own, but you and I can use the best phone and tablet--the same ones George Clooney, Paris Hiltion, and the Sultan of Dubai use. There just aren't any better ones to be had at any price.
  • Reply 53 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Assume 200 million Android phones, with 44% of them on the latest available version, and another 41% one version behind that. In essence 85% of all active Android smartphones on what would be considered a current OS version as far as most developer's would be concerned. That leaves only 30 million devices on "old" OS versions, and just 2.5 percent, around 5 million Android phones, on truly handicapped 1.x versions of the OS. That's certainly not "grim numbers" is it?



    The update road for the newer Android phones isn't not the same meandering and dead-end paths from 09 and early 2010. Google's pressure on the OEM's to be more responsive to existing handset OS upgrades appears to he working going by the early announcements of handsets that will be updated to ICS by the first quarter.



    I like this guy.
  • Reply 54 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


    The great thing about iOS devices (or Macs in general for that matter) is that the price difference between them and the competition is proportionally low compared to other "luxury" goods. In other words, most of us can't afford the high-end cars and homes that the stars, celebs, and filthy rich own, but you and I can use the best phone and tablet--the same ones George Clooney, Paris Hiltion, and the Sultan of Dubai use. There just aren't any better ones to be had at any price.



    OMG! I noticed this a while too! I think phones are the only category that can do this (I also noticed on the latest Apprentince season how everyone had a Samsung Epic).



    When you look at it, an iPhone isn't that expensive. Especially when you see most debut phones are that price too. Look atthe price of the Droid RAZR.
  • Reply 55 of 80
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,321member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by linkgx1 View Post


    OMG! I noticed this a while too! I think phones are the only category that can do this (I also noticed on the latest Apprentince season how everyone had a Samsung Epic).



    When you look at it, an iPhone isn't that expensive. Especially when you see most debut phones are that price too. Look atthe price of the Droid RAZR.



    Yup, $800 off-contract. . .



    Except this week, with Amazon aggressively pricing the RAZR at just 1 penny with the obligatory two year contract.
  • Reply 56 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    Yup, $800 off-contract. . .



    Except this week, with Amazon aggressively pricing the RAZR at just 1 penny with the obligatory two year contract.



    I want it, but I just got the 4S. I honestly wish I had two phones. I still love Android though I have the 4S now. Both work very well for me, though they feed differnet needs.
  • Reply 57 of 80
    As a developer for both iOS and Android apps, hate to say it I make MUCH more money on Android than Apple. My iOS app is paid (3.99) and my Android app is Free. But the Android version has ad's. I make a KILLING off the ad impressions. I tried having my app free with ad's on iOS and no one was downloading it. I guess Apple users have that feeling that if an app is free its garbage where as most apps on Android are free and its to be expected. Most Android users do not mind ad's here and there that fund the apps being developed. Plus, Apple doesn't pay me as much as Android does on a app for app basis.
  • Reply 58 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by topgun966 View Post


    As a developer for both iOS and Android apps, hate to say it I make MUCH more money on Android than Apple. My iOS app is paid (3.99) and my Android app is Free. But the Android version has ad's. I make a KILLING off the ad impressions. I tried having my app free with ad's on iOS and no one was downloading it. I guess Apple users have that feeling that if an app is free its garbage where as most apps on Android are free and its to be expected. Most Android users do not mind ad's here and there that fund the apps being developed. Plus, Apple doesn't pay me as much as Android does on a app for app basis.



    Off-topic question, how did you leanr to develop? I've been reading/practicing books without much success.



    I have heard thought that the ad impresisons can make up. It depends on the app. Angry birds makes MILLIONS.
  • Reply 59 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by linkgx1 View Post


    Off-topic question, how did you leanr to develop? I've been reading/practicing books without much success.



    I have heard thought that the ad impresisons can make up. It depends on the app. Angry birds makes MILLIONS.







    There are plenty of books out there that can help. I come from a developer background. I first learned the C programming language when I was very young...early teens. Its all about experience and trial and error. There are plenty of opensource options out there to help you get started.



    Also, I can say it is easier to get started with Android than it is with Apple (sorry apple guys). All you need is 25 bucks to get started to get yourself out there. Also, there are tons of open source tools that can help you.



    Just get your hands dirty and dig in
  • Reply 60 of 80
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by topgun966 View Post


    There are plenty of books out there that can help. I come from a developer background. I first learned the C programming language when I was very young...early teens. Its all about experience and trial and error. There are plenty of opensource options out there to help you get started.



    Also, I can say it is easier to get started with Android than it is with Apple (sorry apple guys). All you need is 25 bucks to get started to get yourself out there. Also, there are tons of open source tools that can help you.



    Just get your hands dirty and dig in



    Yeah, I'll need to practice me. 30-60 MIN a day should be decent, I guess.
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