Apple's iOS finishes 2011 with 52% share of mobile Web browsing

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35
    The stats do seem so meaningless. The graph at the Chrome story shows a different picture of mobile browsing. That graph does look at stats since 2008 but shows Opera still in the lead at the end of the year.



    I went to their very fascinating site and found that if you look Worldwide last year Opera did command the lead every month. Android took the second spot from iPhone in May and kept it until the end of the year.



    Anyway, I'm sure these stats will be disparaged. I take them all with a grain of salt. My stats prof says there are three kinds of liars - liars, damn liars, and statisticians. I had an Android phone until October and finally have an iPhone. I love my iPhone and that's no lie.
  • Reply 22 of 35
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by muppetry View Post


    Are netmarketshare possibly just completely making this stuff up?



    If they are, it would be no different from all the numbers that are trotted out for Android's supposed share.



    Name one audited sales figure for Android handsets.
  • Reply 23 of 35
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post


    My stats prof says there are three kinds of liars - liars, damn liars, and statisticians.



    Did you have Mark Twain as your statistics prof?
  • Reply 24 of 35
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,328member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    If they are, it would be no different from all the numbers that are trotted out for Android's supposed share.



    Name one audited sales figure for Android handsets.



    I wasn't trying to suggest any kind of bias towards Apple - just wondering if they were simply making up stats to sell. They do not appear affiliated to any of the players, but they are doing this to make money.



    However, as pointed out previously, this would be a ridiculously clumsy attempt to concoct data, and more likely there are other factors in the collection or analysis that have produced such significant (but almost certainly non-existent) correlations.
  • Reply 25 of 35
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,495member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post


    My stats prof says there are three kinds of liars - liars, damn liars, and statisticians.



    LOL. And also remember that 87% of statistics are made up.
  • Reply 26 of 35
    conradjoeconradjoe Posts: 1,887member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


    LOL. And also remember that 87% of statistics are made up.



    Quote:

    Windows users often swear at their PC's, whereas Apple users swear by their Macs







    The green text in the above-quoted .sig is NOT allowed on AI. It is a violation of forum rules because it is extremely annoying.
  • Reply 27 of 35
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Napoleon_PhoneApart View Post


    They're busy being charged.









    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    With regard to browsers, did anyone else catch the news that Google Chrome is expected to become the number one browser in 2012, overtaking Internet Explorer after just 4 years?

    http://9to5google.com/2012/01/01/chr...owser-in-2012/



    Anyway, back to the specifics of this article and it's odd results.



    Why always with the projected news instead of hard data? Sure, it looks that way, but Win8 should cause an uptick in IE usage. And IE is quite good now. Will MS allow 3rd-party browsers on their ARM-based WIn8 with the Metro UI or will they run everything through the app store like Apple.



    If we are project anything we should be looking at the longevity of Mozilla. There new 3 year deal with Google is surprisingly high even as Firefox's marketshare and relevance wanes in the shadow of Google's Chrome.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by A Grain of Salt View Post


    It is bizarre considering that Android 2.2 still makes up a fair percent of Android devices. Maybe web browsing on the 2.2 devices isn't very good or it is on lower quality hardware that is not optimised for browsing.



    http://developer.android.com/resourc...-versions.html



    The graph only seems to show OS's that have captured at least 5% of the market. Maybe 2.2 has dropped down below that (or never made it in the first place) and was lumped in with 'Others'. Still that would be like breaking IOS into versions and dumping IOS 3 (I'm sure some still use it) into 'Others' thus reducing the IOS share. As you say, an odd graph.



    I'd think 2.2 would show up, but if all those Android OS-based devices outnumbering iOS-based devices only account for a fraction of the internet usage I guess it's possible that anyone still using 2.2 simply isn't using in the typical manner.
  • Reply 28 of 35
    studentxstudentx Posts: 112member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


    With regard to browsers, did anyone else catch the news that Google Chrome is expected to become the number one browser in 2012, overtaking Internet Explorer after just 4 years?

    http://9to5google.com/2012/01/01/chr...owser-in-2012/



    Anyway, back to the specifics of this article and it's odd results.



    Awesome news for Apple considering Chrome is built on Apple's Webkit, just like Safari.
  • Reply 29 of 35
    studentxstudentx Posts: 112member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rabbit_Coach View Post


    I wonder why in this graph, Android is represented only with Android 2.3 ?



    Android 2.1, 2.2 and 2.2.3 dominant Android's marketshare. ICS and the other baked goods are almost non-existant.



    If I were an Android developer I'd be depressed. Android is the new feature-phone not smart-phone.



  • Reply 30 of 35
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by studentx View Post


    Android 2.1, 2.2 and 2.2.3 dominant Android's marketshare. ICS and the other baked goods are almost non-existant.



    If I were an Android developer I'd be depressed. Android is the new feature-phone not smart-phone.



    Are we going to start this bollocks again now? First it was Symbian isn't a smartphone OS, now it is Android.



    Please explain, what is missing from those versions of Android for them not be considered Smartphone OS's?
  • Reply 31 of 35
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by studentx View Post


    Android 2.1, 2.2 and 2.2.3 dominant Android's marketshare. ICS and the other baked goods are almost non-existant.



    If I were an Android developer I'd be depressed.



    And not particularly rich, either.
  • Reply 32 of 35
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,896member
    ]



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    Are we going to start this bollocks again now? First it was Symbian isn't a smartphone OS, now it is Android.



    Please explain, what is missing from those versions of Android for them not be considered Smartphone OS's?



    I think studentz meant in terms of how the phone is actually used, not theoretical capability. These data would seem to support that view, despite looking off.
  • Reply 33 of 35
    Isn't the iPod Touch a iOS device, no % was given.
  • Reply 34 of 35
    sdbryansdbryan Posts: 324member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EyeNsteinNo View Post


    Isn't the iPod Touch a iOS device, no % was given.



    Exactly what I was going to point out. I suspect most iPhone users (and analysts who use iPhones) have no clue that an iPod touch has essentially all the capabilities of an iPhone except for access to an overpriced 3G network. As a result it is often overlooked in these analyses. You need wifi access to connect with the Internet but that is not a rare commodity. You can even make phone calls without that punishing monthly bill. It is Apple's secret weapon in the mobile OS wars since the competitors seldom make a comparable product.
  • Reply 35 of 35
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Entropys View Post


    ]







    I think studentz meant in terms of how the phone is actually used, not theoretical capability. These data would seem to support that view, despite looking off.



    If that is the case, do we stop counting any iPhone that is just used as a phone? Do we stop counting Macbooks as laptops if they never leave the desk they are placed on?
Sign In or Register to comment.