Apple-provided Java plug-in removed with software update

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 29


     


    The Apple Java for OS X 2012-006 1.0 update for Mac OS X 10.7, 10.8 operating systems is upsetting to many Google Chrome users!


     


    The Apple Java for OS X 2012-006 1.0 update for Mac OS X 10.7, 10.8 operating systems removes Java applet support from all browsers.


    If you exclusively or primarily use the 32-bit Google Chrome browser you are left with no way to run Java applets in the Chrome browser.


    After installing the Java for OS X 2012-006 1.0 update, anyone who visits a web page with a Java applet in the Chrome browser is directed to download the Java 7 applet plug-in from Oracle. 


     


    Attempting to do so generates the following message;


     


    "Chrome does not support Java 7. Java 7 runs only on 64-bit browsers and Chrome is a 32-bit browser.


    If you download Java 7, you will not be able to run Java content in Chrome and will need to use a 64-bit browser (such as Safari or Firefox) to run Java content within a browser. Additionally, installing Java 7 will disable the ability to use Apple Java 6 on your system."


     


    If you go to the Oracle site and follow the links to get the Java 6 version at the "Java 6 download page", there is only a message as follows for the MAC OS X system.


     


    "APPLE JAVA 6 FOR MAC OS X For Java versions 6 and below, Apple supplies their own version of Java. Use the Software Update feature (available on the Apple menu) to check that you have the most up-to-date version of Java 6 for your Mac. For issues related to Apple Java 6 on Mac, contact Apple Support. "


     


    I understand Apple wanting to get out of supporting Java, but with updates that 1st force the use of Apple's Java and then another update that subsequently remove it altogether, without a "fix" from either Google Chrome or Oracle, seems disingenuous at best and a deliberate attempt to drive some of the competitor's Google Chrome browser users to their Safari browser, as a suspicious possibility.

  • Reply 22 of 29


    Originally Posted by Gemini Apollo View Post


    use… …Google Chrome…



     


    Well, there's your problem.


     



    …with updates that 1st force the use of Apple's Java and then another update that subsequently remove it altogether, without a "fix" from either Google Chrome or Oracle…



     


    What responsibility of Apple's is it to wait for them to get their acts together?

  • Reply 23 of 29
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,389member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by v5v View Post


     


    Right, like you said, it SHOULDN'T be affected, but it wouldn't be the first time a "fix" for one issue wound up being an accidental "broken" somewhere else. :)


     


    I just found it interesting that of the three Macs I use regularly, only the one with Adobe CS apps installed even needs a Java runtime.  The other two don't have Java installed at all, neither runtime nor browser plug-in, and after two months I have yet to notice it's gone.  Does Photoshop's dependance on Java say anything about the quality of the programming, or is it a normal practice I just wouldn't have noticed if Apple hadn't quit developing their own version?



     


    Every time you update anything which applications rely on (be it OS X itself, or the Java runtime), there's a chance things will break because some underlying behaviour that the application relies on has changed.


     


    As for Adobe CS apps, I can't vouch for the quality of the programming in them, but Java on it's own is just fine as a programming language.  Objective-C (the native programming language used on OS X) actually has a lot in common with Java due to both being inspired by Smalltalk.  You can write crap code in any language -- it doesn't make the language bad.

  • Reply 24 of 29
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    use… …Google Chrome…

    Well, there's your problem.

    Yep, but who uses that? I've never seen anyone, heard of no one who uses Chrome. And I'm in IT. Well, most of the time when I work - I just don't work that much. Still, what are the benefits of Chrome? I have Safari as my main browser, which is pretty locked down with Extensions and all, use F if the page doesn't load things that I want to see, and on occasion I fire up Omniweb, simply because I like that company.
  • Reply 25 of 29

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    Yep, but who uses that? I've never seen anyone, heard of no one who uses Chrome. And I'm in IT. Well, most of the time when I work - I just don't work that much. Still, what are the benefits of Chrome? I have Safari as my main browser, which is pretty locked down with Extensions and all, use F if the page doesn't load things that I want to see, and on occasion I fire up Omniweb, simply because I like that company.


    You'll looking live....at one right here! I haven't used Safari in over three years. I gave up on it when Apple was in the height of its anti Flash pissing match with Adobe. Used Firefox until they went rapid development and every extension I used was broken every two to three weeks. Have been on Chrome ever sense. Best browser out there. IMO

  • Reply 26 of 29
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member


    I've had Java disabled in Safari and Firefox for as long as I can remember and haven't come across even a single site that seems to be affected by that choice.  Obviously there must be sites that use it for something since Chrome users are reporting problems.  What are the circumstances in which a Java plug-in would be required?  Are there certain kinds of sites that use it?  Is it common?

  • Reply 27 of 29

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by v5v View Post


    I've had Java disabled in Safari and Firefox for as long as I can remember and haven't come across even a single site that seems to be affected by that choice.  Obviously there must be sites that use it for something since Chrome users are reporting problems.  What are the circumstances in which a Java plug-in would be required?  Are there certain kinds of sites that use it?  Is it common?



     


    You must not work in any type of enterprise environment. Just about every "tool" to configure something uses a java applet, from printers (HP Directjet) to Cisco products (although I prefer the cli). There are also a number of enterprise websites that require java both intranet and internet sites. It's still to widely used to be deprecated. Just because it's not an ideal platform to use anymore doesn't mean it still isn't heavily in use today.

  • Reply 28 of 29
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,389member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by v5v View Post


    I've had Java disabled in Safari and Firefox for as long as I can remember and haven't come across even a single site that seems to be affected by that choice.  Obviously there must be sites that use it for something since Chrome users are reporting problems.  What are the circumstances in which a Java plug-in would be required?  Are there certain kinds of sites that use it?  Is it common?



     


    Java is a full-fledged application development language (not just an interactive animation design technology like Flash).  As such, you can do very powerful things with it.  However, it's not something you'd generally use for a website which just displays some information or has a small amount of interactivity like posting comments, adding items to a shopping cart, and whatnot.  It's overkill for that purpose (not to mention far more expensive to create).


     


    Where Java is useful is when you want to provide a browser-based application for configuring a device, configuring a network server, setting up a VPN connection, or the like.  Anywhere that you'd typically need to create a small application for many platforms (and distribute it) is a good candidate for a Java app.  Because then people can just point their browser at the right place, and they can use the app (as opposed to having to download the right version, install it, and run it).


     


    However, as the technologies behind HTML5 have matured over the years, they can now do a lot of what Java was typically used for.  That's the main reason why Java is falling by the wayside on the web.  However, it's still used a lot in embedded systems (you just don't know that it's Java) and, as UltraSPARC mentioned, for enterprise applications.

  • Reply 29 of 29
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by UltraSPARC View Post


    You must not work in any type of enterprise environment.



     


    I do, I've just given up on trying to do ANYTHING on the corporate intranet via the Mac because our coders seem very, very, very focused on IE.  VERY focused.

Sign In or Register to comment.