Apple looks to suppress noise created by iPhone 'vibrate' function

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35


    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

    And of course YOU are the only person that matters


     


    He did say personally…


     


    His other ideas are bad, sure, but he appended an opinion word.

  • Reply 22 of 35

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Galley View Post





    The intensity of a vibrating mechanism can be controlled. That is how force feedback is achieved on PlayStation controllers. Some of the vibrations can be very subtle, like when your wheel goes off the road in a driving game.


     


    I believe there is software that does this on the iPhone, available to those who are jailbroken image

  • Reply 23 of 35
    Right, why do we need a device to suck more battery life processing something this dumb when you can just shut vibration off?
  • Reply 24 of 35
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    bdkennedy1 wrote: »
    Right, why do we need a device to suck more battery life processing something this dumb when you can just shut vibration off?

    Because not everyone wants to shut the vibration off?

    You have the option to turn it off. If you don't like the vibration, you can turn it off and no harm is done.

    Others, OTOH, need to receive notifications in situations where the sound must be turned off. For them, vibration is essential.
  • Reply 25 of 35
    That would certainly be welcome. When most phones vibrate, it sounds like someone is trying to give an elephant an orgasm.
  • Reply 26 of 35

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GQB View Post



    Whenever I lose my phone in the house, and I've set it to 'stin', the only way I find it is by calling it and listening for the buzz. Don't make it quieter.


     


    Or you could just log on to icloud.com or use Find My iPhone from another iOS device, and have your missing phone sound an audible chime until you find it, which works whether it is on silent or not.

  • Reply 27 of 35
    bsenkabsenka Posts: 799member
    Isn't that nice of Apple to be looking into way to help its users miss more calls?
  • Reply 28 of 35
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    dysamoria wrote: »
    Would someone please engineer quieter garbage trucks, motor cycles, busses, cars, air conditioners, power tools, lawn care tools, doors, windows and building construction, etc., first? And please make them out to be hip and cool, so all my idiot fellow USA citizens stop making so much damned noise 24 hours a day.
    And work on making computers, printers, copiers and other office stuff quieter.
    And THEN work on making cell phone vibration noise suppressor technology.
    I HATE noise. But the cell phone vibrate mode is not even on my list of hate. At the moment: the obnoxious whining buzzing of a chainsaw behind my house is number one on my list.
    A society that values quiet will value a quieter cell phone vibration. Currently, it seems like USAmericans are in love with noise.

    Go live on a mountain side cabin like Ted Kaczynski but then you'll complain about the animal noises.
  • Reply 29 of 35
    wardcwardc Posts: 150member


    I wonder if Apple has considered other options, like a Thermal notification....There are heating pads, right? And the iPhone has a battery and can generate heat. If your phone in your pocket heated up to about 120 degrees, I think you would notice you had a call, right?


     


    I think the iPhone would quickly become a "cheese dog", being known as "The Weiner Melt"!

  • Reply 30 of 35
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Go live on a mountain side cabin like Ted Kaczynski but then you'll complain about the animal noises.

    Probably not as bad. I remember a documentary that showed how tribal people didn't suffer hearing loss the way more civilized people did, there's very little in the wild that's as damaging to hearing as urban activity.
  • Reply 31 of 35
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    jeffdm wrote: »
    Probably not as bad. I remember a documentary that showed how tribal people didn't suffer hearing loss the way more civilized people did, there's very little in the wild that's as damaging to hearing as urban activity.

    Thanks for the info but I was being facetious.
  • Reply 32 of 35
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    jeffdm wrote: »
    Probably not as bad. I remember a documentary that showed how tribal people didn't suffer hearing loss the way more civilized people did, there's very little in the wild that's as damaging to hearing as urban activity.

    If I remember correctly the vibrations of the hair cells slowly wear and if they are used more often they wear faster. That isn't to say that one will lose their hearing from repetitive common noises — I think you need NIHL (noise-induced hearing loss for that — but it could explain how some are more sensitive to unknown sound frequencies.

    I seem to recall Australian aborigines being able to hear a jet much sooner others because of their acute hearing but I wonder if the frequencies was so unique that their brain picked up on the odd sound much more readily than those that were familiar with it. I'd like to see experiments that would take someone from an "urban" environment and see if they can pick up on unknown frequencies that would be common in a more rural setting. For example, the sound of a cricket or cicada.
  • Reply 33 of 35
    chris_cachris_ca Posts: 2,543member
    gqb wrote: »
    Whenever I lose my phone in the house, and I've set it to 'stin', the only way I find it is by calling it and listening for the buzz.
    Just use FindMyiPhone and play a sound.
  • Reply 34 of 35
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Thanks for the info but I was being facetious.

    OK, sometimes I miss cues like that.

    chris_ca wrote: »
    Just use FindMyiPhone and play a sound.

    And holy cow is it loud. Rightfully so though, if it's in a bag in the corner of the room, it's very helpful. I use it every few weeks, it saves time.
    solipsismx wrote: »
    If I remember correctly the vibrations of the hair cells slowly wear and if they are used more often they wear faster. That isn't to say that one will lose their hearing from repetitive common noises — I think you need NIHL (noise-induced hearing loss for that — but it could explain how some are more sensitive to unknown sound frequencies.
    I seem to recall Australian aborigines being able to hear a jet much sooner others because of their acute hearing but I wonder if the frequencies was so unique that their brain picked up on the odd sound much more readily than those that were familiar with it. I'd like to see experiments that would take someone from an "urban" environment and see if they can pick up on unknown frequencies that would be common in a more rural setting. For example, the sound of a cricket or cicada.

    That's possible. I don't think there is any single frequency that exists in one environment and not the other, but sets of sounds, maybe.

    The hearing tests I'm aware of test single frequencies at a time. It's possible those tests used specific sound patterns, I just don't know about them.
  • Reply 35 of 35


    That's a horrible drawing of a desk, even by patent standards.

     

Sign In or Register to comment.