News Corp's iPad newspaper 'The Daily' shutting down Dec. 15

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
The Daily, a News Corporation publication that debuted on the iPad and was developed in cooperation with Apple, will cease to be on Dec. 15.

The shuttering of The Daily after less than two years was announced by News Corporation on Monday as part of a larger corporate restructuring. Publication of the digital newspaper will halt in less than two weeks.

?From its launch, The Daily was a bold experiment in digital publishing and an amazing vehicle for innovation," said News Corp CEO Rupert Murdoch. "Unfortunately, our experience was that we could not find a large enough audience quickly enough to convince us the business model was sustainable in the long-term.

"Therefore we will take the very best of what we have learned at The Daily and apply it to all our properties. Under the editorial leadership of Editor-in-Chief Col Allan and the business and digital leadership of Jesse, I know The New York Post will continue to grow and become stronger on the web, on mobile, and not least, the paper itself. I want to thank all of the journalists, digital and business professionals for the hard work they put into The Daily."

The Daily


News Corp announced that assets from The Daily will be folded into the Post, along with some employees. The publication was said to have about 120 employees after it axed a third of its staff in July.

The Daily was created to help newspapers transition into the digital era dominated by tablet devices like Apple's iPad. News Corp. Murdoch's team reportedly worked with Apple and its late co-founder Steve Jobs to create an iPad-centric publication which would later be ported to Google's Android operating system.

The Daily
Apple's Eddy Cue and News Corp.'s Rupert Murdoch unveiled The Daily in early 2011.


The iPad newspaper was announced at a press conference held by Apple and News Corp in January of 2011. At that event, Murdoch was joined onstage by Apple senior vice president Eddy Cue.

The Daily was the first application on Apple's iOS App Store to feature the in-app subscription service. That functionality later became a major part of the Newsstand feature of iOS.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    That's too bad, I read the Daily every day & it's great on the iPad!
  • Reply 2 of 35
    News Corp's editorial integrity was always a barrier for me - not surprised.
  • Reply 3 of 35
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,483member


    Murdoch is evil. I'm glad his filth won't be polluting iDevices. 


     


    I would much rather support something like The Magazine. 

  • Reply 4 of 35


    LOL Tyrannosaurus sex. I think the headlines on the sample cover are perfectly emblematic of why this venture failed.

  • Reply 5 of 35
    ifij775ifij775 Posts: 470member


    The WSJ has a great iPad app, which I think is also owned by Murdoch. 

  • Reply 6 of 35
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    LOL Tyrannosaurus sex. I think the headlines on the sample cover are perfectly emblematic of why this venture failed.
    Exactly. Now if only Apple would let me stick newstand in a folder since I rarely ever use it.
  • Reply 7 of 35
    irelandireland Posts: 17,771member


    To support nothing that man touches. Personal policy.

  • Reply 8 of 35


    That's a darn shame.  If a digital newspaper can't survive on the iPad, I guess it won't survive on any tablet platform.

  • Reply 9 of 35



    #next_pages_container { width: 5px; hight: 5px; position: absolute; top: -100px; left: -100px; z-index: 2147483647 !important; }
    News Corp's Rupert Murdoch has admitted that the only reason he became an 'American' was so that he could attempt to take over our media and affect public policy. 


     


    I wouldn't give a dime to this tabloid hack and corporate propagandist.


     


    Good riddance.


     


     


     



  • Reply 10 of 35
    rot'napplerot'napple Posts: 1,839member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post


    LOL Tyrannosaurus sex. I think the headlines on the sample cover are perfectly emblematic of why this venture failed.



     


    If it is true what they say regarding a "man's hand size"?  If you look at the Tyrannosaurus's hand versus its overall size, one could probably understand why T-Rex was always sooo grumpy!  I mean look at T-Rex... a big head and little hands, what to do... what to do.


     


    Regarding story about "The Daily" closing... Does nothing survive in you know who's economy?! image


     


    Gallagher's Steak House since 1927, met its doom during you know who's economy.


     


    famed Stage Deli See ya!


    /


    /


    /

  • Reply 11 of 35
    Nah, it's not true about a "man's hand size".

    I've got tiny hands.
  • Reply 12 of 35
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Exactly. Now if only Apple would let me stick newstand in a folder since I rarely ever use it.


     


    I have yet to find a single magazine that's worth the effort of putting it into NewsStand.  


     


    The content is almost zero for most magazines, they cost a relative fortune, and they are full of advertisements even though you've paid for the "content" outright already.  


     


    Magazines, digital or "regular" also have the same problem they've had for years now which is that all of the information they do contain is months old.  The Internet will continue to demolish magazine sales regardless of the fact that they are now digital.  Why buy a computer magazine when the articles are all about things that are already old news on the web?  Same with Politics and most every other subject.  


     


    Magazines are just for old people to read about stuff that everyone who has the Internet (or any real active interest in the topic), knew about months ago.  

  • Reply 13 of 35
    There's numerous reasons for the failure of this venture but the primary reason is Robert Murdoch.
  • Reply 14 of 35
    mrstepmrstep Posts: 478member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post


    <snip>


     


    Regarding story about "The Daily" closing... Does nothing survive in you know who's economy?! image


     


    Gallagher's Steak House since 1927, met its doom during you know who's economy.


     


    famed Stage Deli See ya!


    /


    /


    /



     


    "you know who's economy"? I assume that either means Bill Clinton because of the timeless question of what the meaning "is" is, or George Bush II because he'd probably turn "whose" into "who is" as well and tout not knowing the difference as a unique American strength.


     


    The fundamental problem was that the content was vapid, making it even more difficult for it to succeed in an industry that's going through a paper-to-digital transition where other - often more timely and freely accessible! - content is challenging it. Or... I guess we can try to make it purely political.

  • Reply 15 of 35


    I read The Daily nearly every day.


     


    I too am against Rupert Murdock's agenda, but found The Daily to be reasonably unbiased.


     


    They did many creative things with the format; pictures, animation, animated polls, etc.


     


    The cover chosen for this story is more solicitous than most. Most covers weren't bad.


     


    The application did suffer from some annoying bugs resulting in crashes of the app.


     


    It's too bad that this effort failed, as I'd like to read the newspaper/magazine on my iPad.

  • Reply 16 of 35
    mrstepmrstep Posts: 478member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


     


    I have yet to find a single magazine that's worth the effort of putting it into NewsStand.  


     


    The content is almost zero for most magazines, they cost a relative fortune, and they are full of advertisements even though you've paid for the "content" outright already.  


     


    Magazines, digital or "regular" also have the same problem they've had for years now which is that all of the information they do contain is months old.  The Internet will continue to demolish magazine sales regardless of the fact that they are now digital.  Why buy a computer magazine when the articles are all about things that are already old news on the web?  Same with Politics and most every other subject.  


     


    Magazines are just for old people to read about stuff that everyone who has the Internet (or any real active interest in the topic), knew about months ago.  



     


    Totally. I remember grabbing the morning paper to see where stock prices closed the day before and having to look through Computer Shopper to find mail-order deals on software and hardware in the pre-Al-Gore's-interweb days. ;)  Nowadays, it's really no comparison.  Product launches, reviews, general news - they're all there immediately, making a paid magazine, particularly one like this that arguably had less depth than many others, a really tough sell.


     


    The price issue is definitely interesting since the magazines traditionally make most of their money from the ads - which quickly turn an online magazine into a cluttered (and much larger download size) mess. It seems that there's very little allowance made for the fact that the distribution becomes essentially free - which would logically lead to either cutting most of the ads out or lowering the price. But then again, maybe that's less the case than I'd think - I'm nowhere near the magazine industry and really have no idea. :) 

  • Reply 17 of 35
    urthourtho Posts: 17member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post




    Quote:

    Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post



    LOL Tyrannosaurus sex. I think the headlines on the sample cover are perfectly emblematic of why this venture failed.


    Exactly. Now if only Apple would let me stick newstand in a folder since I rarely ever use it.


    I just wish Apple would let us hide/uninstall anything we will not use.  Like Newsstand, or Game Center, or Stocks.... ect.

  • Reply 18 of 35

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


     


    I have yet to find a single magazine that's worth the effort of putting it into NewsStand.  


     


    The content is almost zero for most magazines, they cost a relative fortune, and they are full of advertisements even though you've paid for the "content" outright already.  


     


    Magazines, digital or "regular" also have the same problem they've had for years now which is that all of the information they do contain is months old.  The Internet will continue to demolish magazine sales regardless of the fact that they are now digital.  Why buy a computer magazine when the articles are all about things that are already old news on the web?  Same with Politics and most every other subject.  


     


    Magazines are just for old people to read about stuff that everyone who has the Internet (or any real active interest in the topic), knew about months ago.  



    Don't buy them then, wait until you grow up.

  • Reply 19 of 35

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


     


    Magazines, digital or "regular" also have the same problem they've had for years now which is that all of the information they do contain is months old.  The Internet will continue to demolish magazine sales regardless of the fact that they are now digital.  Why buy a computer magazine when the articles are all about things that are already old news on the web?  Same with Politics and most every other subject.  


     


    Magazines are just for old people to read about stuff that everyone who has the Internet (or any real active interest in the topic), knew about months ago.  





    Other view: magazines are for depth analyses, requiring effort. The web, instant as it is, definitely doesn't carry the quality of information that the Herald Tribune, Le Monde Diplomatique or the FT do.


     


    Yellow journalism is dying at last? So what. It's done enough damage in its 150 years of existence that I say "good riddance".

  • Reply 20 of 35
    shogunshogun Posts: 362member
    If it was any good it would have built the audience it needed... especially in the high-politics run up to a presidential election. The gimmicky headlines were AWFUL after the first one or two you read. Got old real fast. Also the gossipy angle. Too gossippy to be useful to news people, perhaps too newsy to be useful to gossip readers.

    A failed experiment.
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