RIM could license software, sell hardware division after BB10 launch

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 44
    dbtincdbtinc Posts: 134member


    The end is near, I hear the fat lady ... great run while it lasted ...

  • Reply 22 of 44
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    bobringer wrote: »
    The problem with RIMM (and has been for years) is that they have no idea what they want to be.

    They are an ENTERPRISE company, and what they do best is secure e-mail.  I remember when the Playbook was announced, they SAID that this was going to be their focus.  All the marketing materials... all the videos... EVERYTHING, focused on Facebook sharing... photos... games.

    Same with the new stuff.  Are they going to try to get consumers to switch to BB10 by convincing them it's a better device to share photos than an iOS or Android device?  Are they going to keep their corporate customers with this strategy?  What is the point?

    Similarly... I remember seeing about two years ago a big section of their website dedicated to a "theme builder."  Honestly?  Rome is burning around you and *THIS* is what you are focused on?  If you have *ONE* person working on this, it's one too many.  Actually:  https://developer.blackberry.com/themestudio/

    They have no clue what they want to be... they are going to die because of it.

    Even until very recently, they had a product that was entrenched in the corporate world around the globe.  BES was used by *EVERYBODY* and they would have loved to continue to use it.  RIMM had an opportunity to focus on this and become the leading provider of secure communications software and services (on the back end).  Instead... they had people working on developing a "theme builder" for phones that nobody wanted.

    Idiots...

    Losing focus is bad, but I don't know if they would survive even if they retained their enterprise focus. It's an open question whether users would want to carry two devices in the long term, and I think the loser would generally be the BB device.
  • Reply 23 of 44
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    drblank wrote: »
    The REAL question is To Whom? I don't think anyone is interested.

    I strongly disagree. If the new version is any good, I would expect quite a bit of interest. Samsung or HTC would be prime candidates. Perhaps Google.

    A lot of companies are starting to realize how much they give up by being tied to Android and would like an alternative. Obviously, Samsung or HTC wouldn't drop Android entirely, but they might well like to have an alternative line of phones so they have a backup plan - and can tap into the people who don't like Android for one reason or another.
  • Reply 24 of 44

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post





    I strongly disagree. If the new version is any good, I would expect quite a bit of interest. Samsung or HTC would be prime candidates. Perhaps Google.



    A lot of companies are starting to realize how much they give up by being tied to Android and would like an alternative. Obviously, Samsung or HTC wouldn't drop Android entirely, but they might well like to have an alternative line of phones so they have a backup plan - and can tap into the people who don't like Android for one reason or another.


    Why would they do that? Just fork off Android and you already have a more robust OS to start with and on top of that one that you've already spent time adding additional elements to. Plus you still could tap into the app market that Android has rather than taking a risk and hoping that the market for RIM doesn't sink.

  • Reply 25 of 44


    Pity poor RIMM. Their sales have fallen so far that it view with Microsoft for last place on the charts.


     


    Never before have too few battled with too big to produce too little too late and priced too high.

  • Reply 26 of 44
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    sockrolid wrote: »
    It's still a very young industry.  The post-PC era has just barely begun.
    But that's no excuse for RIM letting Apple and its imitators pass them after having the early lead.
    RIM has fallen well behind the pack now, and that gap is "growing quickly."

    Step four, of course, is "the cloud."  The most successful post-PC players all have robust cloud infrastructures
    to support their content infrastructures.  The "cloud" is now as important to those big players as iTunes
    was to Apple in the 2000s.  The key word being "big."  Because cloud-based computing requires massive
    server farms on huge tracts of land.  All of which requires both time and money to acquire, develop, implement,
    test, and scale up.  And RIM has neither time nor money right now.

    Last I checked RIM had massive server farms in Canada. They're well versed in cloud based services. Their email delivery and security is still tops in the industry which are very attractive to many corporations.
  • Reply 27 of 44

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post





    Losing focus is bad, but I don't know if they would survive even if they retained their enterprise focus. It's an open question whether users would want to carry two devices in the long term, and I think the loser would generally be the BB device.


     


    I agree with that...  But if they hadn't lost focus many years ago they might be in a better place today.  I think they should have dumped their hardware division 3-4 years ago and focused on the enterprise back office back then.  Once the Storm came out, it was clear that they were never going compete on the device front.  Your point about BYOD is exactly right.  Not sure why they thought THEY were going to be able to make the devices that employees were going to push employers to allow them to use.

  • Reply 28 of 44


    With Android, iOS and Windows 8 there is no reason for Blackberry to even exist anymore. They have proven an utter inability to operate and compete is a company, just take them out of their misery.

  • Reply 29 of 44
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    jragosta wrote: »
    I strongly disagree. If the new version is any good, I would expect quite a bit of interest. Samsung or HTC would be prime candidates. Perhaps Google.

    A lot of companies are starting to realize how much they give up by being tied to Android and would like an alternative. Obviously, Samsung or HTC wouldn't drop Android entirely, but they might well like to have an alternative line of phones so they have a backup plan - and can tap into the people who don't like Android for one reason or another.

    I agree. BBs are also very data efficient. Any company with data overage concerns would be attracted to switching to BB.
  • Reply 30 of 44
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    With Android, iOS and Windows 8 there is no reason for Blackberry to even exist anymore. They have proven an utter inability to operate and compete is a company, just take them out of their misery.

    I wouldn't write them off just yet. Companies have come back from tailspins and recovered nicely, especially one we all know quite well, Apple.
  • Reply 31 of 44
    alexmitalexmit Posts: 112member
    I should put my bid in to buy that out. It can't be worth more than $50 at this point. I could use the ownership of it as a part of a pickup line regimen at my local bar. But would anyone actually remember who they were in the first place?
  • Reply 32 of 44
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,158member


    RIM is is always late to the game. It took them forever to come up with an answer. BB10 will not save them.

  • Reply 33 of 44

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Thorsten Heins, chief executive of Research In Motion, said on Monday that the embattled BlackBerry maker must ensure that its forthcoming BlackBerry 10 models are successful before the company can consider strategic alliances, such as licensing its software or even selling off its hardware production.

     




    Idiotic comment.


     


    "Hey buyer/developer, we plan on selling off asap. Do buy this doomed product."

  • Reply 34 of 44

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Last I checked RIM had massive server farms in Canada. They're well versed in cloud based services. Their email delivery and security is still tops in the industry which are very attractive to many corporations.




    Apple should buy them. RiM is good in what Apple (iCloud pings (mobile)Me, so I respond) is not, and the opposite.

  • Reply 35 of 44
    mikeb85mikeb85 Posts: 506member


    It's never too late to play catch up.  Markets and consumers change all the time.  RIM was once top dog and it was considered absurd that anyone could catch them.  Now look at them.  


     


    Anyhow, the phone and system looks great, it could be popular, especially among corporations, business people, and people who want lower data costs (RIM has traditionally given carriers the tools to keep different kinds of data access separate, and enabled different kinds of data plans).  Keep in mind RIM still has a pretty large user base, so you can't write them off.  Especially the upcoming BlackBerry that's said to have a physical keyboard AND a fairly decent 720 by 720 screen.  


     


    Anyhow, I wouldn't bet against RIM, though I certainly don't think their comeback is a sure thing either.  

  • Reply 36 of 44
    larryalarrya Posts: 552member
    mikeb85 wrote: »
    It's never too late to play catch up.  Markets and consumers change all the time.  RIM was once top dog and it was considered absurd that anyone could catch them.  Now look at them.  

    Anyhow, the phone and system looks great, it could be popular, especially among corporations, business people, and people who want lower data costs (RIM has traditionally given carriers the tools to keep different kinds of data access separate, and enabled different kinds of data plans).  Keep in mind RIM still has a pretty large user base, so you can't write them off.  Especially the upcoming BlackBerry that's said to have a physical keyboard AND a fairly decent 720 by 720 screen.  

    Anyhow, I wouldn't bet against RIM, though I certainly don't think their comeback is a sure thing either.  

    I agree, and I may get one. I love my iPhone, but my company is very conservative and is still "testing" BYOD software like the Goode Server (sp?). I use quotes because i think they'll drag their feet forever. Anyway, they do support RIM devices.

    I have been getting burned by work calls and text messages eating up my personsl plan, but I refuse to carry a second device. If RIM can make a phone that is even in the same league as the iPhone, I'll ask my boss for one and also use it for my very light personal needs. There must be others in my situation, where my addition to RIM's customer base would be a subtraction from Apple's. This would cause market share to shift relatively quickly.
  • Reply 37 of 44
    I think this gives a better idea of BB10 than the other video


  • Reply 38 of 44
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    I think this gives a better idea of BB10 than the other video

    Definitely better. The OS is even more impressive than it was before.

    If I have any complaint it's with the HW. It looks great but the fit and finish looks less refined than the iPhone.
  • Reply 39 of 44
    philipmphilipm Posts: 239member


    In poorer countries like South Africa they sell in huge numbers as a cheap way to get 3G internet. I moved back to South Africa from Australia and was surprised to see Blackberries everywhere. I can't recall seeing one at all in Australia though no doubt they have a presence.


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bobringer View Post


    The problem with RIMM (and has been for years) is that they have no idea what they want to be.


     


    They are an ENTERPRISE company, and what they do best is secure e-mail.  I remember when the Playbook was announced, they SAID that this was going to be their focus.  All the marketing materials... all the videos... EVERYTHING, focused on Facebook sharing... photos... games.


     


    Same with the new stuff.  Are they going to try to get consumers to switch to BB10 by convincing them it's a better device to share photos than an iOS or Android device?  Are they going to keep their corporate customers with this strategy?  What is the point?


     


    Similarly... I remember seeing about two years ago a big section of their website dedicated to a "theme builder."  Honestly?  Rome is burning around you and *THIS* is what you are focused on?  If you have *ONE* person working on this, it's one too many.  Actually:  https://developer.blackberry.com/themestudio/


     


    They have no clue what they want to be... they are going to die because of it.


     


    Even until very recently, they had a product that was entrenched in the corporate world around the globe.  BES was used by *EVERYBODY* and they would have loved to continue to use it.  RIMM had an opportunity to focus on this and become the leading provider of secure communications software and services (on the back end).  Instead... they had people working on developing a "theme builder" for phones that nobody wanted.


     


    Idiots...


  • Reply 40 of 44
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    1) I think 70k is very reasonable to assume a healthy ecosystem. If they vet their apps, a good SDK, and good support from companies they could have a more attractive store than Android which might be able to attract users and developers.

    The 70k figure is somewhat misleading. Keep in mind RIM's positioning - heavy duty business apps. Even today, their business app selection is very strong. Sure, they don't have 500 different Angry Birds clones or 700 fart apps or 2,000 flashlight apps, but there are still businesses out there that rely on Blackberry apps.

    That's why I suggested that it would be attractive to someone. The ability to immediately access the business market with a differentiated, compelling product would be attractive.
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