Garmin brings social network support to StreetPilot Onboard and Navigon iOS apps

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Despite the overwhelming popularity of Google's free mapping app and Apple's own Maps GPS navigation firm Garmin has continued to embrace the iOS platform. The StreetPilot Onboard and Navigon apps have been met with mixed reception, so I was curious to see if the latest versions have brought any significant improvements.

Garmin


Garmin's StreetPilot Onboard and Navigon now feature integration with Apple's iCloud, theoretically enabling users to easily access their saved locations from multiple iOS devices. This appears to be a sticking point with some users, however, as a larger number of App Store reviews voice frustration over lost favorites and problems saving new locations.

Glympse


In addition to closer ties with iCloud, the apps also feature integration with social networking tools Foursquare and Glympse. Foursquare users can configure automatic check-in and access the location-based network's search content without leaving the Garmin apps, streamlining the habitual process.

Glympse is just emerging from startup stage, taking a different tack by focusing on personal notifications. If traffic causes delays on the way to meet friends, for example, the Glympse system will keep everyone informed via text message or a web-based interface.

Foursquare


Integrating new location-based services makes sense for Garmin's iOS strategy, but many of the App Store reviewers would have preferred if the company focused more on making a stable navigation utility before adding the social networking capabilities.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,141member
    It's a tough field for Garmin to plough. I wish them luck as with any iOS developer but I would not want to be trying to compete against free integrated apps from Apple with a $32 version in any field. I suspect they might feel they have a shot after all the iHater's comments about Apple's maps but I suspect that is to be a shorted lived issue.
  • Reply 2 of 14
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,347member
    I don't think anyone hates Apple maps $32 worth.
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Do any of the other nav apps allow offline navigation? This is Navigon's huge advantage IMO. I've been using it since before Garmin bought them and still like it. For my daily commute I use Waze for their traffic info plus I get to feel like a contributor to that info, but anytime I'm going far I use Navigon. One of the other nice things about Navigon is that you can pick and choose which state's maps to store on your phone.
  • Reply 4 of 14
    Actually, I dislike Apple Maps $49 worth. So I have StreetPilot for iOS. I'd had a NUVI for years, and it was wonderful. It took some trauma to the charging port about the time I got my iPhone 4. Granted Apple Maps isn't full-featured on the 4, but after trying Waze (cute, but somehow thought my office was 4,200 miles from my house) and MotionX Drive (best voice by far, but too-small interface elements for driving) it was a shot at Garmin - as Street Pilot (mostly) uses the same interface as a NUVI. There are some surprising quirks - searching for POIs does not live-update the found list for distance and direction - you have to go back and just re "OK" the search - annoying and dangerous. And some interface elements are smaller than their NUVI counterparts, but not as bad as MotionX. As for the social aspect - couldn't care less. I'm trying to get somewhere not shmooze while driving. I'll likely get traffic added, though with Waze and MotionX it often seemed that they knew when a traffic issue started but not when it was over. More than once I took a detour only to look at the supposed traffic crunch parallel to me - and there was none. The traffic on the local radio was at least as good if not better.
  • Reply 5 of 14


    Foursquare has always been a meh to me. But if they could figure out a way to be able to send alerts about bad traffic, accidents etc and then offer to route around them, that could be a useful 'social' trick.

  • Reply 6 of 14
    herbapouherbapou Posts: 2,221member
    It's a tough field for Garmin to plough. I wish them luck as with any iOS developer but I would not want to be trying to compete against free integrated apps from Apple with a $32 version in any field. I suspect they might feel they have a shot after all the iHater's comments about Apple's maps but I suspect that is to be a shorted lived issue.

    I think what most people fail to understand is google and apple maps required an internet connection, which kind of makes them work only inside youre own country because once you cross a border, you get into data roaming, which is vey very expensive.
  • Reply 7 of 14
    mrstepmrstep Posts: 446member
    I had Navigon well before Apple maps, and while Apple's directions work fine in some cases, I really do like that Navigon has the entire maps on the device - MUCH more useful in cases where we're on vacation in areas with spotty cell coverage (Colorado, Wyoming, Montana in the past year, Europe as well - and I certainly don't want to be paying for roaming or a European data plan on AT&T and be chewing it up with maps!).

    So you don't really have to hate any other mapping solution to find Navigon useful... and I actually hate the Navigon address entry piece more than I hate any of the other solutions (but the rest makes up for it)! ;)
  • Reply 8 of 14


    Apple Maps and Google Maps are brilliant if you can guarantee a reliable data connection but absolutely useless without one, such as when I'm in Europe without data roaming or up in the Scottish highlands where a voice signal is rare enough and 3G data is practically unheard of outside the bigger towns.


     


    Offline usability is why I was happy to pay for TomTom's Western Europe app  - loads cheaper than the equivalent separate sat nav system and you even get free map updates when the app gets updated.

  • Reply 9 of 14
    I must be missing something here. If you don't have a data connection, how does the app know to tell you when to turn a corner, or if you've made a wrong turn?
  • Reply 10 of 14

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by joseph_went_south View Post



    I must be missing something here. If you don't have a data connection, how does the app know to tell you when to turn a corner, or if you've made a wrong turn?


    The iPhone and iPad w/cellular have built-in GPS receivers.

  • Reply 11 of 14

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jpellino View Post



    Actually, I dislike Apple Maps $49 worth. 


    Had I waited a week I coulda disliked it for only $32. 

  • Reply 12 of 14

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by deekster_caddy View Post



    Do any of the other nav apps allow offline navigation?


    Yes, TomTom has own maps included in the app itself. I used it even on iPad2/3G without activating the cellular.

  • Reply 13 of 14
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by joseph_went_south View Post



    I must be missing something here. If you don't have a data connection, how does the app know to tell you when to turn a corner, or if you've made a wrong turn?


    navigon and others download the maps onto your phone. tomtom needs over 1.5GB for the data


    with navigon you can download the maps by state. includes POI's like gas stations as well.


     


    its not pretty 3d maps, but enough to navigate and not get lost.

  • Reply 14 of 14
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member


    I never understood people's outrage over Apple's Maps when it switched from Google's data. The lack of turn by turn before the switch made it a non-starter for me. I used Navigon because 1) it offered turn by turn, and 2) the maps are stored off line. I actually like Apple's Maps, but in my opinion Navigon is better than Google and Apple's maps. 

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