Apple CEO Tim Cook apologizes for warranty issues in China, announces changes

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 90

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post




     


    Not sure there's xenophobia in this thread.



     


    Nevertheless, I would like to apologize for the xenophobia in this thread.

  • Reply 22 of 90
    ankleskaterankleskater Posts: 1,287member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LighteningKid View Post


    Could you not get a better English translation? I'm not entirely sure what this letter says.





    Here's a better English translation:


     


    From time to time, Apple screws up. From time to time, Apple should speak up sooner rather than later, but makes a bad decision of speaking up later. This happens because, despite being a highly profitable and innovative company, we are made up of humans and prone to human mistakes. When we recognize these mistakes, we will own them and speak up. We do not need fanboyz and teenagers defending us on websites that really have no impact on our stock price anyhow. We wish these unwanted defenders to get their own lives. This way, they can be constructive human beings, establish rewarding careers and will be able to afford to buy more Apple gear.


     


    Yours sincerely,


     


    Tim Cook

  • Reply 23 of 90
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,052member


    It seems that Cook has not directly responded with the criticisms.  One of the criticism is Apple keeps the back of a defective iPhone when replacing it with a new iphone.  Another one is Apple not giving back the bad parts back to the customer.

  • Reply 24 of 90
    ankleskaterankleskater Posts: 1,287member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    That's fine. There's India and the rest of the planet. Screw copyists, wherever they are.


     


    Not sure there's xenophobia in this thread.



     


    If "Screw the fricking Chinese" is not xenophobic, can you enlighten us as to what it is? I am open to a proper characterization.

  • Reply 25 of 90
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

    If "Screw the fricking Chinese" is not xenophobic, can you enlighten us as to what it is?


     


    Nonsense. I'd say that to anyone trying to pull this nonsense.

  • Reply 26 of 90
    ankleskaterankleskater Posts: 1,287member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Nonsense. I'd say that to anyone trying to pull this nonsense.





    Knowing you, I believe it.


     


    But words stand on their own context. Imagine someone Chinese reading it, let alone someone from China. Anyhow, give it some thought, if you will.

  • Reply 27 of 90
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

    Imagine someone Chinese reading it, let alone someone from China.


     


    Then that's their fault for continuing to believe it now that they know the context.

  • Reply 28 of 90
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,743member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post


     


    I am open to a proper characterization.



     


    If anybody is guilty of xenophobia, it is China.

  • Reply 29 of 90
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Not sure there's xenophobia in this thread.



    Xenophobia is a fundamental Chinese cultural 'value'. Mistrust, suspicion, opportunistic behavior, all characteristic of Chinese culture. Nobody can be trusted except family. So not only are they xeonophobic with respect to foreigners, this distrust extends to everyone. The opportunistic tendencies of Chinese are well known. They are often accused of cheating, from the government officials all the way down to the street vendors. It is common practice for example for a market seller of fish to swap out a fish that a customer has selected from the display case with a lesser quality item by wrapping up the item below the field of view of the customer. Similarly farmers are accused of injecting water into their produce to make it weigh more, and they don't use clean water either. In China you won't see public street signs or traffic signs made out of aluminum or steel. They would be stolen overnight. As in third world countries, you will see bars on residential widows, but unlike other countries, in China the bars go all the way to the top of the building because otherwise thieves will scale even a tall building to break in.


     


    I have several Chinese friends in the US. The closest friend regularly visits China and he is the one who shared this information with me.

  • Reply 30 of 90
    stelligentstelligent Posts: 2,680member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


     


    If anybody is guilty of xenophobia, it is China.



     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Xenophobia is a fundamental Chinese cultural 'value'. Mistrust, suspicion, opportunistic behavior, all characteristic of Chinese culture. Nobody can be trusted except family. So not only are they xeonophobic with respect to foreigners, this distrust extends to everyone. The opportunistic tendencies of Chinese are well known. They are often accused of cheating, from the government officials all the way down to the street vendors. It is common practice for example for a market seller of fish to swap out a fish that a customer has selected from the display case with a lesser quality item by wrapping up the item below the field of view of the customer. Similarly farmers are accused of injecting water into their produce to make it weigh more, and they don't use clean water either. In China you won't see street signs or traffic signs made out of aluminum or steel. They would be stolen overnight. As in third world countries, you will see bars on residential widows, but unlike other countries, the bars go all the way to the top of the building because otherwise thieves will scale even a tall building to break in.


     


    I have several Chinese friends in the US. The closest friend regularly visits China and he is the one who shared this information with me.



     


    Another thread going down the gutter.


     


    image

  • Reply 31 of 90


    I am not surprised really, in fact I was expecting the apology, considering few days ago Apple was accused being Arrogant.  This is something Apple have for many years been accused of and as a result, it’s reputation has been tainted across the globe.  You have to understand, Apple as a brand is under pressure from all directions at the moment, the rise of Android, the lack of innovation and the subsequent fall of Apple shares, these are all important factors that can destroy a company if they are not careful.


    There is an old saying "Live today, Fight tomorrow" and I think Tim's apology is exactly that, they need the Chinese for now but I hope they remember this and shift manufacturing slowly back to USA but this cannot happen in one day, it takes years and years to build the factories and train the people, although I am sure, it will happen over time.


    That's my penny’s worth.....

  • Reply 32 of 90
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,052member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Xenophobia is a fundamental Chinese cultural 'value'. Mistrust, suspicion, opportunistic behavior, all characteristic of Chinese culture. Nobody can be trusted except family. So not only are they xeonophobic with respect to foreigners, this distrust extends to everyone. The opportunistic tendencies of Chinese are well known. They are often accused of cheating, from the government officials all the way down to the street vendors. It is common practice for example for a market seller of fish to swap out a fish that a customer has selected from the display case with a lesser quality item by wrapping up the item below the field of view of the customer. Similarly farmers are accused of injecting water into their produce to make it weigh more, and they don't use clean water either. In China you won't see public street signs or traffic signs made out of aluminum or steel. They would be stolen overnight. As in third world countries, you will see bars on residential widows, but unlike other countries, in China the bars go all the way to the top of the building because otherwise thieves will scale even a tall building to break in.


     


    I have several Chinese friends in the US. The closest friend regularly visits China and he is the one who shared this information with me.





    What you said is not Chinese culture.  It is the poor people trying to take advantage of other people.  China still has many poor people.  Therefore it is very easy for you to find many instances. I assure you as China's GDP keeps doubling these instances will occur less and less often.

  • Reply 33 of 90


    I am not surprised really, in fact I was expecting the apology, considering few days ago Apple was accused being Arrogant.  This is something Apple have for many years been accused of and as a result, it’s reputation has been tainted across the globe.  You have to understand, Apple as a brand is under pressure from all directions at the moment, the rise of Android, the lack of innovation and the subsequent fall of Apple shares, these are all important factors that can destroy a company if they are not careful.


    There is an old saying "Live today, Fight tomorrow" and I think Tim's apology is exactly that, they need the Chinese for now but I hope they remember this and shift manufacturing slowly back to USA but this cannot happen in one day, it takes years and years to build the factories and train the people, although I am sure, it will happen over time.


     


    That's my penny’s worth.....

  • Reply 34 of 90
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

    …in China the bars go all the way to the top of the building because otherwise thieves will scale even a tall building to break in.


     


    Wish they could put that drive into achieving something meaningful instead of copying others' products. And theft, obviously.

  • Reply 35 of 90
    ankleskaterankleskater Posts: 1,287member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Xenophobia is a fundamental Chinese cultural 'value'. Mistrust, suspicion, opportunistic behavior, all characteristic of Chinese culture. Nobody can be trusted except family. So not only are they xeonophobic with respect to foreigners, this distrust extends to everyone. The opportunistic tendencies of Chinese are well known. They are often accused of cheating, from the government officials all the way down to the street vendors. It is common practice for example for a market seller of fish to swap out a fish that a customer has selected from the display case with a lesser quality item by wrapping up the item below the field of view of the customer. Similarly farmers are accused of injecting water into their produce to make it weigh more, and they don't use clean water either. In China you won't see public street signs or traffic signs made out of aluminum or steel. They would be stolen overnight. As in third world countries, you will see bars on residential widows, but unlike other countries, in China the bars go all the way to the top of the building because otherwise thieves will scale even a tall building to break in.


     


    I have several Chinese friends in the US. The closest friend regularly visits China and he is the one who shared this information with me.



     


    The old "I have XYZ friends and so I cannot be called racist against XYZ" line. Doesn't work. Doesn't excuse anyone from stereotyping. Doesn't belong in any discourse amongst civilized, educated individuals. Doesn't paint a decent picture of utterer.

  • Reply 36 of 90
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

    The old "I have XYZ friends and so I cannot be called racist against XYZ" line. Doesn't work. Doesn't excuse anyone from stereotyping. Doesn't belong in any discourse amongst civilized, educated individuals. Doesn't paint a decent picture of utterer.


     


    Except there's nothing stereotypical or even xenophobic in what he's saying. Try reading what he said. It's a set of experiences from a location. It could be any location. It happens to be China, since that's what we're talking about.

  • Reply 37 of 90
    zoffdinozoffdino Posts: 192member
    Who did Tim Cook have to fire this time because that person refused to sign his/her name under this apology?

    Really the Chinese media is a fucktard. Apple says very clearly in the warranty that they may replace faulty iPhones with new parts or refurb units. It's their obsession with "virginity" that drives them to such insane demand that brand new phones must be offered.
  • Reply 38 of 90


    I really appreciate Tim Cook's approach.  However I fear that the attack on Apple is retaliation for the US Government saying that Chinese tech systems may not be used.

  • Reply 39 of 90
    negafoxnegafox Posts: 480member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tenfingers View Post



    It would be good to disclaim that this is a google translation. Otherwise, you need to fire your translator.


    What? We cannot have Apple Insider admitting they are relying on Google for some services.


     


    In all seriousness, the English translation appears to be a word-for-word match when I use Google Translate.  It would be nice for Apple Insider to provide a disclaimer they used a web translator rather than a professional one as this translation barely makes sense in some parts.

  • Reply 40 of 90
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member






    Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post




     


    The old "I have XYZ friends and so I cannot be called racist against XYZ" line. Doesn't work. Doesn't excuse anyone from stereotyping. Doesn't belong in any discourse amongst civilized, educated individuals. Doesn't paint a decent picture of utterer.



    That certainly wasn't my intention. I merely stated the part about my friend as a disclaimer that I do not know these things first hand. Perhaps his characterizations are exaggerated, which might be understandable as he was originally an exiled Chinese citizen who was formerly a prominent university professor there as was his father. His father was executed during the cultural revolution. My friend's family was finally able to move to the US. I have known him for 15 years.


     


    Edit typos:

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