Apple job listings point to new iWork for iOS and OS X with HiDPI graphics

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
A handful of recently discovered job listings suggest a possible next-generation iWork software suite may soon see release, with the latest postings asking for specialists in quality assurance, one of the final steps in software building.

iWork Jobs


While some of the listings date back to the end of March, the most recent ad for "SW QA iWork" (via AppleBitch) hit Apple's job portal only two days ago.

As of this writing, there are eight iWork-related positions on the "Jobs at Apple" webpage, three of which deal with quality assurance or software verification. One listing, posted on May 11, is looking for a software quality assurance specialist, a sign that Apple could be readying deployment some time soon.

From the job listing:
The iWork team is looking for a software QA engineer to work on the next generation of Desktop, Mobile and Web application/services. This position requires a self-motivated individual with strong problem solving skills who can contribute in a dynamic team environment.
  • Bug reporting and isolation
  • Planning, designing, and executing test cases
  • Ensure the successful delivery of a quality product by performing ad hoc and structured tests on a daily basis
In another interesting post from May 7, a "HiDP Image Specialist" is sought, with the ideal candidate to be tasked with aiding the iWork visual design team in translating graphics to Retina-toting devices. At the very least, the job ad reveals Apple is looking add high-resolution screen support to its productivity suite.

While there has yet to be any official word on a next-gen iWork product, the number of job listings and information therein strongly suggest such a product is in the offing, and could be released in the near future. The current iWork '09, which includes Pages, Numbers and Keynote, was released in 2009, and is seen by some to be long overdue for an upgrade.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 54
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    Does 'next generation' mean our kids will be seeing the next update?
  • Reply 2 of 54

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GTR View Post



    Does 'next generation' mean our kids will be seeing the next update?


    Actually, it means that the next update will happen in the 24th century.

  • Reply 3 of 54
    dagamer34dagamer34 Posts: 494member
    If we're only seeing these job postings now, we aren't going to see an update in the apps for years.
  • Reply 4 of 54
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

    If we're only seeing these job postings now, we aren't going to see an update in the apps for years.


     


    Because… no one on the team right now is physically capable of doing any work? image

  • Reply 5 of 54
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member
    Why even do anything else to iWork? It's already 100% perfect. Right tallest? /s
  • Reply 6 of 54
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

    Why even do anything else to iWork? It's already 100% perfect. Right tallest? /s


     


    The trick to iWork is to include all the piddling little features that no one actually cares about (for the 1/1000th of 1/1000th of a percent that uses them) while retaining the simplicity of the UI and operation for everyone else.


     


    That's hard (and pretty pointless), so Apple has been putting it off.

  • Reply 7 of 54
    pedromartinspedromartins Posts: 1,333member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post





    Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

    Why even do anything else to iWork? It's already 100% perfect. Right tallest? /s


     


    The trick to iWork is to include all the piddling little features that no one actually cares about (for the 1/1000th of 1/1000th of a percent that uses them) while retaining the simplicity of the UI and operation for everyone else.


     


    That's hard (and pretty pointless), so Apple has been putting it off.



    It could load faster;


    it could look better;


    Numbers could be much better (data analysis, statistic, etc);


    etc.

  • Reply 8 of 54
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    The trick to iWork is to include all the piddling little features that no one actually cares about (for the 1/1000th of 1/1000th of a percent that uses them) while retaining the simplicity of the UI and operation for everyone else.


     


    That's hard (and pretty pointless), so Apple has been putting it off.



     


    So ligatures and hyphenation are "piddling little features"?  Interesting.  


     


    I thought they were basic features required of all word processing software.  You know, since it's all about fonts and words and stuff.  image

  • Reply 9 of 54
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,329member
    It could load faster;
    it could look better;
    Numbers could be much better (data analysis, statistic, etc);
    etc.

    Documents could have actual password protection. On iOS devices especially.
  • Reply 10 of 54
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,524member
    andysol wrote: »
    Why even do anything else to iWork? It's already 100% perfect. Right tallest? /s

    The trick to iWork is to include all the piddling little features that no one actually cares about (for the 1/1000th of 1/1000th of a percent that uses them) while retaining the simplicity of the UI and operation for everyone else.

    That's hard (and pretty pointless), so Apple has been putting it off.
    It could load faster;
    it could look better;
    Numbers could be much better (data analysis, statistic, etc);
    etc.

    Add to that, feature parity between iOS and OSX versions.
  • Reply 11 of 54
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,524member
    Duplicate
  • Reply 12 of 54
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,524member
    Duplicate
  • Reply 13 of 54
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,524member
    Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate
  • Reply 14 of 54
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,524member
    andysol wrote: »
    Why even do anything else to iWork? It's already 100% perfect. Right tallest? /s

    The trick to iWork is to include all the piddling little features that no one actually cares about (for the 1/1000th of 1/1000th of a percent that uses them) while retaining the simplicity of the UI and operation for everyone else.

    That's hard (and pretty pointless), so Apple has been putting it off.
    It could load faster;
    it could look better;
    Numbers could be much better (data analysis, statistic, etc);
    etc.

    Add to that, feature parity between iOS and OSX versions.
  • Reply 15 of 54
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,524member
    Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate
  • Reply 16 of 54
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,524member
    Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate Duplicate...

    Sorry this AI site is acting weird... Again... Still!
  • Reply 17 of 54
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,317member
    iWorks is nowhere near perfect.
  • Reply 18 of 54
    christophbchristophb Posts: 1,462member
    Add to that, feature parity between iOS and OSX versions.

    That bears repeating.
  • Reply 19 of 54
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,891member
    This article is a bit misleading, if they are just starting to care about software quality this update is way off in the future. Software quality should be a continuous part of the development process. Atleast in Dave's vision of a perfect world it is.
  • Reply 20 of 54
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,891member
    dagamer34 wrote: »
    If we're only seeing these job postings now, we aren't going to see an update in the apps for years.
    That is my thought exactly! It would be very ass backwards to be hiring quality people at the end of a project.
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