Apple lays out iOS in-app purchase settlement: full refunds and iTunes credits

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  • Reply 21 of 28
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by greenapple3317 View Post



    Once again society/parents not taking the blame for their own kids actions, or "lack of parenting". It' all that simple folks.....kids know right from wrong if taught from the beginning....this is why our society is deteriorating, it's all about blaming someone else for our actions. Step up to the plate parents and be an actual parent for goodness sakes.


    Seriously- step back and try to be objective here.


     


    OK- let's play a game.  Who gets the blame here:


     


    -A $99 In-App purchase in a child's game geared for 3-5 year olds.


    Does the developer get the blame?  Does Apple get a portion of the blame for allowing such a ludicrous amount?


     


    -A 15 minute "free pass" by default after you have entered your password once.  Translation- you buy a game, or download a free app- password is inactive for 15 minutes... again- by default.


    Does Apple get the blame for not putting a safe lock in place?


     


    Developers put these purchases in place to make money- of course- and I would too.  Apple wants their 30% cut- and as a shareholder- I'm glad they get them.  But if we're talking about blame and responsibility- it absolutely falls on Apple and the Developers.  There is absolutely no reason a $99 IAP should be in a children's game, and there is absolutely no reason why there should be a deactivated password for 15 minutes.  Apple now has made it where you are required to enter a password with every purchase by default.  But that wasn't the case prior to this lawsuit.


     


    Apple needs to shoulder some responsibility here.  The bottom line is everyone isn't as smart as you and I when it comes to knowing every in and out of the settings of an iOS device.  That's why the safest default option should have been utilized.  The only reason they had 15 minutes for the password to be deactivated was to make it easier for you to buy more and buy faster.  If you buy that much, that fast- then you should go turn the 15 minute option "off".  Unfortunately, this wasn't the case.

  • Reply 22 of 28
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,205member
    wiggin wrote: »
    Before Apple changed things in response to complaints, yes it was possible to make in app purchases without a password. Your iDevice would remember the password after the first time you used it and would not ask for it again for future purchase, in app or otherwise.

    But they did have restrictions for in app since the iPad came out. Plus there was a timer. After something like ten minutes you had to out in your password again. It didn't remember it for all time

    And this funny thing called not using your iDevices as babysitters.
  • Reply 23 of 28
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,205member
    andysol wrote: »
    Every time along the journey this story has been posted, there are always a dozen or so people who hop on and blame the parents.  Then once the other posters get on and educate them on what happened and why- they always change their opinion.

    It some cases it was the parents fault. Like the woman that told her kids the account password. Or the guy that did the same and then didn't pay attention to card statements for three months.

    And given the amount of press that this issue has had, including the presence of restrictions at this point it is the parents fault for not educating themselves before handing tech to a kid and turning their backs. Plus just reading the information about what their kids want to download before putting in the password because its free. In a few cases you had five year olds getting games rated for adults.

    And make no mistake, Apple has not declared guilt. They just don't want to bother with the whole thing and its cheaper to settle than deal with the court costs. But you can bet they will have all kinds of restrictions to avoid scams etc. And don't be shocked if new info comes up when you log into an apple id reminding folks of those restrictions and that there are no refunds.
  • Reply 24 of 28
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,205member
    philboogie wrote: »
    $1.99 to remove ads? I buy that.

    What's interesting is that that may not qualify as 'consumable game currency' for the settlement. It would seem that they are only counting buys that relate to adding turns, one time use power ups, speeding up repairs etc. not turning off ads for life, additional game levels and similar.

    Also you only get to claim charges for the first 45 days. After that, forget it. So the jerk dad in England that had his son charged with credit card fraud for charges over 90 days is out a full refund. Then again it might be hard for him to prove that he didn't give his son the password which is also a condition of the settlement.
  • Reply 25 of 28
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member
    charlituna wrote: »
    But they did have restrictions for in app since the iPad came out. Plus there was a timer. After something like ten minutes you had to out in your password again. It didn't remember it for all time

    And this funny thing called not using your iDevices as babysitters.

    It's already widely known what your opinion is on the matter. It's also well known that you don't have kids. How about you just sit this one out and leave it up to those who actually have experience raising kids talk, because you really don't know what you're talking about.

    Edited to add:

    The constant call of non-parents is "using your iDevices as babysitters". I just feel like we should deconstruct that. Someone who doesn't have kids thinks "I'll never use a device to babysit my kid". That's noble.
    But in reality- you have to cook dinner. And you're going to have your kid watch 20 minutes of TV. You're going to get your hair cut, and you're going to have your kid play a game or read a book on the iPad. Now what if they just color on paper instead of the iPad- does that really matter in terms of them learning creativity? So "babysitting" has always occurred. Whereas it used to be coloring or reading, it is now Angry Birds. Now I choose to not have my child play any "games" like Angry birds or things that build zero skills. But coloring, storytelling, ABC Videos, etc I absolutely use. So ya... my kid gets "baby sat" using an iPad on occasion.

    So while your future 4 year old is going to twiddle its thumbs while you get your haircut and sit at the dinner table patiently while you're cooking dinner, the rest of us will live in reality.
  • Reply 26 of 28
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post



    But they did have restrictions for in app since the iPad came out. Plus there was a timer. After something like ten minutes you had to out in your password again. It didn't remember it for all time



    And this funny thing called not using your iDevices as babysitters.

     

    I don't think anyone here is arguing that the parents are completely absolved of at least some responsibility, but a manufacturer also has a responsibiltiy to make a safe products, whether that's safety from physical or financial harm. It actually goes to one of my big pet peeves. That is of the trend to make figuring out how to use these devices a big cat-and-mouse search for hidden buttons and features.



    If my devices says "enter your password to make this purchase", would it be reasonable to assume that a good number of people think that the password is only for THAT particular purchase and that you'd be asked again for the next purchase? Or even worse, how many people do think even know how to log out of their iTunes account after making a purchase? Nearly all websites that you have to log into have a big and obvious "log out" link at the top of their pages. So assuming I know that I'll stay logged in, where do I go to log out before I hand it to my kid to play a game? I'm not saying they did it with malicious intent, but Apple didn't make it easy for people to be: a) aware of what was going on, and b) able to figure out how to manage it.



    And this is also one of the dangers of Apple insisting on curating the App Store. They risk taking on some of the responsibility for the ethical behavior of the developers of the apps they sell.
  • Reply 27 of 28
    You know I was one of those parents way back in the summer 2012 that had this happen. I honestly had no idea you could block in app purchases because I barely used my phone. So when my child asked for a game I put my password in & download it. Hours later ( at that time apple sent you an itemized receipt almost as soon as a purchase was made ) I saw what she was doing. I contacted apple immediately and not only did they walk me through placing a pin (which at the time was a generic 1111 or 0000) but they refunded the money and said that if it happens again I would be liable for the charges. Note taken and it has not happened since.
    Why do we in America feel the need to always sue?
  • Reply 28 of 28
    Originally Posted by lizard923 View Post

    Why do we in America feel the need to always sue?

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