NPD: Apple's MacBook Air most popular thin-and-light notebook with 56 percent share of market

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 30
    tribalogicaltribalogical Posts: 1,182member
    The MB Air is the only "ultra" that makes any sense to me. It's my next computer purchase, later this month%u2026 13", stock 256GB version. The new models really take it into perfect price/performance territory. Looking forward to it!
  • Reply 22 of 30
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,685member


    The Air is a great product, and it competes on price, which Apple does do when it has a chance of winning.

  • Reply 23 of 30
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,471member
    ifij775 wrote: »
    I've been pleasantly surprised by the price comparison of the new MBA to the Wintel ultrabooks.

    Not to mention a MBA is in fact multiple computers in one (as is any other modern Mac) as it can run almost any operating system in VMware as well as its own. Anyone buying any other make of computer is nuts. I have an external drive with a dozen VMs and can fire up anything from Windows 8.1 to OS X 10.9 Server in seconds. By the way, the server works great on one core in a VM with virtually no impact on the mother OS even when serving up HD video on a web site accessed via the internet using real domain name/DNS (i.e. not just .local).

    As to Windows, the great thing about running Windows this way is the ability to make a back up of the initial installation in seconds and have it there when Windows does its inevitable slow down. No mess no fuss, ditch it and fire up a fresh version in seconds. Try that on a crappy Wintel PC. Apple hardware totally rocks!
  • Reply 24 of 30
    superbasssuperbass Posts: 688member


    None of the AI or CNET links actually go to the NPD report, and it doesn't seem to be available at NPD.com


     


    Tough to see what the criteria was for "thin and light" notebook would be, also whether hybrid tablet/notebooks would be included in the study.


     


    Really, how you define "thin and light" would make a big difference. If the max thickness/weight was set at the MBA's specs, for example, there wouldn't be much competition, since there aren't really more than a couple competing products. Add a centimeter and half a kilo and there are all of a sudden a lot more products that might make the study. Add "2-in-1s" and again, the numbers change.


     


    Random numbers with no methodology/description of product group backing them up are pretty random...

  • Reply 25 of 30
    pendergastpendergast Posts: 1,358member
    superbass wrote: »
    None of the AI or CNET links actually go to the NPD report, and it doesn't seem to be available at NPD.com

    Tough to see what the criteria was for "thin and light" notebook would be, also whether hybrid tablet/notebooks would be included in the study.

    Really, how you define "thin and light" would make a big difference. If the max thickness/weight was set at the MBA's specs, for example, there wouldn't be much competition, since there aren't really more than a couple competing products. Add a centimeter and half a kilo and there are all of a sudden a lot more products that might make the study. Add "2-in-1s" and again, the numbers change.

    Random numbers with no methodology/description of product group backing them up are pretty random...

    Pretty sure it's comparing them to the so-called "Ultrabooks".
  • Reply 26 of 30
    aaronjaaronj Posts: 1,595member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    Not to mention a MBA is in fact multiple computers in one (as is any other modern Mac) as it can run almost any operating system in VMware as well as its own. Anyone buying any other make of computer is nuts. I have an external drive with a dozen VMs and can fire up anything from Windows 8.1 to OS X 10.9 Server in seconds. By the way, the server works great on one core in a VM with virtually no impact on the mother OS even when serving up HD video on a web site accessed via the internet using real domain name/DNS (i.e. not just .local).


     


    See, this is a great point that often gets overlooked in reviews or in the tech "press".  I don't have an MBA, but on my iMac (or my MacBook, for that matter) I can run OSX, Windows, Linux, whatever.  And it's easy-peasy.  This seems to me like a big advantage.

  • Reply 27 of 30
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    I need speed. I like to game, and I do graphics and 3D work.

    I need a big screen, for the graphics work and for programming.

    I need to travel but not often.

    And I STILL choose a MacBook Air every time. The one-hand grab-and-go convenience (even just across the house) is so nice that I took a week to get used to the loss of my iMac's speed and screen, and never looked back. Great battery life, and I accept the need to crank the detail down on games.

    I did, however, switch from a 13" to an 11".

    P.S. Have you ever picked up one of those cheap MacBook Air clones? Despite the poor battery life (and often lack of lighted keys) they are as heavy as a brick. And are made of cheap, crackable painted plastic instead of real metal! It's pretty horrifying after using a real Air. (Which is also cheaper in the end: longer usable life means buying fewer of them, and each one holds great resale value. To say nothing of lower support costs.)
  • Reply 28 of 30
    psitthipopsitthipo Posts: 33member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Market research firm NPD estimates that Apple's MacBook Air grabbed 56 percent of the U.S. thin-and-light notebook market in the first five months of 2013, according to CNet. The remainder of the market was split between assorted Ultrabook manufacturers.


     


    If you narrow it down to just the "thin-and-light" notebook market, then obviously the MacBook Air is going to be one of the top. I'm more interested in knowing how it  sits in the entire laptop market.

  • Reply 29 of 30
    therfmantherfman Posts: 52member


    Deleted

  • Reply 30 of 30
    Sounds like apple is hitting it out of the park on multiple fronts. My company has already approved the purchase of the new Mac Pro when it comes out in a few months.
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