Apple's Phil Schiller sells $18.6M in AAPL stock, SVP Dan Riccio sells $1.9M

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 30
    Cramer sez, insider selling not a big deal, insider buying is bullish
  • Reply 22 of 30

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Corrections View Post



    You could research how much stock these guys have left, and how much is in the form of options that have not yet been exercised.



    They didn't buy stock at $400. They got stock grants and/or options with a low strike price, meaning they could still profit tremendously by selling their stock when it was $380.


     


    You can see what they have here --


    http://www.sec.gov/cgi-bin/own-disp?action=getissuer&CIK=0000320193


     


    And other Apple related reports here --


    http://www.sec.gov/cgi-bin/browse-edgar?CIK=0000320193&action=getcompany

  • Reply 23 of 30
    I'll there's nothing much to see here. Probably being sold for tax reasons.
  • Reply 24 of 30
    Why on Earth wouldn't they at least wait until the new iPhone and/or iPads release and the stock subsequently goes up for a period?
  • Reply 25 of 30

    Originally Posted by xjyamaha View Post


    Why on Earth wouldn't they at least wait until the new iPhone and/or iPads release and the stock subsequently goes up for a period?


     


    Because stock historically plummets after keynotes.

  • Reply 26 of 30
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,564member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by xjyamaha View Post



    Why on Earth wouldn't they at least wait until the new iPhone and/or iPads release and the stock subsequently goes up for a period?


    Because it can be construed as insider trading by the SEC. Therefore, companies like Apple have dates in which employees can not buy or sell AAPL stocks. There are also windows in which they can exercise their options or vested stocks. And these windows are often weeks before or after any announcements that may cause big movements in the stock. Not only that, these employees must put their trade order in weeks or months in advance. They can not trade their shares in the open market. They can only set the date that it's to be traded, not the price.   


     


    That's why when people see insiders sell at a low point in the stock and wonder why didn't they wait. Or maybe think the insider knows something and is dumping their shares now because the stock is going lower. But the reality is that the insider had no idea what price he's going to sell at because he had to place the sell order in months before and only during a certain window. Otherwise the SEC (and shareholders) can make accusation of insider trading.


     


    The other point is that the tax owed on vested stocks and options is due once they become vested. Not when they are sold. And if the stock value (when vested) is going to be a big chunk of the yearly earnings, the IRS wants quarterly payments on the estimated tax, instead waiting till April to pay. So employees often put in a sell order in the quarter their stock become vested to pay the tax.  

  • Reply 27 of 30
    Shows how much I know about stocks. Had no idea.
    davidw wrote: »
    Because it can be construed as insider trading by the SEC. Therefore, companies like Apple have dates in which employees can not buy or sell AAPL stocks. There are also windows in which they can exercise their options or vested stocks. And these windows are often weeks before or after any announcements that may cause big movements in the stock. Not only that, these employees must put their trade order in weeks or months in advance. They can not trade their shares in the open market. They can only set the date that it's to be traded, not the price.   

    That's why when people see insiders sell at a low point in the stock and wonder why didn't they wait. Or maybe think the insider knows something and is dumping their shares now because the stock is going lower. But the reality is that the insider had no idea what price he's going to sell at because he had to place the sell order in months before and only during a certain window. Otherwise the SEC (and shareholders) can make accusation of insider trading.

    The other point is that the tax owed on vested stocks and options is due once they become vested. Not when they are sold. And if the stock value (when vested) is going to be a big chunk of the yearly earnings, the IRS wants quarterly payments on the estimated tax, instead waiting till April to pay. So employees often put in a sell order in the quarter their stock become vested to pay the tax.  

    Shows how much I know about stocks. Had no idea.
    Because stock historically plummets after keynotes.

    I know Apple stock has increased following releases.....
  • Reply 28 of 30
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member

    Originally Posted by xjyamaha View Post


    I know Apple stock has increased following releases.....




    When? I could probably count the number of times that has happened but certainly can't the number of times it has fallen.

  • Reply 29 of 30
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,564member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post




    When? I could probably count the number of times that has happened but certainly can't the number of times it has fallen.



    That depends on the time frame. If you're comparing the price of AAPL the day before a keynote and the day after, then more often than not, it will be lower the day after.(At least that's the way it seems to me also) That's because Apple rarely meets all the hype and rumors built up before the keynote. But the further out you go, the better the chances are that AAPL will be higher after the keynote than when you bought it. (Barring some unforeseen bad news in between.) Buy AAPL a few weeks before a keynote and chances are good that AAPL will still be higher than when you bought it after it drops the day after the keynote. For instance, if AAPL drops 2% after a keynote, it might have ran up 4% from when you bought it a few weeks ago. Most traders would sell right before a keynote to maximize gain. But for investors, we're use to it, it's just part of the AAPL roller coaster ride. 

  • Reply 30 of 30
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,472member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Good grief, this is nothing new. Also, Larry Page, Sergy Brin an Eric Schmdit sold a shitload of Google stock recently. Does that mean Google is doomed?


     


    No...everyone else is. image

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