Apple now requires Apple IDs to schedule Genius Bar appointments online

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CustomTB View Post





    Can't you still walk in and wait? For hours?

    Doesn't sound like "guaranteed service" to me. More like "possibly, you might maybe get service if we can find some small amount of time for you".

  • Reply 22 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

     

    Doesn't sound like "guaranteed service" to me. More like "possibly, you might maybe get service if we can find some small amount of time for you".


     

    Too true, "Please fix my iDevice" would soon become "Refund please, ta very much"

  • Reply 23 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,141member
    "Apple now requires Apple IDs [or soon, their finger print'] to schedule Genius Bar appointments online" ... Fixed it. :)
  • Reply 24 of 35
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,141member
    glnf wrote: »
    And I see you are new to the world. Only because a company (or a state for that matter) has collected a massive amount of personal information and not used against anyone yet does not guaranty that they are not going to do that exact thing in the future. Apple today does not have to be Apple in 10 years. But the information collected remains in their hands. Apple could pass on sensitive info (think NSA or FBI) and it can just be nicked from Apples servers. That all happened before. Suddenly someone is after you for illegally downloading music or stretching software licenses. You being investigated because someone from your address book deals in drugs or  you start having a hard time renting a place because something flags up, ... So to force users to register for every little thing is not very sympathetic from Apples side.

    I wonder exactly how much personal information Apple really keep? I honestly don't know but maybe someone here does. Given they, unlike Google et al, have no financial interest in selling the sort of data you worry about, why would they retain it in the first place? Of course they have proof of who you are tied to credit card information, that is part of living in the 21st Century, but beyond that what would they need?
  • Reply 25 of 35
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,278member
    I wonder exactly how much personal information Apple really keep? I honestly don't know but maybe someone here does. Given they, unlike Google et al, have no financial interest in selling the sort of data you worry about, why would they retain it in the first place? Of course they have proof of who you are tied to credit card information, that is part of living in the 21st Century, but beyond that what would they need?

    Google has as much financial interest in selling personal data as Apple does. ;) . . . and both collect personal data and use "anonymized" versions of it for targeted ads on behest of the companies they place advertisements for. Besides the ability to see/modify/delete the types of information stored, which only one of the two currently offers, the only real difference that I know of is scale. Apple's currently putting in much more effort on the advertising side than they previously have. They look serious now, and to be effective for the companies they represent they need as much personal data (ie income. interests, work/home location, type of employment, family demographics, etc) as they can collect, anonymized of course except for the finance part.
  • Reply 26 of 35
    I applaud Apple's requirement for Apple ID's for Genius Bar appointments.

    In China, certain scammers have monopolized Genius Bar appointments by making multiple appointments to fill up the schedule. Then no one else can schedule an appointment. They then SELL their Genius Bar appointments to those who want one.

    This new requirement will stop this scam.
  • Reply 27 of 35
    torvalus wrote: »
    While it would cut down on scalping, I think the true purpose is to draw more users into the Apple ecosystem. This benefits Apple in the obvious ways such as being able to sell content and improve loyalty, but also in a more subtle Google-like fashion.

    It is highly unlikely that this information would ever go near anything advertising related. Too much risk of law suits for privacy violations.

    If anything I think its a step in the direction of getting rid of some of the minutia steps before folks come in like checking if they have an iCloud account, is backups turned on, if not instructing them how to back up before coming in. Also getting details about what is going on, advising them of warranty status etc.

    Even just things like making sure the appointment is set for the right type of tech, showing them options at more than one store if they have several in the area. Warning them about being late etc also.

    Just like there is that training portal for folks that buy into that program, perhaps customers need a Genius portal where they can and are strongly encouraged to register their products and can find instructional help, trouble shooting for various issues and if needed outside help. This could be a step in that way.
  • Reply 28 of 35
    djd214 wrote: »
    Employees sometimes fill appointments up so they don't have to work as hard at the end of the night. This also prevents this from happening. Before this, fake appointments were made all the time. Although making a fake Apple ID isn't difficult, since you can make a new account with a new email but I guess it will help.

    In store employees have other systems to book appointments that might not require an Apple ID. So this scheme you are talking about might still be possible.

    That said, it is likely that managers etc are able to see where and how appointments are booked, perhaps even to knowing if it was an in store or out of store computer. And how many appointments don't show. They would adjust scheduling accordingly because why have five folks working when the traffic only needs three. So such games could backfire. Especially when they see a pattern and sort out the scam and possible fire folks for it.
  • Reply 29 of 35
    haarhaar Posts: 563member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Google has as much financial interest in selling personal data as Apple does. ;) . . . and both collect personal data and use "anonymized" versions of it for targeted ads on behest of the companies they place advertisements for. Besides the ability to see/modify/delete the types of information stored, which only one of the two currently offers, the only real difference that I know of is scale. Apple's currently putting in much more effort on the advertising side than they previously have. They look serious now, and to be effective for the companies they represent they need as much personal data (ie income. interests, work/home location, type of employment, family demographics, etc) as they can collect, anonymized of course except for the finance part.




    Obvious ! so why post ?(also applies to this post lol) Googles WHOLE company is about posting ads which are assured from the personal data that they anonymized because it is worth more than Singular data...

    if Apple had to survive on AD Revenue Like Google does, Apple would no longer exist....

    so Gatorguy did you post this on your coffee break at Google, because they stopped the 20% time perk???... (Sorry for the ad hominem attack but I couldn't resist)
  • Reply 30 of 35

    Gosh, the entitlement is just UGLY.



     

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by helicoil View Post

     

    "Please fix my iDevice" would soon become "Refund please, ta very much"


     

    So, you'd want a refund because you're upset that you couldn't use the extremely popular and free service that requires a reservation, because you didn't book a reservation? You'd probably get your refund. Doesn't mean you should if you haven't tried calling applecare or using their new support website or attempted to get warranty support from an authorized apple service provider (3rd party). 

     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

     

    Doesn't sound like "guaranteed service" to me. More like "possibly, you might maybe get service if we can find some small amount of time for you".




     


    What makes you think you're "guaranteed service"? The only way to guarantee support is to make a reservation. "A limited number of walk-in appointments are also available."

  • Reply 31 of 35
    charlituna wrote: »
    In store employees have other systems to book appointments that might not require an Apple ID. So this scheme you are talking about might still be possible.

    That said, it is likely that managers etc are able to see where and how appointments are booked, perhaps even to knowing if it was an in store or out of store computer. And how many appointments don't show. They would adjust scheduling accordingly because why have five folks working when the traffic only needs three. So such games could backfire. Especially when they see a pattern and sort out the scam and possible fire folks for it.

    I am speaking from experience. Managers are clueless about the family room and don't look at appointments that closely. The employee system show if it is booked by an employee that is why they would go online and book for the site with a fake name and email. How can you monitor that?
  • Reply 32 of 35
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,657member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Google has as much financial interest in selling personal data as Apple does. ;) . . . and both collect personal data and use "anonymized" versions of it for targeted ads on behest of the companies they place advertisements for. Besides the ability to see/modify/delete the types of information stored, which only one of the two currently offers, the only real difference that I know of is scale. Apple's currently putting in much more effort on the advertising side than they previously have. They look serious now, and to be effective for the companies they represent they need as much personal data (ie income. interests, work/home location, type of employment, family demographics, etc) as they can collect, anonymized of course except for the finance part.

    Right on cue. You know we mean selling access to every bit of data about you.
  • Reply 33 of 35
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,278member
    I wonder exactly how much personal information Apple really keep? I honestly don't know but maybe someone here does.
    No one bothered with an answer so perhaps they don't know. This is what Apple specifically says they collect and store. Some of it is sharable outside of Apple itself, some is not and some is only sharable if anonymized or under a legal order to do so according to their privacy policy.

    -Your Apple ID user name, real name, mailing address, email address, phone number, contact preferences, and credit card info.
    -Information on others you know from your use of the "share" button and gift certificates, and again generally basic things like name, address, phone number etc.
    -Your device's unique ID number
    -What language you speak and the area you live in.
    -What you do for a living
    -Your contacts
    -Siri usage (disassociated from your user ID after 6 months)
    -Where you use your Apple device
    -Read/write and purchase activity on iCloud, iTunes and Apple websites
    -Other misc website visit information collected via cookies and beacons

    Probably other stuff but this is only from Apple's mention in their privacy policy.
  • Reply 34 of 35

    Blame and deflect, blame and deflect.

  • Reply 35 of 35
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,205member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    No one bothered with an answer so perhaps they don't know. This is what Apple specifically says they collect and store. Some of it is sharable outside of Apple itself, some is not and some is only sharable if anonymized or under a legal order to do so according to their privacy policy.

    -Your Apple ID user name, real name, mailing address, email address, phone number, contact preferences, and credit card info.

    Which only comes up if you use that Id to buy anything.

    So if you are that paranoid make up an id just for booking appointments and never use it for anything else.
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