Apple expected to offer more affordable 'budget' iMac next year

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  • Reply 101 of 200
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    I remember there being Blu-ray playback software released for OS X a few years ago, at this point.

     

    As to authorship, doesn’t FCPX do it now? DVD Studio Pro does, but that’s discontinued.


     

    An Adobe Premiere Pro CS and CC includes Blu-Ray authoring and support for Mac Blu-Ray hardware.

  • Reply 102 of 200
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

    [who?][citation needed]

     


     

    I burn DVD discs on occasion from my MacBook Air.

    Anyone who wants to burn CDs or DVDs can still do it on any Mac. It's a complete non-issue. More FUD from people who don't have a clue about how Apple products work.

  • Reply 103 of 200
    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post



    An Adobe Premiere Pro CS and CC includes Blu-Ray authoring and support for Mac Blu-Ray hardware.


     

    Right! Thanks.

     

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

    I burn DVD discs on occasion from my MacBook Air. Anyone who wants to burn CDs or DVDs can still do it on any Mac.


     

    Here’s what I think about discs at this point (let’s call it my opinion 2010-present): If you really need to do it, plug a SuperDrive into an AirPort Extreme/Time Capsule and burn/rip from/to any Mac in your house. Simple!

  • Reply 104 of 200

    Unless the price is $599 or less it won't really seem like a budget machine to most people in PC land. Like I said in a different thread, the Mac Mini base model should be priced around $349 as is. Adding a keyboard, mouse, and monitor would put it around $599 in a package deal. Units with similar features from HP cost that much. They have an all in one for $529.99.

     

    Making the cases out of stamped steel or plastic instead of blocks of aluminum would be more efficient. Just because they do that for a low end model doesn't mean they must do it for their expensive models. It won't dilute the brand. It will expand it.

  • Reply 105 of 200
    winterwinter Posts: 1,238member
    $349 would garner probably a Pentium mini. I think maybe $499 is as low as they might be willing to go.
  • Reply 106 of 200
    jexusjexus Posts: 373member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Winter View Post



    $349 would garner probably a Pentium mini. I think maybe $499 is as low as they might be willing to go.

    Hypothetically speaking(Because we have pretty good reason to believe such a thing will not happen, damn analysts).

     

    i3's are pretty cheap and are a decently popular choice for average computing and HTPC duties. A little under, around, or over $100.  $450-ish or a little lower could probably act as a sort of safety net.

     

    Again, Hypothetically.

  • Reply 107 of 200
    winterwinter Posts: 1,238member
    jexus wrote: »
    Hypothetically speaking(Because we have pretty good reason to believe such a thing will not happen, damn analysts).

    i3's are pretty cheap and are a decently popular choice for average computing and HTPC duties. A little under, around, or over $100.  $450-ish or a little lower could probably act as a sort of safety net.

    Again, Hypothetically.

    Makes sense. Me, I don't want an i3. I know I don't even push my mini to the limits as is, for longevity sake I am looking at i7 only either dual or quad but possibly quad. I'm not sure what the future of the mini is after this year. I would love for Apple to keep making it but obviously with sales in a slump, who knows what will happen. Much like they did with the rMBP during the NBA finals, I would love a commercial during a football or baseball game.

    "Introducing the all new Mac mini with flash storage and fits right in the corner of your desk starting at just $499."
  • Reply 108 of 200
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Competing with Windows computers on price is not the way to go. You'll end up with a computer that's built poorly, like the other computers in that price bracket.

    I've bought Windows machines, but it's almost exclusively from the business lines. The two times I've bought the consumer lines, I've deeply regretted, and I still haven't found any of them worth buying.
  • Reply 109 of 200
    jexusjexus Posts: 373member

    Yea, never meant to come off insinuating that they should or such. I myself see zero reason for them to do so.

    Why I emphasized hypothetically with the little note :3

  • Reply 110 of 200
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,827member
    Why don’t idiots understand what the Mac Mini is? Is it the shape that throws them off? 

    Realistically it isn't a budget model.
  • Reply 111 of 200
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,827member
    The problem with the iMac has nothing to do with price, they could sell the thing for a dollar and I wouldn't buy the machine. Apple apparently configured the machine for some idealized virtual customer that they feel is an idiot with limited needs and a compromised understanding of technology. Apple can try to spur sales with a lower cost model but if it is no more desirable than the current machines I don't think they will bag that many more gullible people than they do now.

    The next iMac needs the input of a real user, a real engineer and a real repair technician. As it is now, iMac lets each of these people down.
  • Reply 112 of 200
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member
    brlawyer wrote: »

    You just gonna ignore my rebuttal where you were proved completely wrong?

    Again- when att, sprint, and the other phone providers released that the 5c is the 2nd best selling phone they have- 2nd to the 5s only- how is that a failure? 1st and 2nd place is failing? HTC is begging to "fail" like apple.
  • Reply 113 of 200
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member
    wizard69 wrote: »
    The problem with the iMac has nothing to do with price, they could sell the thing for a dollar and I wouldn't buy the machine. Apple apparently configured the machine for some idealized virtual customer that they feel is an idiot with limited needs and a compromised understanding of technology. Apple can try to spur sales with a lower cost model but if it is no more desirable than the current machines I don't think they will bag that many more gullible people than they do now.

    The next iMac needs the input of a real user, a real engineer and a real repair technician. As it is now, iMac lets each of these people down.

    $1? Idiotic comment...
  • Reply 114 of 200
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,827member
    lkrupp wrote: »
    Where did you get your time machine because you are living in the past. There is NO market for the device you "built." Why does the poser geek crowd think they are the majority?

    On the contrary there is a sizable market for such machines. Apple may or may not give us an alternative in the new MacPro but that tune has yet to be played. The fact is people often need capabilities beyond what Apple builds into their all in one machines. Yes technology is changing and the Mac Pro might be a better solution but the Mac Pro isn't the right solution for everybody.
  • Reply 115 of 200
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,827member
    jeffdm wrote: »
    Competing with Windows computers on price is not the way to go. You'll end up with a computer that's built poorly, like the other computers in that price bracket.
    This is a lot of BS, it would be easy for Apple to deliver a cheaper laptop and maintain quality. Quality gets engineered in.
    I've bought Windows machines, but it's almost exclusively from the business lines. The two times I've bought the consumer lines, I've deeply regretted, and I still haven't found any of them worth buying.

    And how much did those Windows machines cost? Remember until iPad most tablets weren't worth buying.
  • Reply 116 of 200
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,827member
    andysol wrote: »
    $1? Idiotic comment...

    What is idiotic is buying a desktop machine that is glued together and isn't serviceable at all without un gluing it. Especially when the serviceable items have no external access at all.
  • Reply 117 of 200
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post



    Competing with Windows computers on price is not the way to go. You'll end up with a computer that's built poorly, like the other computers in that price bracket.



    I've bought Windows machines, but it's almost exclusively from the business lines. The two times I've bought the consumer lines, I've deeply regretted, and I still haven't found any of them worth buying.



    My 2009 HP that came with Vista arrived with a defect in the board. I got a free replacement. I didn't have to pay for any of the shipping charges. The hardware has worked flawlessly ever since then. Vista was garbage. After the warranty period I dual booted it. Eventually Vista just stopped working and I wiped the drive and put different GNU/Linux distributions on it until I settled on just one. It is a great machine that cost under $350 with several card readers, six USB ports, and a DVD drive. Of course it is much bigger than a Mini or an iMac but everything is accessable and I can add more drives and other peripherals if I want them. I might even swap the motherboard and buy a newer faster chip set for less than $200. My OS is always up to date with the latest and greatest versions of programs. It is more intuitive than OS X and is even faster than my Mac Book with the superior processor.

     

    Don't slam the other manufacturers so hard. Sure their quality isn't always the best but millions of people have computers that give them no problems at all. I owned a Gateway for six years before a fan on a power supply failed. It couldn't easily be replaced because it was a proprietary size built-in with the power supply. It didn't matter because I wanted to buy my first Apple machine at that time. It was just time to let it go.

     

    My Mac Book battery expanded due to a known defect. Apple refused to replace it until they got a report from the Consumer Product Safety Commission that I had filed about it. Then Apple sent me to a repair facility where it was photographed. A week later I had a new battery. It worked for a while but died within six months. It wouldn't take a charge. Apples customer service just didn't give me great service after the sale.

     

    I'm not the typical average computer user so my experience is not in the middle of the bell curve. Still my opinion probably would have counted in the Apple universe fifteen years ago when Apple catered to the outliers. Now my wants and the wants of many posting here just don't seem to count toward the bottom line anymore. Building my own desktop with the features I want is seeming like the way to go these days. I've never done it but I'm willing to try. Perhaps others here should consider it too. It's looking like I'll buy the Acer C720 to be my next laptop. SSD, USB 3, HDMI, SD card reader, 1366 X 768 screen resolution, all for $249 with a three year warranty.

  • Reply 118 of 200
    Budget iMac coming soon, right after Apple releases the budget iPhone....
  • Reply 119 of 200
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

    Realistically it isn't a budget model.

     

    I can certainly see where you’re coming from with that, but it is Apple’s budget model. It’s not Apple’s fault if you’ve not the budget for it, is all.

     

    Again, “Only a rich person can afford cheap windows.” Except in this instance, the ‘W’ is capitalized! <img class=" src="http://forums-files.appleinsider.com/images/smilies//lol.gif" /> 

  • Reply 120 of 200
    dsddsd Posts: 184member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post





    Why don't you try to respond with arguments instead of insults?

     

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