Hands-on: Okidokeys' iOS-connected door lock and "smart keys"

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Throwing its hat into the growing ring of "smart home" products, Okidokeys is bringing a line of wireless door lock devices to market that promise remote access, unique "keys" and highly customizable configurations.

Okidokeys


With its lineup of devices, Okidokeys is entering the burgeoning "smart home" segment, which looks to automate everyday tasks to simplify the lives of users.

Much like the Kwikset's Kevo lock, Okidokeys' solution is built around a central deadbolt lock. The battery-powered main unit slides over existing mechanisms, making installation a simple procedure.

Unlike most smart locks on the market, the Okidokeys platform adopts multiple communications protocols, including Bluetooth 4.0, near-field communications (NFC), radio frequency identification (RFID) and crypto acoustic credential (CAC) technology. The system also hooks up to the Web via a proprietary bridge called the Okidokeys Virtual network.

Perhaps most interesting are the virtual keys provided as part of the system. Users can lock/unlock remotely from iOS and Android apps (with the Okidokeys bridge), as well as what looks to be a Web client. At the point of entry, however, the outdoor Smart Reader accepts signals from non-smartphones, keychain tags, keycards and special bracelets and watches.

Okidokeys


As with Kevo, Okidokeys allows users to grant and revoke access via provided software, while the system will send out push notifications when a key has been used to open a door.

Okidokeys starts at $179 for the lock unit, then moves up to a $229 package which includes three Smart-Wristbands, three Smart-Cards, three Smart-Key chains, and a limited-edition Smart-Watch. Finally, the Okidokeys Connect-pack includes the bridge.

In addition, the company is rolling out add-on locks and activation mechanisms for garage doors and gates.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 1,819member
    Why you no put video?
  • Reply 2 of 15
    joshajosha Posts: 901member

    The last thing I need; is battery requirements for door locks and my locked doors exposed to hacking.

    On the other hand a $25 door lock break in device from eBay could be a next business.

  • Reply 3 of 15
    don't be fooled, your traditional door locks are more prone to hacking, something i found out using the glory of youtube, a hairpin (5c) and a few minutes on my own front door
  • Reply 4 of 15
    asterionasterion Posts: 107member
    Seriously... "Okidokeys"? As in okeydokey??

    Surely the result of what must have been one of the worst brainstorming sessions in history!
  • Reply 5 of 15
    lilgto64lilgto64 Posts: 1,147member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoshA View Post

     

    The last thing I need; is battery requirements for door locks and my locked doors exposed to hacking.

    On the other hand a $25 door lock break in device from eBay could be a next business.


     

    I doubt most people would have these installed on a solid glass doors - meaning that from outside there would be no way to know that such a device was installed. If you search on lock pics you will find that most types of locks have some sort of tool or device available for defeating them. 

     

    I am surprised someone hasn't put on their tin foil hat and claimed that the NSA or DHS is backing all these type of electronic locks as it would make the job of entering a building much easier. Then again it all depends on whether you are trying to be stealthy when you break in. 

  • Reply 6 of 15
    nhtnht Posts: 4,429member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoshA View Post

     

    The last thing I need; is battery requirements for door locks and my locked doors exposed to hacking.


     

    I have electronic locks and they are awesome.  Batter changes about once a year with physical backup (aka key) in case of failure.

  • Reply 7 of 15
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,458member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asterion View Post



    Seriously... "Okidokeys"? As in okeydokey??



    Surely the result of what must have been one of the worst brainstorming sessions in history!

     

    After many beers...

  • Reply 8 of 15

    Why can't any of these companies make a double cylinder version?  My doors have windows in them, so a single cylinder deadbolt is pretty much worthless because all someone has to do is break the window and they can open the door.

     

    I do like that this one can be controlled remotely from a phone if you get the bridge.  That would be very handy in cases like the HVAC repairman or plumber is coming to work on something, you don't have to leave the door unlocked or give them a key.  Just have them call you when they get there and you can unlock the door from wherever you are.  That was a big omission from KEVO in my opinion.

  • Reply 9 of 15
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    I do like that this one can be controlled remotely from a phone if you get the bridge.  That would be very handy in cases like the HVAC repairman or plumber is coming to work on something, you don't have to leave the door unlocked or give them a key.  Just have them call you when they get there and you can unlock the door from wherever you are.  That was a big omission from KEVO in my opinion.

    You would do that; unlock the door for maintenance people, remotely?
  • Reply 10 of 15
    nht wrote: »
    I have electronic locks and they are awesome.  Batter changes about once a year with physical backup (aka key) in case of failure.

    Which electronic locks do you use? Are they compatible with both iPhone and android phones?
  • Reply 11 of 15
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    You would do that; unlock the door for maintenance people, remotely?

     

    Definitely. As it is right now I have to leave the door unlocked all day so they can get in.

     

    I've had workers replace 2 exterior doors, install a new water heater, work on the water softener, service the furnace, etc. all in the last 3 or 4 years, and each time we have to just leave the door unlocked all day while we are at work so they can get in to do the work.  I work about a half hour away from home so I can't just run home quick to let them in, and my wife works at a school so she can't just up and leave or go in late etc.

     

    We live in a rural area outside a small town (less than 2000 people).  These are all small local businesses/contractors doing the work.  If they were to steal stuff etc. word would spread real quick and they would be out of business in no time.  Likewise if someone were to lie about a company stealing that word would travel too, and those people would find themselves without anyone willing to do work for them.

  • Reply 12 of 15
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    philboogie wrote: »
    You would do that; unlock the door for maintenance people, remotely?

    Definitely. As it is right now I have to leave the door unlocked all day so they can get in.

    I've had workers replace 2 exterior doors, install a new water heater, work on the water softener, service the furnace, etc. all in the last 3 or 4 years, and each time we have to just leave the door unlocked all day while we are at work so they can get in to do the work.  I work about a half hour away from home so I can't just run home quick to let them in, and my wife works at a school so she can't just up and leave or go in late etc.

    We live in a rural area outside a small town (less than 2000 people).  These are all small local businesses/contractors doing the work.  If they were to steal stuff etc. word would spread real quick and they would be out of business in no time.  Likewise if someone were to lie about a company stealing that word would travel too, and those people would find themselves without anyone willing to do work for them.

    1) I always stay home if I'm having work done, but that may be easier for us Dutchies as we get 25 holidays a year. And a short drive home, pop in, pop back to the office is usually granted by my employers anyway. Or at least, used to be.

    2) And I thought I lived in a small town, with only half a million people. But yes, less than 2000 makes it more safe, everyone knowing everyone and all that.

    3) For your sake I hope you can get fast Internet access in your rural area.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    1) I always stay home if I'm having work done, but that may be easier for us Dutchies as we get 25 holidays a year. And a short drive home, pop in, pop back to the office is usually granted by my employers anyway. Or at least, used to be.



    2) And I thought I lived in a small town, with only half a million people. But yes, less than 2000 makes it more safe, everyone knowing everyone and all that.



    3) For your sake I hope you can get fast Internet access in your rural area.

    1)  When I used to work 5 minutes from home that was what I did too, but now it is much too time consuming to run home and back, and I can't take days off all the time anymore for stuff like this now that I have a child (need to save paid days off for when she is sick).  If it is a bigger company like DirecTV, or our internet provider then yes I do stay home or go home while the work is done.

     

    2)  Yes living in a town this small definitely has its advantages.  Many around the community don't lock their doors at all, leave their keys in their cars, etc.  I'm not quite that trusting.  It also has its disadvantages though, cause like you said everyone seems to know everyone so gossip is horrible, and people seem to stick their nose into others business when they have no right to.

     

    3) Internet service is another issue I have to deal with.  If I lived closer to town I would be fine, but we live 5 miles outside of town.  My only 2 options at this time are satellite internet or WISP.  I had HugheNet sattelite for a while until WISP was available.  Satellite was decent but expensive ($100/month) and not all that fast at 2Mbps down 0.5Mbps up, and you had daily limits on how much you could download.  Now my WISP service is about the same speeds, but for half as much money ($50/month) and no download limits.  Hughesnet has now upped their speeds, but still costs a lot more, and still has download limits (they have now changed to monthly limits instead of daily).

  • Reply 14 of 15
    1)  When I used to work 5 minutes from home that was what I did too, but now it is much too time consuming to run home and back, and I can't take days off all the time anymore for stuff like this now that I have a child (need to save paid days off for when she is sick).  If it is a bigger company like DirecTV, or our internet provider then yes I do stay home or go home while the work is done.

    With a child I can understand this.
    2)  Yes living in a town this small definitely has its advantages.  Many around the community don't lock their doors at all, leave their keys in their cars, etc.  I'm not quite that trusting.  It also has its disadvantages though, cause like you said everyone seems to know everyone so gossip is horrible, and people seem to stick their nose into others business when they have no right to.

    I also see both the advantage as well as the disadvantage. I think I would love to live in a small town like yours, but probably would freak me out if I would hear the: "yeah, they broke up. Don't know you though, do any of you?"
    3) Internet service is another issue I have to deal with.  If I lived closer to town I would be fine, but we live 5 miles outside of town.  My only 2 options at this time are satellite internet or WISP.  I had HugheNet sattelite for a while until WISP was available.  Satellite was decent but expensive ($100/month) and not all that fast at 2Mbps down 0.5Mbps up, and you had daily limits on how much you could download.  Now my WISP service is about the same speeds, but for half as much money ($50/month) and no download limits.  Hughesnet has now upped their speeds, but still costs a lot more, and still has download limits (they have now changed to monthly limits instead of daily).

    Wow that's expensive. Although in their defense I presume the costs are all used up by the ISP and it's not some dreamed up rate for getting some service they know everyone will order anyway - no matter the cost. Well, that sucks. Even if money is no issue how to deal with the data limit. Good thing you moved away from satellite, that limit wouldn't work for me (600GB last month, this months already 400GB so I'm bound to top that)

    I remember a poster here who always had the OSX updates mailed to him by post (on CD/DVD) Was that you?
  • Reply 15 of 15
    nhtnht Posts: 4,429member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hayzen View Post



    Which electronic locks do you use? Are they compatible with both iPhone and android phones?

     

    No, it's a simple keypad lock.  The battery issue is overstated and now I can't accidentally lock myself out of the house.

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