Fitness smartwatch firm Basis Science reportedly in buyout talks with Apple, others

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 40
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,303member
    ``Someone must love me! Really love me! Please? Okay listen up folks, we got steamin' hot watches that need to go before we go belly up. Know what I mean, Jean?''

    That was my instant reaction too ... although I would have said ... " ... before we go belly up once Apple totally change the the field we are in."
  • Reply 22 of 40
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,303member
    hill60 wrote: »
    Swatch Group is worth about $35 Billion and Nicolas Hayek is the "Steve Jobs" of the Swiss watch industry.

    Not going to happen.

    The Swatch Group Ltd engages in the design, manufacture, distribution, and sale of finished watches, jewelry, and watch movements and components worldwide. It operates in three segments: Watches and Jewelry, Production, and Electronic Systems. The Watches and Jewelry segment offers finished watches and jewelry. The Production segment manufactures watches, watch movements, and jewelry. The Electronic Systems segment is involved in the design, production, and commercialization of electronic components for watchmaking and other industries. The company offers its watch and jewelry products under the Breguet, Blancpain, Glashütte Original, Jaquet Droz, Léon Hatot, Omega, Tiffany & Co., Longines, Rado, Union Glashütte, Tissot, ck watch & jewelry, Balmain, Certina, Mido, Hamilton, Swatch, Flik Flak, and Endura brand names. It also supplies movements and components to third-party watchmakers. The company distributes its products through a distribution network or agents; through its network of Tourbillon name multibrand watch and jewelry boutiques, and monobrand stores; and through its e-commerce sites. The Swatch Group Ltd. is headquartered in Biel/Bienne, Switzerland.

    Soli did put a /s tag on you know. Was it worth that reply?
  • Reply 23 of 40
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Soli did put a /s tag on you know. Was it worth that reply?

    Even if he didn't see that I was joking around it was a lot of good information.
  • Reply 24 of 40
    peter236 wrote: »
    It looks like Apple is unable to develop such technology, therefore buying other companies is the way to do it. The so-called smart watch is now way behind schedule compared with the competition.

    Exactly my point ! Apple already missed the boat on creating the first phone and the first MP3 player and now they missed the boat on the iwatch. Fail after fail after fail for apple.
  • Reply 25 of 40
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    That was my instant reaction too ... although I would have said ... " ... before we go belly up once Apple totally change the the field we are in."

     

    ``I say we just go buy one giant mound of coke and just speed ball this mutha! Someone's gonna want our heads by tomorrow.''

  • Reply 26 of 40
    justp1ayin wrote: »
    Exactly my point ! Apple already missed the boat on creating the first phone and the first MP3 player and now they missed the boat on the iwatch. Fail after fail after fail for apple.

    "Daddy, where do trolls come from"?

    "No one can say for sure son, but there are new ones born on AppleInsider every day!"
  • Reply 27 of 40
    comleycomley Posts: 139member
    Thank you for clearing that up !
    Who invented the telephone , let's ask Wikipedia

    The invention of the telephone is the culmination of work done by many individuals, the history of which involves a collection of claims and counterclaims. The development of the modern electrical telephone involved an array of lawsuits founded upon the patent claims of several individuals and numerous companies.

    This article covers the early years from 1844 to 1898, from conception of the idea of an electric voice-transmission device, to failed attempts to use "make-and-break" current, to successful experiments with electromagnetic telephones by Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Watson, and finally to commercially successful telephones in the late 19th century

    The iPhone was a big jump up in the development Of the phone !
  • Reply 28 of 40
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,876member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by peter236 View Post

     

    It looks like Apple is unable to develop such technology, therefore buying other companies is the way to do it. The so-called smart watch is now way behind schedule compared with the competition.


     

    What are you talking about? What schedule? You work at Apple on the iWatch team and know of such a schedule? And you know that they are unable to develop such technologies even after they've hired up all those people from companies that HAVE DEVELOPED those technologies?

     

    Furthermore, who cares if Apple NEVER releases an iWatch, what's the point? They don't have am iThermostat yet either, are they "behind" schedule in that field as well?

     

    So far, the competition hasn't released anything compelling, other than in the sports band field. All of these so-called "smart" watches are and will be failures until they're able to pull everything together; style, functionality, support, and endurance.

  • Reply 29 of 40
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by peter236 View Post

     

    It looks like Apple is unable to develop such technology, therefore buying other companies is the way to do it. The so-called smart watch is now way behind schedule compared with the competition.


    If that's how you interpret it.

     

    I think more likely Apple is on target with their own product, and may be considering picking up this company to simply park their IP and keep Samsung from getting their hands on it.

  • Reply 30 of 40
    adamcadamc Posts: 573member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    1) As others have eluded I think Basis wants out but I question these reported talks with Apple. If I were running the company I might leak such info because Apple's name means instant and widespread exposure, but would expect someone else like Samsung or Google to buy me out.

    2) I think Samsung will have to buy Swatch so they don't have any trademark issues with their S-Watch brand¡

    I believe these people are clever to include Apple in the mix.

    Look at Waze they said a few big boys are interested and some dumb f*^%s, er rich boys gave them a billion bucks.

    Nothing like dropping names to get notice.
  • Reply 31 of 40
    nkalunkalu Posts: 315member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by waybacmac View Post

     

     

    If Basis Science had anything to offer, including patents, I think Apple would have bought them already. Now that all the talk about the iWatch involves health monitoring, I expect Samsung to buy BS (gee, how appropriate :D ) and reissue their device as Heath Gear and declare to the world that they are the leaders in innovation.




    I totally agree with you.

  • Reply 32 of 40
    comley wrote: »
    Thank you for clearing that up !
    Who invented the telephone , let's ask Wikipedia

    The invention of the telephone is the culmination of work done by many individuals, the history of which involves a collection of claims and counterclaims. The development of the modern electrical telephone involved an array of lawsuits founded upon the patent claims of several individuals and numerous companies.

    There was a lot of resistance to the telephone when it first came out. "No self-respecting businessman would be caught dead talking to a box on the wall!"
  • Reply 33 of 40
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    I'm pretty sure I will never buy another wristwatch of any kind. I hope Apple has something amazing in the works because in the US, I think many adult males have stopped wearing watches, so it better be spectacular in order to reverse that trend. In the developing world the trend appears to be gigantic mariner style wristwatches but it is strictly a fashion accessory and they are mostly cheap knock offs not Swiss. 

     

    Never buy a woman a wristwatch. There is a clock right on the stove. -- Charles Barkley 

  • Reply 34 of 40
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,599member

    Something I learned in my M&A class which holds true for 90% of the non public company being sold. Selling or Placing a company on the mark is the exit strategy for the initial investors. If they are looking to sell it in a short period of time after getting funded or offer an IPO it means its a dog. If the company is growing or showing a profits, they will keep it as long as they can since it better for them since they have more control over a private investor.  Most early investors rather find a private buyer since they usually get the best price, in this case see if they can start a bidding war. Most time they do not like the IPO path since it may not get them what they want. So if a company is being IPO, it is usually a Dog of an investment that no one wants.

  • Reply 35 of 40
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,223moderator
    solipsismx wrote: »
    700

    The strap is another thing that watches tend to do the same way. They overlap some part of the band, even ones that have the clasp. The ideal strap would be one that has no visible break in it requiring an overlap. This could perhaps be a thin strap pulled in under the watch face or maybe a diagonally shaped strap that connects sideways. Whatever connection method they go with, it should be almost instantly attached and detached. No fumbling with a catch or buckle. Like the difference between opening the magnetic MBP catch and the old Powerbook catch but strong enough to hold up to the strap leverage.

    There was a patent about a strap like the old slap bracelets:

    http://arstechnica.com/apple/2013/02/apple-patent-application-describes-iwatch-slap-bracelets/

    but what if it was like power laces:


    [VIDEO]


    You just slide it on your wrist and it pulls the strap to a comfortable tightness. Push a button and it releases instantly to let you slide it off.

    I'm still not getting the mass appeal of the health side of wearables. This site says 8.3 million units in 2012 for all fitness wearables, watches, glasses and it'll only total 64m by 2017 for all of them:

    http://venturebeat.com/2013/10/04/pebble-glass-iwatch-gear-fitbit-fuelband-64m-units-shipped-by-2017/

    This site says the market for fitness wearables in 2013 was $330m:

    http://mobihealthnews.com/28825/fitbit-jawbone-nike-had-97-percent-of-fitness-tracker-retail-sales-in-2013/

    Tim Cook is on Nike's board of directors. Would he bring out a product to compete with the market leader in wearables? Would Apple partner with Nike to do it?

    I think if they intended to make a fitness wearable, it would have limited appeal and long upgrade cycles. It also has to do important enough things that current wearables don't.
  • Reply 36 of 40
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Marvin wrote: »
    but what if it was like power laces:

    video:

    You just slide it on your wrist and it pulls the strap to a comfortable tightness. Push a button and it releases instantly to let you slide it off.

    Speaking of, it was announced last week that those will be a reality soon. Probably just in time for Marty's arrival to the future in Summer 2015.
  • Reply 37 of 40
    nhtnht Posts: 4,487member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

     

     

    Are you coming to kill me, K-K-K-Ken?


     

    Remember Wanda!

     

    REVENGE!

  • Reply 38 of 40
    Marvin wrote: »
    The strap is another thing that watches tend to do the same way. They overlap some part of the band, even ones that have the clasp. The ideal strap would be one that has no visible break in it requiring an overlap. This could perhaps be a thin strap pulled in under the watch face or maybe a diagonally shaped strap that connects sideways. Whatever connection method they go with, it should be almost instantly attached and detached. No fumbling with a catch or buckle. Like the difference between opening the magnetic MBP catch and the old Powerbook catch but strong enough to hold up to the strap leverage.

    There was a patent about a strap like the old slap bracelets:

    http://arstechnica.com/apple/2013/02/apple-patent-application-describes-iwatch-slap-bracelets/

    but what if it was like power laces:


    [VIDEO]


    You just slide it on your wrist and it pulls the strap to a comfortable tightness. Push a button and it releases instantly to let you slide it off.

    I'm still not getting the mass appeal of the health side of wearables. This site says 8.3 million units in 2012 for all fitness wearables, watches, glasses and it'll only total 64m by 2017 for all of them:

    http://venturebeat.com/2013/10/04/pebble-glass-iwatch-gear-fitbit-fuelband-64m-units-shipped-by-2017/

    This site says the market for fitness wearables in 2013 was $330m:

    http://mobihealthnews.com/28825/fitbit-jawbone-nike-had-97-percent-of-fitness-tracker-retail-sales-in-2013/

    Tim Cook is on Nike's board of directors. Would he bring out a product to compete with the market leader in wearables? Would Apple partner with Nike to do it?

    I think if they intended to make a fitness wearable, it would have limited appeal and long upgrade cycles. It also has to do important enough things that current wearables don't.

    I agree.
  • Reply 39 of 40

    I only read the headline...can somebody tell me if this "Basis Science" company is seriously gonna buy Apple?  Sounds cool.

  • Reply 40 of 40
    Basis has squat to offer Apple. This is just a sad PR grab staged by desperate investors who've finally realized they picked a losing horse struggling to minimize their losses. They're lucky if they're moving 100 units a month right now and I'm guessing at least a quarter of them come back defective based on what people post on Amazon and Basis' own forums. What unique IP do they hold? A light that comes on when you tilt your wrist? I had a Casio that did that like 25 years ago. It looked better, too.

    The market has spoken and it said "no thank you." So yeah, maybe Samsung will swoop in to scoop up the dregs.
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