Burger King to take e-wallet purchasing nationwide with new mobile app

Posted:
in iPhone edited March 2014
Fast food giant Burger King will roll out a mobile app in April that will let users pay for food at more than 7,000 locations in the U.S., expanding on the company's BK Crown Card program already available on Apple's iOS.

Burger King


The nation's second-largest burger chain by store count revealed details of the upcoming program on Wednesday in an email supplied to Bloomberg. According to the note, the plan will expand the company's e-wallet style payment service to 7,000 stores in "a few months."

From the company's description, it appears that the new system will take cues from the Burger King iOS app, which includes the BK Crown Card payment system.

Currently, the virtual wallet acts as a loyalty and payments card by incorporating a customer rewards system that dishes out coupons and other savings whenever a user recharges with a credit card. As noted in the app's release notes, functionality is limited to Sacramento, Reno, Baltimore and New York City.

Also available in the existing iOS app are nutrition facts and an interactive map showing nearby Burger King locations.

One new feature that may be added at a later date is an option to order ahead of time for later pickup. Jamba Juice offers a similar service in Jamba Curbside pickup, though customers must call in orders instead of using an app.

Burger King is the latest company to offer in-store purchases via app. It is unclear if Burger King will integrate the e-wallet functionality with Apple's Passbook like other solutions created by Starbucks and the Apple Store.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    chris_cachris_ca Posts: 2,543member
    But...
    it will fail since iOS devices don't have NFC.
  • Reply 2 of 34
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Is this a IAP that's then subjected to the customary 30% cut for Apple?
  • Reply 2 of 34
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member


     

    Something tells me that Steve Jobs wouldn’t have eaten at Burger King. ;) 

     

    Does “Have it your way.™” extend to returning the thing seven times before they get it right?

  • Reply 4 of 34
    sudonymsudonym Posts: 233member

    It is good for Apple to have partners like Burger King to enhance the usefulness of Apple products.  Apple is likely courting other fast food partners, along with big oil companies, etc.

  • Reply 5 of 34
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    An app with Burger King nutritional info... comedy gold.

    In iOS 8, Passbook will be telling you to stop in for some discount cow byproducts, while Healthbook will be telling you to flee.

    chris_ca wrote: »
    But...
    it will fail since iOS devices don't have NFC.

    NFC has been the failure so far. BT low energy is the future. And mobile payment apps have succeeded on iOS (Chipotle, Starbucks) without either.

    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Is this a IAP that's then subjected to the customary 30% cut for Apple?

    There's no 30% for selling physical goods, and no need to go through Apple's IAP system. That's why there's an Amazon app where you can actually buy stuff—not downloads (go the site for that) but actual stuff.
  • Reply 6 of 34
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    nagromme wrote: »
    There's no 30% for selling physical goods, and no need to go through Apple's IAP system. That's why there's an Amazon app where you can actually buy stuff—not downloads (go the site for that) but actual stuff.

    Why not downloads? If Amazon or another company is doing the storing and distributing then why insist on a 30% cut?
  • Reply 7 of 34
    irelandireland Posts: 17,798member
    Diabetes, now even more convenient.
  • Reply 8 of 34
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,729member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post



    An app with Burger King nutritional info... comedy gold.



    In iOS 8, Passbook will be telling you to stop in for some discount cow byproducts, while Healthbook will be telling you to flee.

    Hopefully one day someone will create an app warning you about all the health issues you are inviting by eating high carbohydrate high calorie processed foods when it senses you are approaching a fast food outlet. But how to get people who needs it to install....? Apple?

  • Reply 9 of 34
    "Diabetes, now even more convenient."
    We have a winner.
  • Reply 10 of 34
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,742member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    Is this a IAP that's then subjected to the customary 30% cut for Apple?

     

    I reloaded $50 on my Starbucks card app this morning, and I'm pretty sure Apple didn't get $15 of that.

  • Reply 11 of 34
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post



    Diabetes, now even more convenient.

    How true. Funny but in reality there is nothing wrong with a hamburger. It is nutritious. It only becomes a problem when you have lots of hamburgers and don't get any exercise. That is a personal lifestyle choice or perhaps even an addiction but it can't really be blamed on Burger King. You need to watch you caloric intake and balance that with aerobic exercise to maintain a healthy weight. Obesity causes diabetes not hamburgers.

     

    Perhaps HealthBook will help to enlighten people about diet and exercise.

  • Reply 12 of 34
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    B-B-B-Bitcoin!
  • Reply 13 of 34
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    B-B-B-Bitcoin!

    I'm not impressed with anything I've read about  Bitcoin, A bunch of hackers trying ti deceive people is what it looks like to me. Eventually, the concept of a worldwide currency might be practical and progressive but Bitcoin isn't it. The whole notion of a united Earth is very far off at this point. The dollar is already the de facto standard and that hasn't helped in any way toward promoting world peace.

  • Reply 14 of 34
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    mstone wrote: »
    I'm not impressed with anything I've read about  Bitcoin, A bunch of hackers trying ti deceive people is what it looks like to me. Eventually, the concept of a worldwide currency might be practical and progressive but Bitcoin isn't it. The whole notion of a united Earth is very far off at this point. The dollar is already the de facto standard and that hasn't helped in any way toward promoting world peace.

    You are making a bunch of very strange leaps with little logical connection.
  • Reply 15 of 34
    mpantonempantone Posts: 2,067member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post



    You are making a bunch of very strange leaps with little logical connection.

    Welcome to AppleInsider, circa 2014!

     

    We hope you enjoy your stay here, SpamSandwich!

  • Reply 16 of 34
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    nagromme wrote: »
    NFC has been the failure so far. BT low energy is the future. And mobile payment apps have succeeded on iOS (Chipotle, Starbucks) without either.

    I do agree that BLE has a strong future but I wouldn't count NFC out. It has features that assist in transactional security that BLE will never be able to match. I think the future is BLE for setting up the negotiation and NFC for the actual secure transition between the two devices, but this still needs a strong vendor to properly coordinate with retail outlets and financial institutions to make the proper changes for this to succeed. The current solution for NFC isn't even half-assed, more like eighth- or sixteenth-assed.

    I don't know about Chipotle but Starbucks works by bringing up the app or Passbook pass on your device and then using that barcode to register your purchase.
  • Reply 17 of 34
    irelandireland Posts: 17,798member
    mstone wrote: »
    How true. Funny but in reality there is nothing wrong with a hamburger. It is nutritious. It only becomes a problem when you have lots of hamburgers and don't get any exercise. That is a personal lifestyle choice or perhaps even an addiction but it can't really be blamed on Burger King. You need to watch you caloric intake and balance that with aerobic exercise to maintain a healthy weight. Obesity causes diabetes not hamburgers.

    Perhaps HealthBook will help to enlighten people about diet and exercise.

    I only eat non-preserved/processes organic grass-fed mince prime cut beef with a ciabatta bun when I make my own beef-burger. A world apart from what you get in the King. The buns are one of the worst parts one these burgers and organic mince is way better for you. 8 times the vitamin K for example. When you can leave a patty under your bed for a year and have it look the same as the day it has been served something is seriously, seriously wrong. Exercise is important for strengthening your tissues and bones and getting your heart going. Counting calories is not necessarily at all, in fact most people think the wrong foods are healthy and avoid foods with fat when they are counting calories because they think they're bad from you. What you put in your body has a far bigger effect on your weight than anything else. In short: avoid things with added sugar, avoid processed foods, eat fresh, local and learn to love cooking, avoid foods labelled low-fat because that usually means higher in sugar and the only thing eating stuff like this does is reduce the protein hormone count in your body (complex groups of amino acids) which throws off the apatite and metabolism process in your body. Like the way drinking carbonated sodas gives one spare tyre syndrome. The body isn't design to consume it. If you eat the right things you'll never need to count another calorie again, because your body begins to tell what what you need and when you've had enough and generally regulates itself like a well oiled machine.
  • Reply 18 of 34
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post





    I only eat non-preserved/processes organic grass-fed mince prime cut beef with a ciabatta bun when I make my own beef-burger. A world apart from what you get in the King. The buns are one of the worst parts one these burgers and organic mince is way better for you. 8 times the vitamin K for example. When you can leave a patty under your bed for a year and have it look the same as the day it has been served something is seriously, seriously wrong. Exercise is important for strengthening your tissues and bones and getting your heart going. Counting calories is not necessarily at all, in fact most people think the wrong foods are healthy and avoid foods with fat when they are counting calories because they think they're bad from you. What you put in your body has a far bigger effect on your weight than anything else. In short: avoid things with added sugar, avoid processed foods, eat fresh, local and learn to love cooking, avoid foods labelled low-fat because that usually means higher in sugar and the only thing eating stuff like this does is reduce the protein hormone count in your body (complex groups of amino acids) which throws off the apatite and metabolism process in your body. Like the way drinking carbonated sodas gives one spare tyre syndrome. The body isn't design to consume it. If you eat the right things you'll never need to count another calorie again, because your body begins to tell what what you need and when you've had enough and generally regulates itself like a well oiled machine.

     

    Have you ever considered how many people in this world would starve to death if we had no pesticides, no herbicides, no GMOs, no fertilizers, all organic agriculture? Just like the environmentalists who tout wind and solar, organic farming sounds good until you scale it up to worldwide dimensions. We don’t have enough acreage to do that. Try talking to a real farmer who has a masters degree in agriculture from the University of Illinois. I have. 

  • Reply 19 of 34
    irelandireland Posts: 17,798member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     

    Have you ever considered how many people in this world would starve to death if we had no pesticides, no herbicides, no GMOs, no fertilizers, all organic agriculture? Just like the environmentalists who tout wind and solar, organic farming sounds good until you scale it up to worldwide dimensions. We don’t have enough acreage to do that. Try talking to a real farmer who has a masters degree in agriculture from the University of Illinois. I have. 


     

    That's a fair point, but it doesn't make organic food any worse for you. It doesn't make it any less healthy. It doesn't stop corn fed cattle stomachs from exploding, or pesticides from killing bees. We need to start rethinking all of this and what we put in our bodies. Where there's a will there's a way.

  • Reply 20 of 34
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    ireland wrote: »
    That's a fair point, but it doesn't make organic food any worse for you. It doesn't make it any less healthy. It doesn't stop corn fed cattle stomachs from exploding, or pesticides from killing bees. We need to start rethinking all of this and what we put in our bodies. Where there's a will there's a way.

    1) We should always be rethinking every decision if there are still unknowns, but I'm glad to see you say it; I just wish you'd apply that to technology when you make this hardened predictions of what you're certain will occur.

    2) You do realize the average human lives longer now, right? You do realize that nearly everything you put into your body has been altered by man. From the flour in your ciabatta bun to the domesticated prime cut beef you talk up are all a product of agriculture, cultivation and animal husbandry. Does the wheat in your ciabatta bun have more nutrients than the slower-growing wheat it originated from?

    3) I think [@]lkrupp[/@]'s point is that the world would not be able to sustain the population it does now if you're personal feeding habits were the only right answer. You, and many others in wealthy and technologically advanced nations, have that option but it's simply not a possibility for most. It's like assuming that everyone in the world should have the latest Mac Pro because it's better than a $300. It's a nice thought but it's not practical.
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