Adobe overhauls Premiere Pro, After Effects with tighter integration for video pros

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 28
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    This is the old mainframe software model, particularly as practiced by IBM. Firms did not purchase their mainframe software, they rented it. The personal computer ended that. IBM and Adobe have revived it, albeit at lower prices. We might also take note of this: rentals convert software from a technology product to a public utility. Utility companies are not innovation-free but they are among the least innovative companies in business. Think the phone company, power company, water company, refuse removal, [I]etc[/I].

    This notion that freed the need to update existing versions to incorporate bug fixes and security vulnerabilities and to accumulate enough new features to justify a new version, that somehow Adobe will magically give us continual innovation--well, sounds like waiting for the Great Pumpkin. New software has bugs--most do anyway. What folks are really saying is that many bugs will never be fixed. This predicted flood of innovation sounds more like a torrent of bloatware. And what is the advantage upshot of this bloatware? It is certainly less that some are claiming. If you business depends on software, but your employees are struggling to keep-up with the changes in new releases, then those employees are less productive than they should be. The whole point of computer software is to increase productivity, not decrease it.
  • Reply 22 of 28
    bulk001bulk001 Posts: 685member

    But they have only released one "big" version since going to CC... just like they always did with their .5 upgrades.
    They have been releasing constant updates and features. But even if you are right the one big update has cost me a lot less than buying the point update would have under the old system. It also has some useful management tools - I can deactivate remotely and activate on a new machine with each login. In the end it comes down to if the old CS 6 features are all you need and keep working for you then don't update.
  • Reply 23 of 28
    Agreed! Not a big fan of Adobe. And really abhor subscription services. I don't like companies dipping into my checking acct. every month! Thanks, but no thanks.

    Best.

    Worst.
  • Reply 24 of 28
    danoxdanox Posts: 837member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by superjunaid View Post



    I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.



    Yes sure Apple is a hardware company designing software for its' hardware and hence they can get away with such a software update model.

     

    It doesn't, fixing bugs and adding good features still takes time months in fact, charging a fair price and upgrading the software works, Adobe like Autodesk are two of the worse software companies out there in terms of offering meaningful upgrades over the years, Autocad 2002 is still the best Autocad ever made. Over the years I just don't trust Adobe very similar to Quark these days.

     

    PS, Apple's iWorks last upgrade is faster at loading and saving documents within Pages on a iPad 2, moving around within the program is actually better than before and I'm running iOS 7.1.

  • Reply 25 of 28
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,726moderator
    I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.

    Adobe is a publicly traded company so they have to account for their costs. With a product model rather than a service model, you create a final version, sell it and then define a support period, which is included in the costs. The support eventually has to run out otherwise that software version runs out of profit and this forces an upgrade sale in order to pay for the development of the new version.

    In Apple's case in terms of software bundled with hardware, they state in their SEC filing:

    "Revenue allocated to the unspecified software upgrade rights and non-software services based on the Company’s ESPs is deferred and recognized on a straight-line basis over the estimated period the software upgrades and non-software services are expected to be provided for each of these devices, which ranges from two to four years.

    Beginning in September 2013, the combined ESPs for iPhone and iPad were increased by up to $5 to reflect additions to unspecified software upgrade rights due to expansion of essential software bundled with these devices. Accordingly, the range of combined ESPs for iPhone and iPad as of September 2013 is $15 to $25."

    That's why they drop things like iOS 7 support from the 3GS as it's over 4 years old. Things like Aperture or Pages, I'm not sure how they account for those but the feature additions are usually minor. There's only been a single version of Aperture on the App Store (v3).

    Adobe isn't allowed to add features to the previous version for free otherwise they have to adjust their accounting. AVID got caught out with this and it resulted in them being delisted from NASDAQ because they couldn't adjust their 5 million orders quickly enough:

    http://www.sonicscoop.com/2014/03/04/is-avid-ok-or-not-what-the-nasdaq-delisting-really-means-to-pro-tools-users/

    "evaluate its current and historical accounting treatment related to bug fixes, upgrades and enhancements to certain products which the company has provided to certain customers.

    We are continuing to work very hard to correct the accounting, which is related to nearly 5 million transaction lines spanning eight-and-a half years. We announced that we are targeting completion of the restatement by mid-2014.”

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/bobbyowsinski/2014/02/27/major-changes-around-the-corner-for-music-as-avid-delists/

    NEC got caught with it too:

    http://ww2.cfo.com/accounting-tax/2008/01/why-vsoe-spells-trouble/

    and similarly delisted.

    The subscription models take away this issue entirely as the revenue is recurring. It's an easy permanent lifeline for a company but every company that wants to still be around in the long-term tries to protect their revenue. Eventually, Adobe's software might reach a point where there's no meaningful updates but what would people prefer to happen, that they go out of business and everybody has to go through a transition to some alternative that would suffer the same fate because they'll plateau too?

    Adobe doesn't even have to just add value by updating their own software. They can buy out Maxon and bundle Cinema 4D. They can buyout plugin developers like genarts:

    http://www.genarts.com/software/sapphire/overview

    They did this with Cycore plugins. Adobe's investors look for growth and they grow subscribers by lowering the entry price. Having a $2000 entry price with limited support has a high barrier to entry and low customer satisfaction because when the support runs out, it eventually creates a problem with either version syncing or some breakage caused by 3rd party software.

    The subscription model has its own flaws and they should allow opening and exporting files outside of a valid license but it's not like the standalone license was a great setup either. The reviews for the new model is 4.5/5 from 919 reviews:

    http://www.adobe.com/products/creativecloud/reviews.html

    It would be much better if it was 1/3rd, 1/5th, 1/10th the cost but the only way it can be is with recurring revenue and subscriber growth. They are at 1.8 million subscribers so far and now make more from it than standalone sales:

    http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-19/adobes-controversial-subscription-model-proves-surprisingly-popular
    http://seekingalpha.com/article/2096663-adobe-systems-ceo-discusses-f1q2014-results-earnings-call-transcript

    "Driving that customer adoption and satisfaction is the ongoing flow of innovation in the Creative Cloud platform. Coming off our delivery of more than 500 new features and capabilities last year to Creative Cloud subscribers and enterprise users"
  • Reply 26 of 28
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member

    Quote:


    Originally Posted by superjunaid View Post



    I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.



    Yes sure Apple is a hardware company designing software for its' hardware and hence they can get away with such a software update model.

     

    You should consider Apple's business model. They offer software at little to no additional cost to sell hardware. They have an app store which helps push their hardware, yet that also provides a revenue stream without the same level of development costs. Adobe's business model relies on the exact thing that Apple generally tries to commoditize. It should be obvious that you can't compare their business models. You should compare Adobe to another company whose business model is software centric.

     

     

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post





    The subscription models take away this issue entirely as the revenue is recurring. It's an easy permanent lifeline for a company but every company that wants to still be around in the long-term tries to protect their revenue. Eventually, Adobe's software might reach a point where there's no meaningful updates but what would people prefer to happen, that they go out of business and everybody has to go through a transition to some alternative that would suffer the same fate because they'll plateau too?



    Adobe doesn't even have to just add value by updating their own software. They can buy out Maxon and bundle Cinema 4D. They can buyout plugin developers like genarts:



    http://www.genarts.com/software/sapphire/overview

     

    I don't know about buying out everything. C4D is used a lot in motion graphics work, so I see why you suggested Maxon. It wouldn't necessarily be good for the future of that software. Typically when a company is bought out, the larger company isn't as aggressive on development cycle. Right now Adobe's software could use an update in color management to better integrate ICC v4 and smooth out color management across various software, especially photoshop and illustrator with after effects. Most of their tools are painfully old. There's so much research over the past decade that hasn't made it into those programs in a meaningful way. They also set up the most awkward workflows even within a single application. I could write pages on that, but I don't feel like it right now. If anyone is truly interested in that, name the application. Going into all of them would take forever.

  • Reply 27 of 28
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,471member
    No mention of Adobe supporting the new Mac Pro's dual GPUs in this article. Is there any such news?
  • Reply 28 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    This update is a perfect example of why it is better. They are only updating the video apps. With the old model they would release a new suite with only a few bug fixes to some apps and major new features to others but they were all bundled together. Now the apps can be updated when necessary or as soon as they are ready.


     

    It's better until they overhaul one of the applications and it sucks. So far Adobe has been decent about not killing needed features but that's not saying they won't pull an apple one day and totally redesign a key product and omit half of the most critical features in exchange for a more optimized work flow. Having CS6 to fall back on gives me a little confidence that for a few years, at least, I have a suite of tools that I can do work on if the cloud experience goes bad. 

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