Tim Cook lauds 'American manufacturing expertise' during visit to Texas Mac Pro factory

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  • Reply 41 of 62
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,291member
    slurpy wrote: »
    It's a damn factory- it's probably using very custom software, that has to interface with a variety of systems and machines, that is not available for Mac OSX. It's not that shocking. I'd be shocked if computers in an assembly line are running OSX. It probably would not be the best setup for the tasks. 
    Are you implying that OS X cannot be used in a manufacturing setting? OS X underpinnings are more sophisticated than Windows, so it can handle the job just fine. The fault here as usual is the people who program the control software for the hardware continue to shun OS X. That needs to change.
  • Reply 42 of 62
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

     

     

    I agree with you, more or less. Materials science, manufacturing and computer programming should be subjects American students are taught very early and using the very latest information. I'm against public education anyway, so... The current educational system is an inefficient student assembly line.


    I never realized just how far behind the American education system was until my daughter asked us if she could spend a semester abroad in California with a host family. After doing some research and talking with a liaison of the program we learned that it would have put a lot of  strain on our daughter. She would have had to keep up with her studies in Switzerland so as to not fall to far behind when she came back home. The US is literally 2 and in some studies like math, languages and sciences 3 years behind us. For instance children start to learn a second and most of the time a third language at the age of 9, my daughter who is now 15 is currently taking Trigonometry and Chemistry. She would have went to high-school as a freshmen in California which would have meant the highest math she would have been allowed to take was Algebra, they same thing with language, science and even history. Needless to say we passed on the opportunity but not the idea of her studying abroad so she will be going to a private school in South Africa at the end of August.

  • Reply 43 of 62
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post





    Are you implying that OS X cannot be used in a manufacturing setting? OS X underpinnings are more sophisticated than Windows, so it can handle the job just fine. The fault here as usual is the people who program the control software for the hardware continue to shun OS X. That needs to change.

    I don't think it has anything to do with software engineers ignoring OSX. They're just catering to what the market is using, PC's on assembly lines even ones as sophisticated as those used for the manufacturing of the Mac Pro are industrial grade custom machines specifically designed for the task at hand. If Apple was to branch out into this market I have no doubt manufactures would be using them as well. Not everything is a conspiracy against Apple and no nothing needs to change, Apple is doing just fine in their chosen markets.

  • Reply 44 of 62
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member
    [/quote]
    relic wrote: »
    I never realized just how far behind the American education system was until my daughter asked us if she could spend a semester abroad in California with a host family. After doing some research and talking with a liaison of the program we learned that it would have put a lot of  strain on our daughter. She would have had to keep up with her studies in Switzerland so as to not fall to far behind when she came back home. The US is literally 2 and in some studies like math, languages and sciences 3 years behind us. For instance children start to learn a second and most of the time a third language at the age of 9, my daughter who is now 15 is currently taking Trigonometry and Chemistry. She would have went to high-school as a freshmen in California which would have meant the highest math she would have been allowed to take was Algebra, they same thing with language, science and even history. Needless to say we passed on the opportunity but not the idea of her studying abroad so she will be going to a private school in South Africa at the end of August.

    That's interesting. I'm curious if any private schools in the US would be more closely on par. Also, why private in SA and not public? I don't know anything about SA schools.

    Regardless- your daughter sounds very intelligent and open minded to new experiences. I'm sure you're very proud. Keep up the good work! :)
  • Reply 45 of 62
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cromas View Post



    lol @ iMacs running Windows XP in the background.

    Are you sure those are Macs? At a guess, I'd think it would be diagnostic software and it didn't run on anything but Windows. Could be running in emulation though.

  • Reply 46 of 62
    andysolandysol Posts: 2,506member
    Are you sure those are Macs? At a guess, I'd think it would be diagnostic software and it didn't run on anything but Windows. Could be running in emulation though.

    The macs are right by the front employees head. Obviously iMacs. They're running boot camp most likely, although I guess they could technically be running windows exclusively.

    All it makes me do is feel sorry for Those workers. I'm lucky in that I don't have to use a program hat only uses windows. All my other employees do though. ;)
  • Reply 47 of 62
    benjamin frostbenjamin frost Posts: 7,203member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Potsie Webber View Post



    Why not say USA -- A beer in one hand and a gun in the other?image image




    Yup. It's the nation. The attitude of roughly 50% of the populous. Maybe more than. Texas is just a hotbed or focal point for the politics. The attitudes are everywhere.



    Oh and don't forget the bible and cigarettes.

     

    All good stuff.

  • Reply 48 of 62
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    hmm wrote: »
    Do you have that quote? I remember it being a matter of locating enough engineers, although I'm sure costs factored in. The line that is assembled in the US has the lowest volume and highest price. It's not exactly the same scale as something like the iphone, although many of the idevice SoCs are produced in the US. In any case there's more than one factor when determining where to produce something, and beyond that I encourage everyone not to take executive speech at face value.



    Most people do hate the public school system as it is, and a lot of them have overly simplistic ideas regarding how it could be fixed or what would replace it. I have yet to see a single well fleshed out plan presented anywhere on that one. The other comments are more interesting. By manufacturing are you referring to machinist work or something? There are menial tasks that are specific to the job, but some schools used to have various vocational electives such as metal shop. You might want to familiarize yourself with the level of education required to do anything substantial in materials science. It's a very Phd heavy field.

    Yes, I'm suggesting students should acquire a base level of metallurgy, chemistry and various methods of fabrication. I don't think people understand or appreciate how things are made.
  • Reply 49 of 62
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    andysol wrote: »
    That's interesting. I'm curious if any private schools in the US would be more closely on par. Also, why private in SA and not public? I don't know anything about SA schools.

    Regardless- your daughter sounds very intelligent and open minded to new experiences. I'm sure you're very proud. Keep up the good work! :)[/quote]

    Thank you for that nice comment. The agency my daughters school is using for matching students with host schools around the world has a specfic list that they collaborate with, the one in South Africa just happens to be private. I don't think it has anything to do with them being better then the public schools. It's also an all girl boarding school so I defiantly feel a lot safer then if she was going to stay with a host family. Plus it will give her a better chance at making a few more friends.
  • Reply 50 of 62
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Yes, I'm suggesting students should acquire a base level of metallurgy, chemistry and various methods of fabrication. I don't think people understand or appreciate how things are made.

    Yeah, companies like Nike could sponsor a high school and then outfit them with a full assembly line for making quality American made shoes. Then students will get an education on not only how a modern assembly line works but social study credits as well as they will get first hand experience on how a third world country sweat shop works. Though it might take a while for Nike to get used to working with children that are older than 9, so it will be an education for all those involved, win, win.
  • Reply 51 of 62
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    relic wrote: »
    Yeah, companies like Nike could sponsor a high school and then outfit them with a full assembly line for making quality American made shoes. Then students will get an education on not only how a modern assembly line works but social study credits as well as they will get first hand experience on how a third world country sweat shop works. Though it might take a while for Nike to get used to working with children that are older than 9, so it will be an education for all those involved, win, win.

    A shame you went sarcastic when the conversation was just getting interesting.
  • Reply 52 of 62
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    A shame you went sarcastic when the conversation was just getting interesting.

    Ooh, It was just a silly joke, don't get upset.
  • Reply 53 of 62

    Tim, time to close your Texan manufacturing plants now the Texas Republican Party has endorsed ‘reparative therapy’ for homosexuals.

  • Reply 54 of 62
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bloodshotrollin'red View Post

     

    Tim, time to close your Texan manufacturing plants now the Texas Republican Party has endorsed ‘reparative therapy’ for homosexuals.


    It's not like it's mandatory, it's a free counseling service for anyone who wants it but can't afford it. I personally don't believe that homosexuality is a mental desease but their are those who are suffering none the less with it. Maybe talking to someone will help, if the person feels the treatment isn't helping they can always just leave. Yes I am fully aware that this is just a ploy from the Right Wing to gain favor with their anti gay Christian constituents but free mental health services is never a bad thing.

  • Reply 55 of 62
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,221member
    relic wrote: »
    It's not like it's mandatory, it's a free counseling service for anyone who wants it but can't afford it. I personally don't believe that homosexuality is a mental desease but their are those who are suffering none the less with it. Maybe talking to someone will help, if the person feels the treatment isn't helping they can always just leave. Yes I am fully aware that this is just a ploy from the Right Wing to gain favor with their anti gay Christian constituents but free mental health services is never a bad thing.

    Reparative therapy is not the work of misinformed psychiatrists and counselors. No licensed clinical psychologist, psychiatrist, or counselor in the United States will offer such "treatment." So, what you would have is an employer, the justice system, or some other coercive power that orders a gay person to enter into treatment with a therapist that is offering fraudulent service.

    It would be one thing if reparative therapy were only recognized as a fraud. However, it is also recognized as harmful to the people who are the patients of the therapists. We a saying in America: "No harm, no foul." In the case of reparative therapy, there is both.
  • Reply 56 of 62
    russellrussell Posts: 296member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post





    Are you implying that OS X cannot be used in a manufacturing setting? OS X underpinnings are more sophisticated than Windows, so it can handle the job just fine. The fault here as usual is the people who program the control software for the hardware continue to shun OS X. That needs to change.

     

    It is not worth the time nor money, for industrial machine manufacturers to start writing programs for Mac when the hardware costs more and there are fewer programmers.

     

    Just look to the number of game titles for Mac as an example.

  • Reply 57 of 62
    russellrussell Posts: 296member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    In the US, they apparently don't wear ISO clean room head gear like in China.

    image 


    Not every section of an assembly line requires the high level of cleanliness that LCD displays, cover glass or cameras require.

  • Reply 58 of 62

    The factory has clean rooms for those components that require such effort. Nothing about the assembling of the mac-pro would warrant the cost. ESD precautions are all that are necessary. 

  • Reply 59 of 62

    Wrong... these are not Chinese parts. Almost all the parts as built in house with the exception of some very small purchased cables, screws and the like and actual processor on the CPU card, all major components are built on site. 

  • Reply 60 of 62

    It isn't a Mac factory, as in Apple doesn't own it, they the customer to this manufacturer who uses their own manufacturing software (MES) to automate the process which is run on a Windows platform and is used in the manufacturing of all the products they are contracted to build. It would not be cost efficient to ask a manufacturer to run on a totally different software, interfacing with MacOSX testing systems and automation systems is far more efficient than totally redesigning an in place effective solution. 

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