Alleged 'iPhone 6' logic board claimed to include 802.11ac Wi-Fi, NFC chip

13567

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 130
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Never say never! ????????

    But there’s no such thing as an A7X. Apple wouldn’t make an entire chip just for the Apple TV. It’ll get A8 or the A7 leftovers like always.
  • Reply 42 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    wizard69 wrote: »
    Holding a patent drives innovation because to compete you have to come up with a different solution that also works better.

    That's so idealistic, but not very realistic. Just look at how many things we use today whose design hasn't changed in decades, even centuries.Sometimes there just isn't a different solution that works the same let alone better.
  • Reply 43 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    lkrupp wrote: »
    Why so hung ho about NFC? Because the other guys have it? Because it’s the world standard for mobile payments (NOT!)? Who says NFC is the cat’s meow? The iHaters, if course, because Apple doesn’t have it. I don’t know if NFC is worth a plug nickel as a technology but I hope Apple isn’t including it just because the techies are enamored with it. 

    I'm not hung ho about NFC. No one can say for certain what Apple's plans are if any for NFC. The same people that say it sucks, and Apple will never use it will be on here saying it's suddenly a great idea. I don't know about you, but in my book that's hypocrisy.
  • Reply 44 of 130
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,771member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    Or



    3. They do plan to use it.

     

    No, because that contradicts the condition you set: You asked why would they put time and money into researching NFC if they're not going to use it. I gave examples of possible reasons that fit that description.

     

    I get your point, though.

  • Reply 45 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    No, because that contradicts the condition you set: You asked why would they put time and money into researching NFC if they're not going to use it. I gave examples of possible reasons that fit that description.

    I get your point, though.

    You are correct. I should have written;

    3. Keeping their options open

    Conviction has a funny way of making one look foolish sometimes. I've said 'maybe' a lot in my life. :lol:
  • Reply 46 of 130
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,771member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    I can understand patenting it for licensing reasons, but protecting it so that no one else can use it is greedy, and the epitome of being a patent troll.

     

    The practice isn't limited to patents.

     

    In the days before a live news report from the field could be sent via cellular, a popular way to do it was via fiber links from various spots around the province. When news would happen at a location near one of those fiber connections, one particular station would immediately book the line even if they didn't have a reporter in the area. It meant they paid for a line they didn't use, but no one else could "beat" them by having a live report when they couldn't.

  • Reply 47 of 130
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,771member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post

     

    Great… One more who doesn't understand what a patent troll is. (or perhaps someone who just does;t understand what a patent is for; period?_




    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post

     

    HAHAHA! "The definition you found"?? Oooh "good job" using that internet thing.




    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post

     

    Holy crap! Do you mean to tell us you can't even google  "apple nfc patent"  ?

    Typing those three little words into your web browser is too much for you to handle??

    Good luck in life.


     

    @BobSchlob, it would make my reading experience more enjoyable if you would make your point without the insults and mocking, please.

     

    Aside from bringing down the mood of the room, it actually diminishes how seriously people take your comments since it comes across like a guy sitting in the bleachers sucking on his ninth beer and being belligerent. A less denigrating tone would go a long way toward fixing that.

     

    Thanks!

  • Reply 48 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    <a data-huddler-embed="href" href="/u/200283/BobSchlob" style="display:inline-block;">@BobSchlob</a>
    , it would make my reading experience more enjoyable if you would make your point without the insults and mocking, please.

    Aside from bringing down the mood of the room, it actually diminishes how seriously people take your comments since it comes across like a guy sitting in the bleachers sucking on his ninth beer and being belligerent. A less denigrating tone would go a long way toward fixing that.

    Thanks!

    Or as Krazee Eyez Killa would say

    [VIDEO]
  • Reply 49 of 130
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,643member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



    I'm not hung ho about NFC. No one can say for certain what Apple's plans are if any for NFC. The same people that say it sucks, and Apple will never use it will be on here saying it's suddenly a great idea.

    Japan has been using an NFC contactless payment system on cellphones since 2005 (the wildly popular "osaifu keitai").

     

    Not a big deal.

     

    Most US transit system cards for large metropolitan markets (like the SF Bay Area's "Clipper Card") are based on RFID NFC.

  • Reply 50 of 130
    lkrupp wrote: »
    Why so hung ho about NFC? Because the other guys have it? Because it’s the world standard for mobile payments (NOT!)? Who says NFC is the cat’s meow? The iHaters, if course, because Apple doesn’t have it. I don’t know if NFC is worth a plug nickel as a technology but I hope Apple isn’t including it just because the techies are enamored with it. 

    The saltiness of your tears will be delicious when Apple releases a phone with NFC.
  • Reply 51 of 130
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    NFC would be one reasonable explanation to those very wide bands breaking up the metal pieces on the back of the rumoured casing.

    Why it can't be placed behind the Apple logo...
    woochifer wrote: »
    Read Apple's iOS security white paper, or listen to Steve Gibson's security podcasts on iOS (episodes 446 through 448). The level of security that Apple builds into iOS is impressive and seems well thought out.

    IIRC, a passcode is required during restart because iOS' security protocol purges the encryption keys used by Touch ID from memory whenever the phone restarts. Apple also requires that the hardware identifiers on both the A7 and the Touch ID match up. The fingerprint data itself is very well secured, and no scans are kept on the phone itself.

    I bet they would still require a passcode before you can start using Touch ID because the passcode is something that can be kept to memory and not something that is literally at the tip of your finger.

    sockrolid wrote: »
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">?But, as you say, the real benefit of Touch ID is improving security for the great middle of the consumer bell curve.  </span>
    For<span style="line-height:1.4em;"> the average consumer.  The would-be techies who flame amongst themselves online have no effect on them.  Maybe that's why Topolsky quit The Verge and went to Bloomberg.  The techie market is only so big.</span>

    The benefit of Touch ID is getting people to secure their devices where they would have otherwise not done so but the reason they do so is because it's convenient. This convenience also translates into people like me using a complex alphanumeric password that has many more than 10,000 combinations.
  • Reply 52 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    This convenience also translates into people like me using a complex alphanumeric password that has many more than 10,000 combinations.

    You sure you have that number right? A simple 4 number password has 10,000 combinations. Add a letter and it goes into the millions. A simple 4 character alphanumeric password has 1,679,616 combinations.
  • Reply 53 of 130
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    You sure you have that number right? A simple 4 number password has 10,000 combinations. Add a letter and it goes into the millions. A simple 4 character alphanumeric password has 1,679,616 combinations.

    I do. Your comment states what mine states but I didn't attempt to figure out how many key options are available for the full keyboard. I am using a passcode that is much longer than 4 characters. Since I only have to input it after a restart it's not a chore.
  • Reply 54 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I do. Your comment states what mine states but I didn't attempt to figure out how many key options are available for the full keyboard. I am using a passcode that is much longer than 4 characters. Since I only have to input it after a restart it's not a chore.

    Excluding symbols but using a caps sensitive password would give you 62 choices for every character. So a 5 character password would be 62^5 which equals 916,132,832 combinations. I'm pretty sure that you understated that number a bit. ;)
  • Reply 55 of 130
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Excluding symbols but using a caps sensitive password would give you 62 choices for every character. So a 5 character password would be 62^5 which equals 916,132,832 combinations. I'm pretty sure that you understated that number a bit. ;)

    What I said was factual, just not precise. I didn't want to count every combination in the full keyboard and then figure what it could with who-knows-how-many-characters-you-can-use.


    PS: In previous versions of iOS — probably when you needed the Enterprise tool to enable the complex password — if you chose anything other than 4 digits, even if they were all digits the full keyboard would still pop up, which was a bit annoying. Now if you want a 10 digit passcode it will only be the keypad.
  • Reply 56 of 130
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    What I said was factual, just not precise. I didn't want to count every combination in the full keyboard and then figure what it could with who-knows-how-many-characters-you-can-use.


    PS: In previous versions of iOS — probably when you needed the Enterprise tool to enable the complex password — if you chose anything other than 4 digits, even if they were all digits the full keyboard would still pop up, which was a bit annoying. Now if you want a 10 digit passcode it will only be the keypad.

    I didn't say it wasn't factual. Just that it was understated by my guess several billion.
  • Reply 57 of 130
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    I didn't say it wasn't factual. Just that it was understated by my guess several billion.

    I'd say it's into the trillions.
  • Reply 58 of 130
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I bet they would still require a passcode before you can start using Touch ID because the passcode is something that can be kept to memory and not something that is literally at the tip of your finger.

    That implies that, at the end of the day, in the rock/paper/scissors sense, Passcode > TouchID. No way to argue around that, except to make a lame 'convenience' argument for TouchID.
  • Reply 59 of 130
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    That implies that, at the end of the day, in the rock/paper/scissors sense, Passcode > TouchID. No way to argue around that, except to make a lame 'convenience' argument for TouchID.

    1) A password is more secure. This is a fact.

    2) Touch ID is so convenient that security has gone from 50% to 80%.

    3) No idea what roshambo has to do with anything. There is no something else that is better than a passcode but worse Touch ID to bring into the equation.

    4) I'd love to here your argument as to why you think Touch ID isn't convenient.
  • Reply 60 of 130
    solipsismx wrote: »
    That implies that, at the end of the day, in the rock/paper/scissors sense, Passcode > TouchID. No way to argue around that, except to make a lame 'convenience' argument for TouchID.

    1) A password is more secure. This is a fact.

    2) Touch ID is so convenient that security has gone from 50% to 80%.

    3) No idea what roshambo has to do with anything. There is no something else that is better than a passcode but worse Touch ID to bring into the equation.

    4) I'd love to here your argument as to why you think Touch ID isn't convenient.

    I guess you did not read my post carefully. Or, if you did, understand what I am getting at. I am saying that convenience, not security, is what it has going for it (as currently implemented).
Sign In or Register to comment.