Apple refutes Beats layoff rumors, says every employee offered a job

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 30
    izzysizzys Posts: 4member
    There really is a difference between the word "refute" and the word "dispute." What was meant here was "dispute," unless the author of this article is stating an omniscient judgement of the matter.
  • Reply 22 of 30
    izzys wrote: »
    There really is a difference between the word "refute" and the word "dispute." What was meant here was "dispute," unless the author of this article is stating an omniscient judgement of the matter.

    It's you who needs the grammar lesson. 'Refute' is the correct word.
  • Reply 23 of 30
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,831member

    You are wrong.

     

    Refute means disprove by providing evidence.  Apple haven't done that (not that they need to or anyone is asking).  They've denied it, or they've disputed it, they haven't refuted it.

     

    Also, it isn't grammar, it's semantics.

  • Reply 24 of 30
    crowley wrote: »
    You are wrong.

    Refute means disprove by providing evidence.  Apple haven't done that (not that they need to or anyone is asking).  They've denied it, or they've disputed it, they haven't refuted it.

    Also, it isn't grammar, it's semantics.

    Grammar or semantics, you're quibbling over semantics.

    You're wrong on all counts.
  • Reply 25 of 30
    richlorichlo Posts: 46member

    Its show biz folks. Thats how it works and they are used to it. Nothing to see here.

  • Reply 26 of 30
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,831member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post





    Grammar or semantics, you're quibbling over semantics.



    You're wrong on all counts.

    I didn't raise the quibble, and you responded to it.  Dismissing it as quibbling once you've been proved wrong is rather cowardly, and calling someone wrong without any supporting evidence doesn't mean anything.  You're disputing me, but you're not refuting me.  When you do that, I'll take you seriously.  

     

     

     

    Here is the dictionary definition of refute: 

    Quote:

    1. to prove to be false or erroneous, as an opinion or charge.

    2. to prove (a person) to be in error.


    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/refute

     

    Note the "to prove" part

     

     

     

    Here is the dictionary definition of grammar:

    Quote:

    1. the study of the way the sentences of a language are constructed; morphology and syntax.

    2. these features or constructions themselves: English grammar.

    3. an account of these features; a set of rules accounting for these constructions: a grammar of English.

    4. Generative Grammar . a device, as a body of rules, whose output is all of the sentences that are permissible in a given language, while excluding all those that are not permissible.

    5. prescriptive grammar.


    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/grammar?s=t

     

    Note the absence of anything to do with the meaning of words.

     

     

     

    QED, it is not me who is wrong on both counts.

  • Reply 27 of 30
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post



    What's interesting is; I believe this is the first time I've heard the word "rumor" associated with this story in any way.

    Just goes to show...

     

    AppleInsider doesn't understand the difference.

  • Reply 28 of 30
    truffoltruffol Posts: 50member
    Corporations hate bad press so they like to look for loopholes. For all these Beats employees that Apple want to fire, Apple could very well have offered them a new position with much lower salary essentially forcing them out without the bad press...

    During the financial crisis Goldman Sachs famously "accelerated" their 2-year analyst program to 1 year because the analysts showed "stellar performance" and they were basically out the door after 1 year. PR crap...
  • Reply 29 of 30
    izzysizzys Posts: 4member
    It's you who needs the grammar lesson. 'Refute' is the correct word.

    Why are the most ignorant persons frequently the loudest?
  • Reply 30 of 30

    My understanding is that since both companies were based in Ireland they are governed by EU employment laws that would prevent mass layoffs of employees for a certain period of time after the acquisition usually 18-24 months. My experience in the past shows this to be enforceable even if the employees are working in countries outside of the EU. 

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