Apple's Steve Jobs had vision of building an open Wi-Fi utopia

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 71
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,476moderator
    docno42 wrote: »
    Marvin wrote: »
    This sort of thing shouldn't be far off with cellular tech:

    Ahh, the wireless perpetual motion machine...

    RF spectrum is a constrained resource. Once it's saturated, that's it - it's used up. Also the more devices you have, the more issues you get into with collision, overlap, etc. Heck, you can get interference from just about anything - microwaves, cosmic waves, poorly shielded electrical equipment - so the theoretical maximums for most RF spectrum are really theoretical.

    Peer to peer wireless can work, but it's hardly fast. And it won't scale. It's not replacing hard lines (be they copper, coax or fiber) any time soon.

    The system described and demonstrated with pCells uses interference to work. They are able to put as many transmitters as they want close to each other. There will still be a limit to how much it can scale but they think that stadium wifi is possible with it:

    http://www.mobilesportsreport.com/2014/03/artemis-networks-adding-stadium-wi-fi-market-to-its-targets/

    That's not cellular signals, it's wifi signals but uses the same antenna technology. They can use whichever works best in each scenario. Heavily congested, small spaces can use multiple wifi antennas if the range is acceptable. More open spaces can use the cell networks. This helps take the strain off the cellular networks.
  • Reply 62 of 71
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,540member
    Marvin wrote: »
    The system described and demonstrated with pCells uses interference to work. They are able to put as many transmitters as they want close to each other. There will still be a limit to how much it can scale but they think that stadium wifi is possible with it:

    And I wish them luck. It would be awesome if it works as planned.

    Still not holding my breath :p
  • Reply 63 of 71
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    docno42 wrote: »
    A VPN between my roaming device and a known good ISP entry point takes care of the low hanging fruit today, but as more and more exploits become prevalent and as more ISPs are attacked I don't think it's safe to assume that any point between you and the server you are connecting to is safe. It never really has been, but historically it's been impractical or pretty much unnecessary to worry about all the points between. It seems the safe ground and reasonable assumptions are quickly changing. Be the threats originate from governments, government backed/condoned hacker groups like the Russian hackers stealing large amounts of accounts that broke yesterday, or other groups. The only safe thing to assume is that everything is hostile. That has high costs and a large pain factor, but I think as time goes on people who really care are going to start using security as a major discriminator in their choices. This is just the beginning (finally!)

    This I get, and agree upon. But what would the benefits be for having a secure connection to this site?
  • Reply 64 of 71
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    philboogie wrote: »
    This I get, and agree upon. But what would the benefits be for having a secure connection to this site?

    Since I don't use a VPN and I do post stuff to this site I wouldn't mind an option to have what I write (and read) on this site encrypted on the local end as I do frequent open WiFi hotspots. I really can't think of what highly personal info could be stolen but I'd like the option to protect it nonetheless.
  • Reply 65 of 71
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Since I don't use a VPN and I do post stuff to this site I wouldn't mind an option to have what I write (and read) on this site encrypted on the local end as I do frequent open WiFi hotspots. I really can't think of what highly personal info could be stolen but I'd like the option to protect it nonetheless.

    Ok, so, open WiFi. Those are indeed fully open, so to speak. But once you hit the submit button that data you've sent is now on this forum, available to anyone. People don't even need an account to read it, so maybe you mean other data, like originating IP(?)
  • Reply 66 of 71
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    philboogie wrote: »
    Ok, so, open WiFi. Those are indeed fully open, so to speak. But once you hit the submit button that data you've sent is now on this forum, available to anyone. People don't even need an account to read it, so maybe you mean other data, like originating IP(?)

    Private messages and account settings are unencrypted, too. My originating IP would be the same for everyone on the public WiFi.
  • Reply 67 of 71
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Private messages and account settings are unencrypted, too. My originating IP would be the same for everyone on the public WiFi.

    Aha, good point points.
  • Reply 68 of 71
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,540member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Private messages and account settings are unencrypted, too. My originating IP would be the same for everyone on the public WiFi.

    Most importantly the authentication token in your cookie is unencrypted - how many people think to log out when done surfing a site?
  • Reply 69 of 71
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    docno42 wrote: »

    Most importantly the authentication token in your cookie is unencrypted - how many people think to log out when done surfing a site?

    Hmm. I don't. Does surfing the web through the browser from 1Password help? I understand it automatically can log you in, but does it automatically log you out? Maybe I should pop that question I the appropriate thread.
  • Reply 70 of 71
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,540member
    philboogie wrote: »
    Hmm. I don't. Does surfing the web through the browser from 1Password help? I understand it automatically can log you in, but does it automatically log you out? Maybe I should pop that question I the appropriate thread.

    Nope. Once you authenticate with a site like AI, instead of continually asking you for your password the set a token in a cookie. That's your "session" - when you "log out" they just invalidate that token on the server and delete it from the cookie. If you don't log out theoretically someone could take your token and impersonate you.

    That's why better sites ask for your password again before allowing any account information (or passwords) to be changed.
  • Reply 71 of 71
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    docno42 wrote: »
    ^ post.

    Good to know, thanks.
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