Apple says iCloud is safe and secure, stolen celebrity pics were targeted accounts

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  • Reply 121 of 178
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,702member
    jonl wrote: »

    Just so you'll know, I neither wrote nor quoted what you attributed to me.

    Ugh, crappy quoting in these new forums :p Sorry 'bout that - it's fixed.
  • Reply 122 of 178
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post



    1) Good article, and quick. Thanks for that.



    2) This is incorrect: I cannot "change my security questions"






    I always answer those with responses completely irrelevant to the questions.

  • Reply 123 of 178
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

    I’d also love to be able to write MY OWN QUESTIONS.


     

    Why not use the answers to the questions you'd like to write?

     

    There's less chance of guessing nonsensical answers that don't relate to the questions.

  • Reply 124 of 178
    jonljonl Posts: 210member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post



    Ugh, crappy quoting in these new forums image Sorry 'bout that - it's fixed.

    No problemo. 8-)

  • Reply 125 of 178
    hentaiboyhentaiboy Posts: 1,249member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    According to Gawker, the collection of pictures are as a result of potentially years' worth of work by hackers...



    ...the pictures may in fact have been part of a collection that grew over the years but stayed out of the public eye.

    So which of you clowns still thinks that Samsung or the credit card companies are behind this?

  • Reply 126 of 178
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post





    Apple has two factor already. If you haven't turned it on, do so!

     

    No worries here! I've had two factor enabled for quite some time now.;)

  • Reply 127 of 178
    hentaiboy wrote: »
    So which of you clowns still thinks that Samsung or the credit card companies are behind this?

    Trilateral Commission! /s
  • Reply 128 of 178
    What a poorly worded press release.

    Btw it's here
    https://www.apple.com/pr/library/2014/09/02Apple-Media-Advisory.html

    Apple calls their customers "certain celebrities"... That just made me throw up a little bit inside...
  • Reply 129 of 178
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,702member
    Good grief - if this doesn't make your skin crawl: https://www.nikcub.com/posts/notes-on-the-celebrity-data-theft/
  • Reply 130 of 178
    woochifer wrote: »
    The issue I see is having the photo storage enabled by default when you activate iCloud. I only activated iCloud because I wanted switch on the Find My iPhone activation lock. I had no idea when I did this that all my photos were also getting duplicated locally and uploaded to iCloud.

    With other cloud services, I choose what to store and what to automatically sync. But, those are not services that I enable as part of a device activation. My point is simply that I can see a lot of people having their photos uploaded to iCloud without their knowledge. If someone wants to stalk a celebrity, they can peruse through private photos that the victim doesn't even know were uploaded from their phone in the first place.
    I'm pretty sure PhotoStream is opt in when setting up/configuring your device. I can't remember exactly but someone else can verify that.
  • Reply 131 of 178
    Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

    There's less chance of guessing nonsensical answers that don't relate to the questions.


     

    Exactly: I will never be able to remember them. I can’t remember anything. I can’t ever address anyone by name because I don’t remember them. At least give me questions for which I can guess the answers...

  • Reply 132 of 178
    apple ][ wrote: »
    Pro tip.

    Don't answer security questions with a real answer.

    If you went to elementary school at PS 123, then you don't give that as an answer when it asks you what school you went to.

    Yes, but how to remember the fictional answers?
  • Reply 133 of 178
    Yes, but how to remember the fictional answers?

    Store it as a note in the 1Password or similar app. Personally I think these questions are pathetically configured, without any thought put in. If they want us to answer questions as a security measure, shouldn't we be able to create the questions ourselves? Yes, that will create a boatload of unique questions as opposed to the 3 standard ones every company now has, but what will that add to their data storage; a MB or two?

    Hill60 is right; I also answer with the 'strangest of weirdest'
  • Reply 134 of 178
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    This is on the Drudge Report right now. Links to a Daily Mail article that is 2 days old.

    [IMG]http://i59.tinypic.com/3463ntw.jpg[/IMG]

    Go to the Daily Mail website and they have an entire section devoted to what they call the "Apple hacking scandal". Quite irresponsible to call it an Apple hacking scandal considering the fact that there is no conclusive evidence that iCloud was hacked (and Apple says it wasn't) or that FMI brute force was the source.

    [quote]“In reviewing months worth of forum posts, image board posts, private emails, replies for requests for services, etc. nowhere was the FindMyPhone API brute force technique (revealed publicly and exploited in iBrute) mentioned,” Cubrilovic reports. “This doesn’t mean that it wasn’t used privately by the hackers – but judging by the skill levels involved, the mentions and tutorials around other techniques and some of the bragged about success rates with social engineering, recovery, resets, rats and phishing – it appears that such techniques were not necessary or never discovered.”
    https://www.nikcub.com/posts/notes-on-the-celebrity-data-theft/[/quote]

    Color me highly skeptical that it's just a coincidence this leaks now right before Apple has a big event scheduled.
  • Reply 135 of 178
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    krawall wrote: »
    What a poorly worded press release.

    Btw it's here
    https://www.apple.com/pr/library/2014/09/02Apple-Media-Advisory.html

    Apple calls their customers "certain celebrities"... That just made me throw up a little bit inside...
    Huh? It was celebrities that were targeted. And we don't know for sure that all of them were Apple customers either. What are they supposed to say?
  • Reply 136 of 178

    I'd still have called them "customers". Or users. I mean, yes perhaps not all of the affected were apple customers per se, but the press release obviously targets those that are using their servers.

     

    I just feel the press release was written very unprofessionally.  Especially for the grief it has caused for the ones concerned it could have been written differently.

  • Reply 137 of 178
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    hentaiboy wrote: »
    So which of you clowns still thinks that Samsung or the credit card companies are behind this?
    Daily Mail website has a whole section on this and they call it the "Apple hacking scandal". No way is it just a coincidence this leaks a week before a major Apple event. An event that is likely to heavily feature mobile payments, HealthKit and HomeKit. IMO there is a concerted effort to tarnish Apple's reputation and those involved know the Daily Mail's and Drudge Report's of the world will be willing accomplices.
  • Reply 138 of 178
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    lkrupp wrote: »
    Almost as if this was orchestrated a few days before Apple’s announced event. Makes you wonder.
    Doesn't make me wonder. No way did this just happen to leak now. No doubt in my mind it was intentional.
  • Reply 139 of 178
    Can we finally put user generated passwords to rest as a useless security mechanism?
  • Reply 140 of 178
    If I ever saw an excellent use case for a smart iWatch, it is to send instant two-factor verification codes at every login! That would make iCloud super secure!
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