Sight unseen, Apple's competitors expect 'iWatch' to help establish wearable computing market

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 73
    I'm keen to get a smart watch, but there's no way I will buy anything until I see what Apple comes out with. Even if the iwatch disappoints, it will get buyers like me off the sidelines and into the smart watch market.
  • Reply 22 of 73
    allenbf wrote: »
    You have a lot of CDs lying around, do ya?  

    I do, but at this point they're in three giant boxes in a closet. I refuse to get rid of the original source. I did get rid of the cassette tapes though. I chuckle sometimes about how many times I've purchased the same music.

    I wouldn't mind that concept today either, although without the optical drive.
  • Reply 23 of 73
    [COLOR=blue][/COLOR]

    Very excited about September 9, finally a real answer to next gen. of iPhones. Will admitt some mock ups like the i watch above are nice. With all the rumors going on, its hard to tell what to be excited about. Sapphire displays from one source to no sapphire from another.. I do hope they shine some light on the iwatch as well. Less then a week and we will have real answers and I'll have my destiny edition ps4! The 9th is a good day.
  • Reply 24 of 73

    If Samsung prepared some anti-Apple ads about iWatch; come Tuesday, they'll have to do some major editing :D

  • Reply 25 of 73
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

     

    You have a lot of CDs lying around, do ya?  


     

    [Stares at shelves of data/audio CDs]

     

    You say that like it's a bad thing.  Deprecated by Apple <> no longer useful (albeit in a niche setting).

  • Reply 26 of 73
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



     ... an Apple wearable device would "expand the market."

     

    But how big will that market ever be?  And for how long will wrist-tops be the wearable device of choice?

    Let's say the "iWatch" hardware sales earn Apple an average of $1 billion in sales annually for 10 years.

    (Generous estimate.) That's only a tiny fraction of Apple's overall earnings.  Just a drop in the bucket.

    Is it really worth it for Apple to ship a wrist-top device?

     

    I think it's worth it for Apple if their wearable device(s) can be used to purchase goods and content.

    There would be one less step between thinking about buying something and actually pulling the trigger.

    Tap the Touch ID button on your "iWatch" and boom, you bought something.  Just one step.

    (More steps with an iPhone: pull iPhone out, make sure it's not upside-down, tap Touch ID button, put it back.)

    The easier it is to buy things with "iWatch," the more frequently people will buy with "iWatch."

     

    Which brings us to where the rubber really meets the road: how and when Apple will make money from "iWatch"?

    Presumably Apple will get a cut of the revenue generated from every sale through all iOS devices.

    If so, iOS devices will continue to generate revenue for Apple long after the initial hardware purchase.

    And "iWatch" will be a faster, easier device for making contactless mobile purchases.

     

    [Update: then again, maybe not so much added revenue through "iWallet" functionality:  

     http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/09/05/apples-iwallet-payments-seen-as-unlikely-to-earn-much-money-but-will-lock-in-users-to-iphone-ecosystem]

     

    (And as an aside, I'd expect ATMs to eventually be contactless so you wouldn't need an ATM card

    if you have an "iWatch" or NFC-or-whatever-enabled iOS device.  Tap the Touch ID button, tap an amount,

    and cash would pop out of the ATM's slot.  No card swiping.  No PIN typing.)

  • Reply 27 of 73
    I do, but at this point they're in three giant boxes in a closet. I refuse to get rid of the original source. I did get rid of the cassette tapes though. I chuckle sometimes about how many times I've purchased the same music.

    I wouldn't mind that concept today either, although without the optical drive.


    Hey, you and me both.... But have stopped buying cd, DVDs, and even blu-ray. I'm sticking with digital downloads. Use vudu (ultraviolet) for my movies and iTunes for my music, just need apple's car play for my car. Been checking out pioneers touch screens with it. If anyone has one, let me know how you like it and if its worth the money.
  • Reply 28 of 73
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,350member

    By "define the market" they actually mean "give us all something to copy since we couldn't figure out what people actually need or desire on our own"...

  • Reply 29 of 73
    Apple has not manufactured the iWatch which is why no parts have leaked. Not because of mfg issues, but because they don't want parts leaked before the announcement.
  • Reply 30 of 73
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,350member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PScooter63 View Post

     

    You say that like it's a bad thing.  Deprecated by Apple <> no longer useful (albeit in a niche setting).


    Syntax Error. You are using a VBScript inequality comparator. Please update to !=

  • Reply 31 of 73
    sockrolid wrote: »
    But how big will that market ever be?  And for how long will wrist-tops be the wearable device of choice?
    Let's say the "iWatch" hardware sales earn Apple an average of $1 billion in sales annually for 10 years.
    (Generous estimate.) <span style="line-height:1.4em;">That's only a tiny fraction of Apple's overall earnings.  Just a drop in the bucket.</span>

    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">Is it really worth it for Apple to ship a wrist-top device?</span>


    I think it's worth it for Apple if their wearable device(s) can be used to purchase goods and content.
    There would be one less step between thinking about buying something and actually pulling the trigger.
    Tap the Touch ID button on your "iWatch" and boom, you bought something.  Just one step.
    (More steps with an iPhone: pull iPhone out, make sure it's not upside-down, tap Touch ID button, put it back.)
    The easier it is to buy things with "iWatch," the more frequently people will buy with "iWatch."

    Which brings us to where the rubber really meets the road: how and when Apple will make money from "iWatch"?
    Presumably Apple will get a cut of the revenue generated from every sale through all iOS devices.
    If so, iOS devices will continue to generate revenue for Apple long after the initial hardware purchase.
    And "iWatch" will be a faster, easier device for making contactless mobile purchases.

    [Update: then again, maybe not so much added revenue through "iWallet" functionality:  
     http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/09/05/apples-iwallet-payments-seen-as-unlikely-to-earn-much-money-but-will-lock-in-users-to-iphone-ecosystem]

    (And as an aside, I'd expect ATMs to eventually be contactless so you wouldn't need an ATM card
    if you have an "iWatch" or NFC-or-whatever-enabled iOS device.  Tap the Touch ID button, tap an amount,
    and cash would pop out of the ATM's slot.  No card swiping.  No PIN typing.)

    The iWatch won't be about making large buckets of money. It'll be about locking consumers Into the ecosystem. If someone buys an iwatch because it's fashionable, then buys some pay-for apps, they are unlikely to then buy a sammy or android phone, they are more likely to buy an iphone because it'll be compatible and likely have some benefits to being tethered.

    This is apples business's strategy 101.
  • Reply 32 of 73
    mhiklmhikl Posts: 471member

    Should Apple’s iWatch make it to the iStore and open possibility where other’s failed to tread, then for sure the great fruit company can pound its chest to proclaim:

    “The Spirit of Steve stands strong of will against the rabble of copy whose sails do fail the winds of change”.

  • Reply 33 of 73
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,789member

    Originally Posted by TheRealTom View Post





    The iWatch won't be about making large buckets of money. It'll be about locking consumers Into the ecosystem. If someone buys an iwatch because it's fashionable, then buys some pay-for apps, they are unlikely to then buy a sammy or android phone, they are more likely to buy an iphone because it'll be compatible and likely have some benefits to being tethered.



    This is apples business's strategy 101.

     

    There's no lock-in.  Verizon locked users in by storing their contacts on their server instead of on their handsets.  That's lock-in because if you want to switch to AT&T and you have hundreds of contacts, you either lose them or you need to figure out some arcane way of extracting them from the server and getting them onto your AT&T handset.

     

    Apple pulls users in with quality and value.  That's Apple's business strategy 101.

    They can't force anybody to do anything.

    You buy an iWatch, purchase a few things through it, you can still wear a Moto 360 on the other wrist.

  • Reply 34 of 73
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

    It's also expected that it will come in two sizes for men and women.

     

    I hope the different sizes are not targeted to specific genders. People of each gender have different size wrists. This probably comes as news to many current watch manufacturers ...

  • Reply 35 of 73

    The iPad helped establish the tablet market, but very few, if any, other players have been able to make any money at it and smartphones are mostly a losing proposition for anyone outside of Apple other than Samsung. I think wearables are going to be so tightly integrated with the smartphone platform of choice that there will be no room to woo customers unless you convince them to change their phone platform too. There will be some generic ones that are platform agnostic but they won't have the deep integration that will drive large scale adoption. I think this will be another case with a lot of manufacturers making noise and Apple making all the money. I think the real competition will be from and to watch makers. How will fashion companies deal with a trendy wearable displacing sales of watches? Will they have an option to embrace the platform? Can I buy my wife a Chanel or Cartier iWatch? How many Christmases and Father's days of down sales will Rolex, Omega or even Seiko suffer before they do something to avoid a fate similar to that ob BlackBerry? Will watchbands become the new iPhone case?  Will be interesting to see. 

  • Reply 36 of 73
    ijalex wrote: »
    Hey, you and me both.... But have stopped buying cd, DVDs, and even blu-ray. I'm sticking with digital downloads. Use vudu (ultraviolet) for my movies and iTunes for my music, just need apple's car play for my car. Been checking out pioneers touch screens with it. If anyone has one, let me know how you like it and if its worth the money.

    I've gone all digital at this point as well and it's mostly Apple and iTunes. I have Apple pieces all over the house. Air Play everywhere! Not because it's a fanatic thing, just because it's easier. I can't help with carplay because at this point I'm not interested in it at all.

    I'm also sitting out on the new stuff this year unless the wearable is astounding, but I just upgraded my iDevices last winter and they still work fine. I bent the iPad Air somehow, (think it over heated and warped) but I bent it back and it still works perfect. I'm waiting for a 4k mini to replace my media hub, but I think HDMI 2 needs to standardized first.
  • Reply 37 of 73
    sockrolid wrote: »

    (And as an aside, I'd expect ATMs to eventually be contactless so you wouldn't need an ATM card
    if you have an "iWatch" or NFC-or-whatever-enabled iOS device.  Tap the Touch ID button, tap an amount,
    and cash would pop out of the ATM's slot.  No card swiping.  No PIN typing.)

    ATM's already have me nervous. They give your card back right away now, at least where I am, then let you continue your transaction. So when I'm done I'm always wondering "So it's not on my account anymore right?" Especially if there's people in line waiting to use the same machine.
  • Reply 38 of 73
    512ke512ke Posts: 782member

    Anything Apple makes, its competitors can make cheaper and faster, that's for sure.

     

    It's all about the OS in wearables.  iOS vs Google vs Tizen etc

     

    It's about how you integrate everything and create a user experience -- that's what will decide if any of these gizmos is a break-out hit.

     

    My money's on Apple personally.

  • Reply 39 of 73
    Now that Apple had a clear idea about how competition would replicate the devices in every category it redefined (SmartPhone, Tablet)...rest assured that it will ensure that entry barriers for competition is DAMN high for any new category it gets into.

    The entry barriers encompass
    a) Component/material levels (ex: Custom Sapphire, Liquid Metal Branding Logo, superior sensors).
    b) User features tied to those complicated components (ex; Touch ID, A7/A8 chip level Vault)
    c) New Features capitalizing upon itunes-ecosystem and apple-negotiation-heft for critical mass adoption (Payments)

    ..it will be interesting to see how the competition responds to this hard-to-reproduce strategy!
  • Reply 40 of 73
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jkichline View Post

     

    By "define the market" they actually mean "give us all something to copy since we couldn't figure out what people actually need or desire on our own"...


    Get ready for the next wave of lawsuits...

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