First look: Hands-on with the all-new Apple Watch

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Comments

  • Reply 141 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

     

     

    I’m a fan of them slowly moving away from the i prefix. I prefer Apple in the name now.


    Amen.  The i thing is iTired.

  • Reply 142 of 162
    anomeanome Posts: 1,443member
    redhotfuzz wrote: »
    Amen.  The i thing is iTired.
    Plus it's a prime target for parody. And if they shift to "AppleX" for everything, it will be easier for them to get their trademarks.

    I was semi-serious about that Mac Air. I would not be surprised if the next major refresh of the iMac shifts to a different name, more in line with the mini, Air, Pro naming.
  • Reply 143 of 162
    Quote:



    Originally Posted by sternapples53 View Post



    The whole smart watch concept is just a curiosity. its really a product you do not need. No one will be using one in 5 years, its the Edsel of the tech industry.

     

    Hmm, didn't people say the same thing about home computers a few decades ago?

  • Reply 144 of 162

    Not really. the watch is different it needs an iPhone to make it work, its just an accessory not a stand alone gadget. The iPad had books and magazines going for it.the iPhone is a phone. What can you really do with it that the other two can't do, zilch. I can do all the heart stuff cheaper by just buying a hear rate monitor and using an app on my iPhone. I can tell time by looking at my iPhone. I can read email and books on my iPhone. So really what is the point of this thing. Its not a game changer unless some one has some brilliant piece of software to make me or anyone else want to buy it for now it goes along the route of the segway and google glass. fun idea but totally useless except for rich kids who will get bored of it very fast.

  • Reply 145 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by r4d4 View Post

     

    No one appreciates anything anymore. Sad world we live in.


     

    I think this is very true.

  • Reply 146 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ingsoc View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by r4d4 View Post

     

    No one appreciates anything anymore. Sad world we live in.


     

    I think this is very true.


     

    It's possibly a tiny bit of a generalisation.

  • Reply 147 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

     

    It's possibly a tiny bit of a generalisation.


     

    For the sake of having more than a one-word response: Duh. ;-)

  • Reply 148 of 162
    Haters gonna hate but watch this thing take off like a jet%u2026 needless to say the competition is going to pee itself trying to catch up.
  • Reply 149 of 162
    Oh, really? Care to make it interesting?

    In five years, the watch may be able to replace the phone for some people. You have no idea what roadmap Apple has planned.

    Just wondering if you happened to see my post of a couple of days ago... where I said much the same thing.

    -- It's the COMPUTER IN THE ?Watch that's most interesting here.

    -- It just happens to be in a watch enclosure in it's first iteration... but it could find it's way into many different wearable or other tech objects in the future. It "could be" in just an arm band, or shoes, or sewn into many different wearables... let alone the computer that powers the iPhone 10 or iPad 8... which could be little more than a piece of glass and aluminum backing.

    -- Apple is shrinking computers, and at the same time making them every more capable and powerful. The hockey stick curved graph from iPhone 1 to iPhone 6 really stuck in my head: 87x more powerful in less than 7 years! That is simply just amazing!

    -- Let's take Google Glass for an example. If Apple ever makes a similar product in the future, the entire computer could conceivably be 50x more powerful than the ?Watch and completely embedded in normal fashionable eye wear frames. No clip on, no flip over glass.... no "glasshole".

    *** And the one thing that Apple must do, for this miniaturization to pay off? They MUST TAKE CONTROL of, and an even more active role in, developing alternative sustainable energy sources and batteries. They can no longer leave this to their suppliers, nor any other tech company. The must do it themselves. It is the last bottleneck to future advances in technology IMHO.

    Edited to add: I just ran across this article at of all places ZDnet (?!)... that pretty much points to what I'm trying to get across here.

    Apple Watch: This is what happens when tech and fashion collide

    Quote: It's possible that smartwatches will be the last gadgets that are obviously computing devices. We're approaching the point at which the technology is small enough (even now a smartwatch is roughly as powerful as a first generation smartphone) and that there is enough computing power embedded in the fabric (perhaps even quite literally, in our clothes) of the world around us, that we will be surrounded by it - and we won't notice it at all.
  • Reply 150 of 162
    rogifan wrote: »
    Found this on Instagram. I guess these are some of the people who worked on the watch. More evidence of the Tim a Cook era. I can't imagine Steve Jobs ever allowing a photo like this.

    10693260_331291927047956_677057098_n.jpg

    Err ...

    1000


    http://www.zdnet.com/photos/an-inside-look-at-the-original-macintosh-photos_p11/6189522#photo



    And

    1000


    http://www.businessinsider.com/where-are-the-people-from-this-iconic-photo-of-the-original-mac-team-today-2012-2?op=1


    If you surf a bit -- you can find more!


    I don't have a picture of it, but while the original Mac team was in the final weeks of development -- someone (Steve or with Steve;a approval) had some special T-Shirts made:

    "[working] 100 hours a week and Loving it!"

    Members of the team regularly visited our Sunnyvale store wearing these ...

    My wife, Lucy, collected Apple Ts and often wore them to work -- she tried her best to talk Andy out of his ... No luck! :D

    T-Shirts were the popular thing in Silicon Valley back then -- some are quite rare and valued as collector's items.
  • Reply 151 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post





    Err ...









    http://www.zdnet.com/photos/an-inside-look-at-the-original-macintosh-photos_p11/6189522#photo







    And









    http://www.businessinsider.com/where-are-the-people-from-this-iconic-photo-of-the-original-mac-team-today-2012-2?op=1





    If you surf a bit -- you can find more!





    I don't have a picture of it, but while the original Mac team was in the final weeks of development -- someone (Steve or with Steve;a approval) had some special T-Shirts made:



    "[working] 100 hours a week and Loving it!"



    Members of the team regularly visited our Sunnyvale store wearing these ...



    My wife, Lucy, collected Apple Ts and often wore them to work -- she tried her best to talk Andy out of his ... No luck! image



    T-Shirts were the popular thing in Silicon Valley back then -- some are quite rare and valued as collector's items.

     

    That's really cool that you were immersed in all of that. I have a couple coworkers who had a similar experience with Pixar exposure back in the day. Cool stuff.

  • Reply 152 of 162
    To PixelDoc:

    Yes, for all our technological advances, battery technology is still in the dark ages. No Moores Law for batteries, that's for sure.

    Without a seismic shift, we will remain sorely restricted by it, and that's one of the most damaging things to the Apple Watch. It creates all kinds of limitations beyond the size of the watch.

    Imagine if there was no issue of power with the Apple Watch? You could have wireless everything, unlimited sensors, bright display, holographic display, you name it.

    I don't think there'll be a decisive shift in the popularity of wearables until that leap in power management takes place.
  • Reply 153 of 162
    To PixelDoc:

    Yes, for all our technological advances, battery technology is still in the dark ages. No Moores Law for batteries, that's for sure.

    Without a seismic shift, we will remain sorely restricted by it, and that's one of the most damaging things to the Apple Watch. It creates all kinds of limitations beyond the size of the watch.

    Imagine if there was no issue of power with the Apple Watch? You could have wireless everything, unlimited sensors, bright display, holographic display, you name it.

    I don't think there'll be a decisive shift in the popularity of wearables until that leap in power management takes place.

    I don't think the following will provide a significant advancement in battery technology ... rather, it could make battery technology/capacity a non-issue ...

    The site is:

    http://www.artemis.com

    They use a technology called pCell where wireless cell radio signals are aggregated at a .5 cm point (an unique pCell for your phone) by combining the noise of multiple, overlapping signals and focusing them a single point. Each phone within range has its own unique pCell (by its location) -- and many pCells can share the same bandwidth without degrading others.

    There are quite few demos of this -- and if real could revolutionize cell phone networks.


    The reason that I bring this up in relation to your post about batteries and power management -- is that the inventor, Steve Perlman, has dropped hints that the pCell technology can be used for other things ... I think what he is hinting at is that power can be sent as well as data -- and aggrregated in the same way ...

    If true, that would mean that your iPhone or AppleWatch could be charged continuously while being used, while out and about (or stationary). Same for your electric automobile -- while driving down the highway ...

    I am no expert on this, but I've read that this wireless power transmission has been experimented with for years ... It would appear that that low power and focused aggregation would remove any danger of harming the device or the wearer.

    Possible???
  • Reply 154 of 162
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RedHotFuzz View Post

     

     

    Hmm, didn't people say the same thing about home computers a few decades ago?


    And then there were going to be phones without buttons? How absurd.

  • Reply 155 of 162
    jfc1138 wrote: »
    And then there were going to be phones without buttons? How absurd.

    Show me a buttonless phone.
  • Reply 156 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Show me a buttonless phone.

     

    Presumably he means a keypad.

    It's kind of funny to go back and watch the unveiling of the original iPhone, given how standard touch screen phones are now (and how they were anything but standard in 2007).

  • Reply 157 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ingsoc View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Show me a buttonless phone.

     

    Presumably he means a keypad.

    It's kind of funny to go back and watch the unveiling of the original iPhone, given how standard touch screen phones are now (and how they were anything but standard in 2007).


     

    Funny isn't the word.

  • Reply 158 of 162
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

     

     

    Funny isn't the word.


     

    What is the word?

  • Reply 159 of 162
    ingsoc wrote: »
     

    Funny isn't the word.

    What is the word?

    Dunno.
  • Reply 160 of 162

    Hi Anome,

     

    Glad I could help! :)

     

    (I'm the one who wrote the article you linked.)

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