Apple's iTunes 11.4 update for OS X Mavericks adds iOS 8 support

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited September 2014
Apple on Tuesday released the latest version of iTunes for OS X 10.9 Mavericks, bringing support for the company's upcoming iOS 8 mobile operating system.




While not much is offered in the way of specifics, the new iTunes version will bring support for devices being upgraded to the forthcoming iOS 8 operating system, which is scheduled for release on Sept. 17.

Earlier today, Apple released the golden master iOS 8 build to developers, the final step before a software's public release.

Users can download iTunes 11.4 for OS X Mavericks via the Mac App Store or Software Update.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    iTunes 11.4 also supports OS X 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard) and later, so those on Snow Leopard, Lion or Mountain Lion will not be forced to upgrade their OS X version in order to sync a device running iOS 8 with their Mac.
  • Reply 2 of 8
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,313member

    I don’t understand why the co-called tech illuminati always dump on iTunes. It just works and works well. I have no issues to report and am a very satisfied user.

  • Reply 3 of 8
    aaronjaaronj Posts: 1,595member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

     

    I don’t understand why the co-called tech illuminati always dump on iTunes. It just works and works well. I have no issues to report and am a very satisfied user.


     

    Likewise.

     

    They do it because it's "cool" to do it.

  • Reply 4 of 8
    They need to update the 12 beta. I had to revert to 11.3 to install iOS 8
  • Reply 5 of 8
    dempson wrote: »
    iTunes 11.4 also supports OS X 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard) and later, so those on Snow Leopard, Lion or Mountain Lion will not be forced to upgrade their OS X version in order to sync a device running iOS 8 with their Mac.
    Question: why stay on older versions, it's free most likely compatible with your device.
    macvertigo wrote: »
    They need to update the 12 beta. I had to revert to 11.3 to install iOS 8
    Probably before IOS 8 actually comes out
  • Reply 6 of 8
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post





    Question: why stay on older versions, it's free most likely compatible with your device.

    1. Early 2006 Mac models (and the Late 2006 Mac Mini) cannot upgrade beyond Mac OS X 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard), because their 32-bit processor is unable to run anything later.

     

    2. Late 2006 and some 2007-2008 Mac models cannot upgrade beyond Mac OS X 10.7.5 (Lion), ignoring workarounds/hacks which are possible in some cases.

     

    3. Some people are choosing to stay on Mac OS X 10.6.8 despite their Mac being able to run later versions, either because they don't like the direction Apple has taken with the user interface or other aspects of later operating systems, or because they need to run older PowerPC-only Mac applications which cannot run in Mac OS X 10.7 and later (short of a solution like running 10.6.8 Server in a virtual machine, or keeping a second Mac running the old OS).

     

    4. There are a few applications which have compatibility issues with later OS X versions, which may require expensive upgrades (or not be supported any more, requiring the application be completely replaced, or using a VM or another Mac to run the application).

     

    iTunes 11.4 supporting Mac OS X 10.6.8 through OS X 10.8.5 means people in these situations are not forced to buy a new Mac or deal with other compatibility problems just to be able to upgrade their existing devices to iOS 8, or to buy a new iPhone.

     

    We don't know how much longer Apple will support Mac OS X 10.6 in future iTunes updates, especially iTunes updates required for compatibility with new iOS device models or iOS versions. iTunes support for Mac OS X 10.5 was dropped in September 2012, when Mac OS X 10.5 was almost five years old. iTunes support for Mac OS X 10.6 has just passed the five year mark. Apple has stopped supporting Mac OS X 10.6 in most other areas (e.g. Security and Safari updates ended about a year ago).

  • Reply 7 of 8
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,179member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dempson View Post

     

    1. Early 2006 Mac models (and the Late 2006 Mac Mini) cannot upgrade beyond Mac OS X 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard), because their 32-bit processor is unable to run anything later.

     

    2. Late 2006 and some 2007-2008 Mac models cannot upgrade beyond Mac OS X 10.7.5 (Lion), ignoring workarounds/hacks which are possible in some cases.

     

    3. Some people are choosing to stay on Mac OS X 10.6.8 despite their Mac being able to run later versions, either because they don't like the direction Apple has taken with the user interface or other aspects of later operating systems, or because they need to run older PowerPC-only Mac applications which cannot run in Mac OS X 10.7 and later (short of a solution like running 10.6.8 Server in a virtual machine, or keeping a second Mac running the old OS).

     

    4. There are a few applications which have compatibility issues with later OS X versions, which may require expensive upgrades (or not be supported any more, requiring the application be completely replaced, or using a VM or another Mac to run the application).

     

    iTunes 11.4 supporting Mac OS X 10.6.8 through OS X 10.8.5 means people in these situations are not forced to buy a new Mac or deal with other compatibility problems just to be able to upgrade their existing devices to iOS 8, or to buy a new iPhone.

     

    We don't know how much longer Apple will support Mac OS X 10.6 in future iTunes updates, especially iTunes updates required for compatibility with new iOS device models or iOS versions. iTunes support for Mac OS X 10.5 was dropped in September 2012, when Mac OS X 10.5 was almost five years old. iTunes support for Mac OS X 10.6 has just passed the five year mark. Apple has stopped supporting Mac OS X 10.6 in most other areas (e.g. Security and Safari updates ended about a year ago).


     

    Maybe I'm crazy, but I find it difficult to understand why people with 7-8 year old hardware (or older) feel infinitely entitled to have the latest version of every piece of software. There comes a point where it's rational to accept dropped support. There's a reason better hardware is developed, which is to support and take advantage of better software. Software meant to run on ancient hardware is more bloated, less optimized and efficient, and can't be as ambitious. Someone who hasn't spent a dollar on their machine in almost a decade has no right to continue demanding the newest pieces of software for free- software which is a "value-added" service to hardware. 

  • Reply 8 of 8
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

     

     

    Maybe I'm crazy, but I find it difficult to understand why people with 7-8 year old hardware (or older) feel infinitely entitled to have the latest version of every piece of software. There comes a point where it's rational to accept dropped support. There's a reason better hardware is developed, which is to support and take advantage of better software. Software meant to run on ancient hardware is more bloated, less optimized and efficient, and can't be as ambitious. Someone who hasn't spent a dollar on their machine in almost a decade has no right to continue demanding the newest pieces of software for free- software which is a "value-added" service to hardware. 


    I agree, but that isn't the issue. It is the "nasty surprise" scenario I'm concerned about.

     

    The problem is that when a new version of iTunes drops support for an old OS X version at the same time as being required for a new iOS version, a trap is created for people who have a Mac running that old OS X version (for whatever reason) and an existing iOS device which is eligible for the update.

     

    If they go ahead and update the iOS device (probably on the device itself, since they can't do it through iTunes on that Mac), they will lose the ability to sync that device with their Mac, unless they upgrade OS X or replace their iOS device with another one that is still running the older iOS version. (In most cases isn't possible to back out of an iOS update.) Upgrading OS X may be difficult and/or expensive depending on Mac model and application compatibility issues.

     

    This previously happened when iTunes 10.7 was released, which was required for iOS 6, and also dropped support for Mac OS X 10.5.

     

    This time around, it looks like Apple has left an escape route, at least temporarily. iTunes 11.4 will be required for syncing with iOS 8 but it will still run on OS X 10.6.8. It might be the last iTunes version which supports OS X 10.6, in which case the next iOS update which require an iTunes update will trigger the same situation, and future iOS devices (e.g. next month's likely iPads) may not be compatible with OS X 10.6.8.

     

    Encouraging those on old OS X versions to upgrade is a good idea for many reasons. For those who can't or won't upgrade, it helps if they are aware of compatibility breaks for iOS updates on their existing devices (so they can avoid the update trap), and that if there has been a compatibility break they won't be able to sync that Mac with any new iOS devices until they upgrade the Mac's software.

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